July 21, 2019
  • 10:32 am Amber Alert for Washington TeenSeattle Shuts Down Arena PlanOpposition to Transgender Ballot
  • 5:22 am US House Passes Permanent RD Tax Credit
  • 5:17 am Mirror image RNA enzymes may hold clues to origin of life
  • 5:16 am Data check Why do Chinese and Indian students come to US universities
  • 4:53 am How to tell whether that whiskey is fake

first_imgAn Amber Alert’s issued for 16-year-old Kiera Inman of Spokane, who’s described as “developmentally delayed”.Last scene Sunday night, police say the girl’s believed to be in the company of 30 year-old Zachary Jones, of Newport News, Va., in a 1997 blue Acura 4-door with Virginia plates VGD6867.Spokane Police say the paint on the trunk of the vehicle is noticeably faded and worn.The teen’s grandmother says she left evidence of leaving willingly, but functions at a diminished capacity and is unable to make realistic life choices.Anyone with information’s urged to call Spokane Police at 509-456-2233 or 911.  The Amber Alert issued for both Washington and Idaho.last_img

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Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would permanently extend a popular tax break for companies investing in research. Despite strong bipartisan support, however, the proposal appears unlikely to become law—at least not this year.The 274 to 131 vote ended several days of sniping over the bill, which would permanently renew the so-called R&D tax credit, which expired at the end of last year. Although both Democrats and Republicans sponsored the legislation, it had drawn a veto threat from the White House because it didn’t provide a way to offset the $156 billion that the tax break is expected to cost over the next decade.Republican leaders in the House argued that Congress has a long history of extending the R&D tax break—it’s been renewed 15 times since it was first adopted in 1981—without finding a way to pay for it. But Democratic leaders said Republican supporters were guilty of hypocrisy because they typically insist that any new program not add to federal spending deficits. “All of the wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth with reference to the deficit seems to go by the boards when the Republicans talk of tax cuts,” said Representative Steny Hoyer (D-MD), the second-ranking Democrat in the House, at press conference earlier this week. In a private meeting before this morning’s vote, Hoyer and other Democratic leaders asked members of their party not to vote for the bill, according to media reports. But despite the plea, 62 Democrats joined 212 Republicans to approve the legislation. Just one Republican opposed the measure.One Democrat who supported the bill, Representative Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), told CQ Roll Call that it would have been inconsistent to vote against a measure he has long supported, and that Congress typically extends the R&D tax credit without a dedicated spending offset. “It has been extended unpaid for 10 times,” he said. Blumenauer also suggested that the vote “does not matter as much because the tax credit will not pass in this form in the Senate.”The Senate is working on its own version of the legislation which would extend the credit for just 2 years. But Congress is not expected to agree on any fix, permanent or temporary, until after the elections in November. 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first_imgThe difference between RNA nucleotides and boxcars, however, is that individual nucleotides can come in either right- or left-handed forms, known as D- and L-nucleotides, respectively. All naturally occurring RNAs today are D-RNAs, but researchers can create L-RNAs in the lab. Normally, a ribozyme containing D-nucleotides won’t touch L-nucleotides, and ribozymes containing L-nucleotides won’t touch D-nucleotides. But if an opposite-handed nucleotide in a would-be complementary strand twists just right, it can fool a ribozyme and get integrated into the growing strand—with drastic consequences. Thirty years ago, researchers including Gerald Joyce, then a graduate student at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, California, showed that if a nucleotide with the opposite handedness was incorporated into a growing D- or L-RNA complementary strand, it shut down all further growth. “It acted like poison,” says Joyce, who is now at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego.This discovery raised a conundrum for origin-of-life researchers that they’ve struggled with ever since. Before life got its start, D- and L-nucleotides would likely have been equally abundant in the primordial soup. If so, how would RNA enzymes ever have managed to get the RNA copying process going without it being poisoned?Now, Joyce and his postdoc Jonathan Sczepanski have found a possible solution. Online this week in Nature, they show that by using a technique called test-tube evolution they were able to generate ribozymes capable of assembling RNA strands of the opposite handedness in the presence of a mixture of D- and L-RNA nucleotides. What’s more, when they started with a D-RNA ribozyme, they found that it preferred to work on an L-RNA template to synthesize an L-RNA complementary strand. Likewise, they prepared L-RNA ribozymes that synthesized D-RNA complementary strands from D-RNA templates. And both the D- and L-RNA ribozymes were able to make mirror image copies of themselves.The ribozymes work this trick in an unconventional way, Joyce explains. Instead of recognizing where complementary RNA bases (say an A and a U) reach across the template and complementary strand to recognize one another, the enzymes recognize the overall shape of the assembling RNA bases on the complementary strand and link whatever pieces wind up next to each other.“It’s a very exciting advance towards RNA-catalyzed RNA replication,” says Jack Szostak, an origin-of-life researcher at Harvard University who was not involved with the work. However, Szostak says, it still begs the question of where such D-RNA and L-RNA ribozymes would have come from in the first place.The answer may be forever lost to history, Joyce says. But the new work does suggest that if these cross-copying ribozymes arose early on, they could have copied both mirror versions of RNA to propel the evolution of more complex RNAs. If one of those later, more complex RNAs—say a D-RNA—proved more capable, it could have encouraged the copying of its own kind, and promoted the single-handedness in nucleotides that we see today. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Like a pair of hands that appear as mirror images of one another, biomolecules, such as DNA and RNA, come in left-handed and right-handed forms. Normally, enzymes that recognize one mirror image form won’t touch the other. But researchers have isolated RNA enzymes, known as ribozymes, that synthesize RNAs of the opposite handedness. As esoteric as this may sound, similar mirror image–making RNAs may have played a role in the early evolution of life.Researchers consider RNA a likely central figure in the origin of life. That’s because, like DNA, the molecule can store genetic information, and like proteins it can act as a chemical catalyst that speeds up normally slow reactions. Many researchers believe that life likely got its start in an “RNA world” where RNAs evolved to replicate other RNA molecules. In this scenario, the more specialized DNA and proteins arose later.Like DNA, RNA is made up of four nucleotide bases, in this case the nucleotides abbreviated A, U, C, and G. When ribozymes copy RNA, they start with a single strand of RNA that they use as a template to form a strand containing the complementary bases. C is complementary to G, and A is complementary to U. So if a template strand with the letters ACCGU were placed in a test tube with individual nucleotides floating around, the complementary bases U, G, G, C, and A would grab onto their partners on the template strand. Then for these complementary bases to form an intact complementary RNA strand, the ribozyme would need to chemically weld the adjacent nucleotides together, much as boxcars next to one another must be linked together to form a train.last_img read more

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first_img IIE Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Two new reports document the continued growth in the overall number of students coming to the United States from other countries. Those pursuing undergraduate degrees in so-called STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields make up 45% of the undergraduate total, and their share of the graduate pool is even larger. But within that broad picture are some surprising trends involving China and India, the two countries that supply the largest number of students (see graphic, above).One is that the flow of Chinese students into U.S. graduate programs is plateauing at the same time their pursuit of U.S. undergraduate degrees is soaring. Another is the recent spike in graduate students from India occurring despite a continuing small presence of Indian students at the undergraduate level.In August, ScienceInsider wrote about a report from the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) on the most recent acceptance rates for foreign students at U.S. graduate programs. Last week the report was updated to reflect this fall’s actual first-time enrollment figures. And yesterday the Institute of International Education (IIE) issued its annual Open Doors report, which covers both undergraduate and graduate students from elsewhere enrolling in the United States as well as U.S. students studying abroad. Email An explosion of Chinese undergraduatesThe numbers: Chinese undergraduate enrollment in the United States has grown from 8252 in 2000 to 110,550 last year. Almost all of that growth has occurred since 2007, and there has been a doubling since 2010.The reasons: A high score on China’s national college entrance examination, called the gaokao, enables a Chinese student to attend a top university and can punch their ticket to a successful career. It requires years of high-stress preparation, however. A growing number of parents choose to remove their children from that pressure cooker, Blumenthal says, and look for alternatives abroad. The chance for a liberal arts education at a U.S. university is an attractive alternative to the rigid undergraduate training offered by most Chinese universities, she adds.The U.S. system of higher education, Blumenthal says, offers Chinese families “a unique opportunity to shop” based on the price, quality, and reputation of the institution. The cost of out-of-state tuition at a top public U.S. university is a relative bargain for China’s growing middle class, she notes, and community colleges are dirt cheap.Recent changes in immigration policies have made the United Kingdom and Australia less desirable destinations among English-speaking countries, according to Blumenthal. She also thinks that U.S. colleges have built a sturdy support system based on their decades of experience in hosting foreign students. “In Germany or France you’re pretty much on your own” in choosing classes, completing the work, and earning a degree, she says. “Nobody is there to help if you’re having trouble.”Flat Chinese graduate enrollmentThe numbers: The CGS report says that the number of first-time graduate students this fall from China fell by 1%, the first time in the decade that it has declined. Thanks to that dip, the growth in the overall number of Chinese graduate students on U.S. campuses slowed to just 3% this fall, compared with double-digit increases in recent years. U.S. academic scientists may not be aware of this emerging trend because of the sheer number of Chinese graduate students on U.S. campuses. IIE puts the number last year at 115,727, and the CGS report says they represent one-third of all foreign graduate students.The reasons: Chinese graduate students have more options at home now. “China has pumped enormous resources into its graduate education capacity” across thousands of universities, Blumenthal says. An increasing proportion of the professors at those universities have been trained in the United States and Europe, she says, and upon their return they have implemented Western research practices. “They are beginning to teach more like we do, publish like we do, and operate their labs like we do.”At the same time, she says, the added value of a U.S. graduate degree has shrunk in relation to a comparable Chinese degree. “That’s not true for MIT [the Massachusetts Institute of Technology] or [the University of California,] Berkeley, of course—those degrees still carry a premium in the job market,” she says. “But for the vast majority of Chinese students, it’s not clear that an investment in a U.S. degree is worth it, especially when the rapid growth of the Chinese economy has created such a great need for scientific and engineering talent.”In the United States, a tight job market often translates into more students attending graduate school in the hope that it will give them an edge. But high unemployment rates among college graduates in China haven’t created a potentially larger pool of applicants to U.S. graduate programs, she says, because those students are not competitive with their U.S. peers.“They are probably not English speakers and would have trouble passing the TOEFL [an assessment of English language skills],” she surmises. “So they might only get into a fourth-rate U.S. graduate program.” In contrast, she says, U.S. graduate programs have historically gotten “the cream of the crop” from China. And if a larger proportion of those students can build a career in China, fewer need apply to U.S. graduate programs.Few Indian undergraduatesThe numbers: India barely registers on a list of originating countries for U.S. undergraduates. Compared with China, home to 30% of all U.S. international undergrads, Indian students compose only 3% of the pool. And the overall total for 2013—12,677—actually reflects a drop of 0.5% from 2012.The reasons: Top-performing Indian students are well-served at the undergraduate level by the country’s network of elite technology institutes, known as IITs. India has also never had a strong connection to the United States at the undergraduate level, according to Blumenthal. In addition, she says, “many Indian parents are reluctant to send their girls abroad, especially at the undergraduate level.” By contrast, she says, China’s one-child-per-family rule has meant that they have “one shot at success, male or female.”Soaring graduate enrollment from IndiaThe numbers: The incoming class of Indian students for U.S. graduate programs is 27% larger this year than in 2013, according to CGS’s annual survey. And that increase follows a 40% jump in 2013 over 2012. However, CGS officials note that the Indian numbers have historically been more volatile than those from China; the increases for 2011 and 2012 were 2% and 1%, respectively.The reasons: U.S. graduate programs have benefited from several recent developments that, together, have opened the floodgates for Indian students. For starters, India’s investment in higher education hasn’t yet had much effect on graduate education, Blumenthal says. Unlike in China, she says, “in India there’s been very little effort to upgrade the quality of the faculty.”At the same time, it’s becoming harder for graduates of India’s universities to follow the traditional path of doing their further training in Britain or Australia, as many of their professors had done in previous generations. For the United Kingdom, tuition increases, visa restrictions, and a tightening of rules for those seeking work permits after college have all created greater barriers to entry, Blumenthal says. “It sends a message from the U.K. government that [it’s] not really interested in international students,” she says. “They are now regarded as simply another category of immigrants” rather than a valuable future source of intellectual capital.In Australia, Blumenthal notes, there’s a growing backlash against earlier government attempts to recruit more international students. “People think they let in too many,” she says. “They didn’t fit in, they didn’t speak English, and there was a perception that they were taking away jobs from Australians.”A recent strengthening of the rupee against the U.S. dollar has made U.S. graduate education more affordable for the middle class, she adds. And sluggish economic growth in India has meant fewer jobs for recent college graduates.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country According to IIE, 42% of the 886,000 international students at U.S. universities in 2013 to 2014 hailed from China and India. China makes up nearly three-fourths of that subtotal. In fact, the number of Chinese students equals the total from the next 12 highest ranking countries after India.This year’s IIE report also includes a look at 15-year trends. For example, foreign students compose only 8.1% of total U.S. enrollment, but their numbers have grown by 72% since 1999, making international students an increasingly important part of U.S. higher education.Their presence has long been visible within graduate programs in science and engineering fields, of course. But the new Open Doors report documents a surge in undergraduate enrollment from China, to the point where it almost equals the number of graduate students in the country—110,550 versus 115,727. In 2000, the ratio was nearly 1-to-6.Trying to understand such trends keeps university administrators up at night. And the more they know, the better they can be at anticipating the next trend. That’s why ScienceInsider turned to Peggy Blumenthal. She’s spent 30 years at IIE, most recently as senior counselor to its current president, Allan Goodman, and that longevity has given her a rich perspective on the ebb and flow of international students. Here is her perspective on what’s moving the needle for Chinese and Indian students. 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first_imgHow to tell whether that whiskey is fake As whiskey takes off in popularity around the globe, con artists aren’t far behind. Because their “sham drams”—cheap, blended whiskeys masquerading as expensive single-malt scotches—are hard to ID without a master distiller, teams of chemists have designed all sorts of methods for picking out the fakes. But they require deep knowledge of the liquor’s complex chemical constituents, something your average barfly isn’t likely to have. So a group of German researchers came up with a simpler approach: using fluorescent dyes to compare different drinks. The dyes, which are synthetically produced, give off different colors depending on the molecular makeup of the brew. Comparing 33 different whiskeys in a head-to-head competition, the team was able to classify the fluorescent signals into groups based on country of origin, blending status (single malt or blended), age, and taste (rich or light), the team writes today in Chem. The sensor can’t definitively identify a whiskey, but it can be used to compare a questionable sample to a known one. The same scientists have also used the fluorescent dyes to differentiate between white wines, fruit juices, drugs, and proteins, and they suggest such sensors could be used in the future to weed out counterfeits and impurities in foods, drinks, drugs, and perfumes. By Ryan CrossJun. 8, 2017 , 12:15 PMlast_img read more

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first_imgMisha Friedman Nigeria, Russia, and Florida seem like an odd set, but they all have one thing in common: growing caseloads of HIV. Science Staff Writer Jon Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about this week’s big read on how the fight against HIV/AIDS is evolving in these diverse locations.Sarah also talks with Armin Raznahan of the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Maryland, about his group’s work measuring which parts of the human brain are bigger in bigger brains. Adult human brains can vary as much as two times in size—and until now this expansion was thought to be evenly distributed. However, the team found that highly integrative regions are overrepresented in bigger brains, whereas regions related to processing incoming sensory information such as sight and sound tend to be underrepresented. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Listen to previous podcasts.[Image: Misha Friedman; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

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first_img By Mary BeckmanJan. 24, 2019 , 12:00 PM Juniors Bildarchiv GmbH/Alamy Stock Photo Mice, like people, like to be rocked to sleep Email Forget the running wheel. If your pet mouse is an insomniac, what it really needs is a hammock. New research shows that mice, just like humans, fall asleep faster with a gentle sway.Mild rocking helps both adults and children fall asleep faster and experience deeper, longer sleep. Scientists have suspected that the human vestibular system—the bits of the inner ear that keep us balanced and oriented in space—are involved, but there’s been no solid proof.So, in the new study, researchers put mouse cages on rocking platforms, monitored the animals’ brain activity, and measured how well they slept. The rodents slept 12% longer with rocking than without, and they fell asleep 51% faster if they had been sleep-deprived. But their brain signals did not indicate a deeper sleep. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The researchers did not look for a benefit of rocking on memory, which a related study suggests is a benefit for humans. The mice showed other differences from people as well; the rodents like to be rocked about four times faster than we do, for example. These differences might reflect the fact that mice carry their pups around in their mouths, which has a lulling effect, rather than rocking them in their arms like humans. But the researchers say it’s too early to speculate on shared evolutionary mechanisms.More intriguingly, mice that lacked a key part of the vestibular system called otoliths—teensy stones that sense linear acceleration—did not get any benefit at all from being rocked at bedtime, confirming the vestibular system’s central role in the effect, the team reports today in Current Biology.The results might lead to better noninvasive treatments for sleep disorders, the researchers say. For example, understanding how the brain uses the “rocking signal” to promote sleep might usher in alternatives such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, which uses electrical impulses to stimulate nerve cells and has been used to treat other brain disorders such as depression. But for now, you’re probably fine with a hammock.last_img read more

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first_imgFish, while being a delicious meal, can sometimes stink tremendously. If it’s not fresh enough, or worse, if a co-worker decides to microwave it in the office, the smell can be enough to make you gag. But for some cultures, fish that stinks to high heavens can be seen as a delicacy, such as the Swedish surströmming.This dish, served in a can, is a lightly-salted Baltic sea herring that has been fermented for at least six months.Opened can of surströmming in brine. Photo by Lapplaender CC BY-SA 3.0 deThe salt applied to the fish is barely enough to prevent it from rotting, which in turn creates one of the worst possible stenches inside of the can. In fact, a Japanese study that focused on measuring the stench of foods judged surströmming to be the smelliest food in the entire world!Special precautions must be made when eating surströmming, or else the smell emanating from the dish could make the eater, or those around the eater, sick to their stomach. Opening the can indoors would be a terrible idea, for the scent would quickly permeate the area and linger for far too long.Close up of herring fillet, out of a surstromming canThe pressure from the can creates a danger as well, for popping the can open could cause the brine to splash everywhere, soaking into clothing and the environment. The brine retains the full smell and can linger for quite some time. This is often why surströmming is opened when submerged in a bucket of cold water, as a way to prevent the spray from getting all over the place.Herring bussSurströmming is a bit of an acquired taste and for those who aren’t accustomed to the smell of the can, it can be rather overwhelming. One particular case of surströmming’s stench coming under fire was when a German landlord in 1981, discovered that one of his tenants was busy smearing a can of the stuff in the stairwell.This was done by the tenant to annoy one of the nearby neighbors, with whom they were embroiled in a petty feud. The scent was unbelievably atrocious and caused serious duress in those who were living in the building at the time.Close up of herring fillet, out of a surstromming canWith such a terrible smell emanating from the stairwell, the landlord sought to have his tenant evicted. Such an act was more than simple malfeasance — the terrible rotting smell of the brine continued to linger for quite some time. However, by throwing out the tenant, the landlord violated the tenants’ rights. In Germany, evicting an individual without notice is grounds for a lawsuit and as such, the landlord found himself taken to court.The landlord didn’t have too difficult of a time proving that his tenant’s vandalism warranted such a hasty removal. All he had to do was open a can of surströmming in the courtroom, no doubt causing the majority of people inside to gag and wish desperately to leave the premises as quickly as possible.Surströmming served on flatbread with boiled potatoes and salad.The courts, having been subjected to the same olfactory torture as the landlord’s tenants had been, quickly ruled in favor of the landlord. The smearing of the brine was too much of a crime to allow the tenant to stay.Surströmming, considered to be both a delicacy and a nuisance, is certainly nothing to mess with. Yet, with all of the negative publicity that the dish receives, from being banned in airports to evictions, there are some individuals who do enjoy the taste and have learned to stomach the smell of surströmming. They would argue that it tastes nothing like it smells.Read another story from us: The Restaurant Serving 40 Year-Old Beef StewAlthough in the words of one German critic, Wolfgang Fassbender “the biggest challenge when eating surströmming is to vomit only after the first bite, as opposed to before.” Bon appetite.last_img read more

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first_img LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? United States, Russia, US navy, US Russia Warship, Radio protest, Propaganda, World News, Indian Express “The U.S guided-missile cruiser Chancellorsville suddenly changed course and cut across the path of the destroyer Admiral Vinogradov coming within 50 meters of the ship,” the statement said.Russia and the United States blamed each other for a near collision between their warships in the East China Sea on Friday with both countries accusing one another of dangerous and unprofessional behavior. Related News Companies see climate change hitting their bottom lines in the next 5 years China says consumption growth likely to slow further this year Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Advertising By Reuters | Published: June 7, 2019 6:03:35 pm Best Of Express center_img “A protest over the international radio frequency was made to the commanders of the American ship who were warned about the unacceptable nature of such actions,” it said.That version of events was rejected by the U.S. Navy, which said the behavior of the Russian ship had been “unsafe and unprofessional”.“While operating in the Philippine Sea, a Russian Destroyer…made an unsafe man oeuvre against USS Chancellorsville,” U.S. Seventh Fleet spokesman Commander Clayton Doss said.“This unsafe action forced Chancellorsville to execute all engines back full and to maneuver to avoid collision.”He described a Russian assertion that the U.S. ship had acted dangerously as “propaganda”. What should happen to Confederate statues? A city auctions one for $1.4 million 0 Comment(s) Chandrayaan-2 to launch on July 22 at 2.43 pm: ISRO Advertising The Russian destroyer came within 50 to 100 feet of the Chancellorsville, he said, putting the safety of her crew and the ship at risk.The incident comes days after Washington and Moscow sparred over an allegedly unsafe spy plane intercept by a Russian fighter jet near Syria. Russia’s Pacific Fleet said that the USS Chancellorsville, a guided-missile cruiser, had come within just 50 meters (165 feet) of the Russian destroyer Admiral Vinogradov which had been forced to take emergency action to avoid a collision, Russian news agencies reported.They cited a Russian Pacific Fleet statement as saying the incident took place in the early hours of Friday morning in the eastern part of the East China Sea at a time when a group of Russian warships was on a parallel course with a U.S. naval strike group.The U.S guided-missile cruiser Chancellorsville suddenly changed course and cut across the path of the destroyer Admiral Vinogradov coming within 50 meters of the ship,” the statement said.last_img read more

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first_img Source:http://www.the-aps.org/mm/hp/Audiences/Public-Press/2018/74.html Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 29 2018New research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.Curcumin, a chemical that comes from the turmeric plant, has been used as a traditional Asian medicine for centuries, primarily to treat gastrointestinal ailments and skin wounds. Studies increasingly suggest that the compound may prevent or limit muscle wasting associated with a number of health conditions, including heart failure.Heart failure affects more than 6 million people living in the U.S. People with heart failure have a reduced function of the left ventricle–the chamber of the heart that pumps blood out to the rest of the body–called reduced ejection fraction. A decreased ability to exercise (exercise intolerance) is another significant characteristic of heart failure. Previous research has found that higher than normal levels of oxidative stress–an imbalance of two different kinds of molecules that can result in cell damage–contribute to exercise intolerance in people with heart failure. Heart failure is also associated with lower than normal expression of antioxidant enzymes in the muscles, but the reason for this is unclear. Antioxidant enzymes both prevent and repair damage from oxidative stress. Boosting enzyme levels may improve exercise performance in people in heart failure.Related StoriesExercise during pregnancy can promote bone health of both mother and childLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsWeightlifting is better for the heart than cardioResearchers from the University of Nebraska Medical Center theorized that a reduction in the normal signaling of Nrf2, a protein that regulates the expression of antioxidant enzymes, may play a role in the impaired expression of antioxidant enzymes. They examined the effects of curcumin, which is known to promote activation of Nrf2, on a mouse model of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. One group of mice with heart failure received daily doses of curcumin for 12 weeks, and another group did not receive treatment. The heart failure groups were compared to a control group of healthy mice that received curcumin and an untreated control group.The research team measured the exercise capacity of all the mice before and after curcumin treatment. The researchers also examined muscle fiber samples to assess enzyme expression levels. They found that expression of Nrf2 increased and levels of antioxidant enzymes improved in the animals with heart failure that were given curcumin. In addition, both groups that received curcumin–even the animals without heart failure–had improved exercise capacity when compared with the untreated groups, suggesting the effects of curcumin on skeletal muscle is not exclusive to heart failure.”These data suggest that activation of Nrf2 in skeletal muscle may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to improve … quality of life” in people with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the researchers wrote.last_img read more

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first_imgCapillary, blood vessel illustration. Image Credit: UGREEN 3S / Shutterstock By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJan 17 2019Researchers have now successfully created perfect blood vessels in the labs and this may be a huge step in benefitting people with diabetes and other conditions. The report of the procedure appears in a study titled, “Human blood vessel organoids as a model of diabetic vasculopathy,” published in the latest issue of the journal Nature. The researchers on the team from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of British Columbia, explain that diabetes causes abnormal thickening and damage to the blood vessels. This thickening occurs in the “basement membrane” part of the blood vessel, they explain. Because of this thickening there is impaired transfer of nutrients and oxygen from the blood vessels to the tissues and the cells surrounding it. This leads to the complications commonly seen among diabetics including eye disease, blindness, heart disease, strokes and kidney damage.The team used stem cells to make them grow on “organoids” to become blood vessels. Stem cells or pluripotent cells in the body have the capacity to turn into any cell given the right triggers. The organoids are the three dimensional structures that are similar to organs. These act as a frame or scaffold for the blood vessels to grow upon.These lab grown blood vessels are now placed within a petri dish to mimic an environment of diabetes. Soon they found that these blood vessels showed a thickening of the basement membranes. This was similar to what happens to blood vessels of diabetes explained Reiner Wimmer a postdoctoral research fellow at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, who was one of the researchers on the team. The team then looked for a chemical that could prevent this thickening of the membrane and found that an inhibitor of the enzyme γ-secretase could do the trick. Researcher Josef Penninger explained that this inhibition of γ-secretase seemed to prevent the blood vessel damage and this could prove to be a new area of therapy for diabetics.Related StoriesHealthy blood vessels could help stave off cognitive declineRadiometer’s ABL9 blood gas analyzer awarded Red Dot Design AwardMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorThe team believes that this research would benefit not only diabetes research but also other disease conditions where blood vessels are involved in the disease process. Penninger in a statement said, “Being able to build human blood vessels as organoids from stem cells is a game changer… Every single organ in our body is linked with the circulatory system. This could potentially allow researchers to unravel the causes and treatments for a variety of vascular diseases from Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, wound healing problems, stroke, cancer and, of course, diabetes.” Wimmer also said, “What is so exciting about our work is that we were successful in making real human blood vessels out of stem cells… Our organoids resemble human capillaries to a great extent, even on a molecular level, and we can now use them to study blood vessel diseases directly on human tissue.”Diabetes affects 420 million people across the world and is fast becoming the leading cause of death and disability. Long term diabetes causes damage to almost all the major organs of the body. This is caused mainly due to the persistently elevated blood glucose levels.center_img Source:https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0858-8last_img read more

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first_img Source:St. Michael’s Hospital Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 3 2019Countries’ essential medicines lists vary from one another and from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) model list, pointing to a potential need for greater care in selecting medicines that best meet the health care priorities of a population, suggests a study led by Toronto’s St. Michael’s Hospital.Published in the World Health Organization Bulletin, the research analyzes 137 countries that use essential medicines lists to inform government and health-care institutions in determining which medicines to fund, stock, prescribe and dispense.Dr. Nav Persaud, a scientist at St. Michael’s Hospital’s MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions, and a team of researchers from Oxford University and the WHO, found that countries’ lists varied from one another and from the WHO’s model list of medications. These differences were often not explained by the basic characteristics of countries, such as region and size of economy, or differences in health needs. Of the 2,068 unique medicines identified by Dr. Persaud and his team, most were listed by only 10 per cent of the countries. Countries must select medicines for their essential medicines lists appropriately, in order to facilitate sustainable, equitable access to medicines, and to promote their appropriate use. Differences between lists that are not explained by country characteristics may represent opportunities for improvement.”Dr. Nav Persaud, a scientist at St. Michael’s Hospital’s MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutionscenter_img Related StoriesStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaDifferences between national lists also extended to countries that are geographically close and similar, inconsistent with the researchers’ expectation that countries with similar health-care needs, expenditures and status would select similar medicines.In addition to a lack of consistency between countries, medicines listed by some countries had been withdrawn by others due to harmful effects, the team found.To identify patterns, Dr. Persaud and his team also compared each of the national lists with the WHO’s model list of essential medicines. They found disparities, with most national lists containing more than 200 differences when compared with the WHO’s model list.Further research may identify explanations, such as differences in the processes for selecting appropriate and effective medicines, said Dr. Persaud.”Such information may help governments decide if medicines on their lists should be removed or if other medicines should be added,” he said. “These results may identify opportunities to improve essential medicines lists and promote appropriate use of medicines in support of universal health coverage.”Dr. Persaud and his team compiled their results into an interactive online database. Countries can now see how their essential medicines lists differ from other countries by visiting essentialmeds.org.last_img read more

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first_imgRelated StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new study”One way is to better understand the risks and impacts of extreme temperatures, to use alternative strategies to keep cool and warm during extreme temperatures, such as leaving the house more to keep cool and warm. Having more social contacts (i.e. neighbours, family, friends) can help older people reduce social isolation and enable them to exchange advice regarding extreme temperatures. There are ways to make their homes more comfortable during extreme temperatures that they may not be aware of, such as schemes that help older people to pay their electricity or gas bills. And being more aware of the risks that heat and cold might pose to them because of specific health conditions they might have.”Everyone can do something at any age. If you are more aware of the risks around you and if you obtain information from health professionals or family members, you’ll definitely be more prepared to deal with these kinds of events.”The assessments will be useful to researchers, policymakers and practitioners in local authorities and health and social care providers, to help them understand the causes of vulnerability and how an individual’s vulnerability varies depending on different risks they are exposed to. This will in turn help tackle the most important factors shaping vulnerability, as well as to plan and implement strategies to reduce vulnerability.Dr Nunes adds: “These findings also have implications for improving public health policy and practice. As they highlighted high levels of trust and support older people receive from their local authority, there are opportunities for an integrated approach where health and social care professionals, housing officers and city planners work together under the ‘same roof’ using a person- or community-centred approach to provide advice and care to the whole population, not only to older people, for reducing vulnerability to extreme temperatures.”What I’ve tried to do by using an assets-based approach is to depict which factors have more impact on vulnerability, particularly where it concerns mortality or morbidity. Using physical, human, financial, social and place-based assets allows you to depict for certain individuals what specific factors are making them vulnerable.”Acting on each of these types of assets to reduce vulnerability is possible but we need to be proactive and not wait for older people to ask for help.” Source:University of WarwickJournal reference:Nunes, R A. et al. (2019) General and specified vulnerability to extreme temperatures among older adults. Journal of Environmental Health Research. doi.org/10.1080/09603123.2019.1609655 Just because an individual may be older doesn’t necessarily mean they are more vulnerable. We need to look at the different facets of their lives, the different assets available to them and the things that are within their own control. There are a lot of things that individuals can do to reduce their vulnerability.” Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 26 2019Efforts to support older people during extreme heat should focus on those who lack independence or have pre-existing health issues, according to an expert from the University of Warwick.New research shows that having locations where older people can keep cool plays a key role in reducing their vulnerability to extreme heat, but that older people may find them difficult to access or have limited ability to travel to them.It comes as countries in Europe are experiencing a potentially record-breaking heatwave this week.Dr Raquel Nunes from Warwick Medical School has developed a new assessment to quantify an individual’s vulnerability to extreme hot and cold weather based upon their personal situation and resources. Detailed in a recent paper for the International Journal of Environmental Health Research, it reveals that vulnerability to temperature extremes can vary by individual, but there are factors that are more significant than others.Older adults (aged 65+) are considered a high risk group to the impacts of extreme temperatures. Direct and indirect effects of heatwaves and cold waves are associated with an increase in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and impact on the mortality and morbidity of older adults.Most existing definitions and assessments of vulnerability examine general risks for older adults, but few focus on specific issues such as hot or cold weather.Using an asset-based approach, Dr Nunes developed a General Vulnerability Index to establish the everyday vulnerabilities for older adults. This used a broad mix of human, financial, physical, place-based and social assets, such as health status, quality of life, education level, age of their home, access to public services, and others.She then developed Specified Vulnerability Assessments for cold weather and heatwaves that assessed factors that specifically related to vulnerability to those two risks, such as income constraints, lack of housing insulation, lack of heating and cooling devices.Using data obtained through interviews with older adults living in Lisbon, Portugal, Dr Nunes found that there can be different levels of general and specified vulnerability for the same person – so an individual might have a high general vulnerability, but at the same time have low vulnerability to extreme heat and high vulnerability to extreme cold.In particular, increased pressure on financial (i.e. income, pensions), human (i.e. health status and health literacy) and physical assets (i.e. lack of housing insulation) of the individual were found to have the most significant effect on their vulnerability. This reflects their ability to take action to keep cool or warm during heatwaves and cold weather.Dr Raquel Nunes, Senior Research Fellow, Warwick Medical School:last_img read more

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first_imgDespite its popularity, the Autolib car-sharing system in Paris has chalked up heavy losses Electric scooters launch in Paris, to spread in Europe © 2018 AFP The city of Paris is pulling the plug on an electric car-sharing system once hailed as the future of urban transport, with officials voting to cancel the contract in the face of mounting losses. Explore furthercenter_img The more than 4,000 silver Autolib hatchbacks had become a fixture on the streets of the French capital, with docking stations for the electric vehicles found every few blocks.But even after winning over some 150,000 subscribers, the system has failed to prove economically viable—despite promises by its operator, the Bollore Group, that once fully deployed it wouldn’t cost a cent to the city.Last month the conglomerate, which used the scheme to showcase its electric battery technology told officials they would have to pay 46 million euros ($54 million) a year for the next five years to cover an expected deficit of 294 million euros.Socialist Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo called the request “preposterous”, and lawmakers in Paris and the suburbs participating in the scheme voted Thursday to cancel the contract immediately instead of letting it run out in 2023 as planned.Bollore, which says it faces a 60-million-euro bill itself, has said it will now take the city to court.Raft of optionsAutolib subscribers raved about its ease of use and affordability.Yet each car was used on average just 4.5 times a day in 2016—the most recent year for which data is available—not enough to cover the costs of maintaining the fleet.The system also struggled to match supply with demand, since cars picked up in high-traffic areas are often parked where fewer people are looking for them.The arrival of ride-hailing services like Uber and electric moped rentals in recent years siphoned off users as well.”People living in urban centres have become multi-modal: they are increasingly switching from one form of transportation to another,” said Nicolas Louvet of 6t, a consulting firm specialising in transport.Paris has vowed to find replacement car-sharing systems, and in the meantime has said the more than 3,200 docking stations in the city will be made available to owners of electric cars.But that’s cold comfort for the roughly 250 Autolib employees at risk of losing their jobs.The company’s failure is the latest in a series of transportation headaches for Hidalgo, already taking heat over the bungled change of operator for the city’s flagship bike-sharing system Velib, which resulted in a huge shortage of bikes.Her decision to close off major roads along the Seine river to traffic has also infuriated many drivers, who say she has simply made traffic jams worse.”There is a major problem with mobility options in Paris,” the centre-right national government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux, tipped as a candidate for mayor in 2020 elections, told Radio Classique. Citation: Paris slams brakes on electric car-sharing scheme (2018, June 22) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-paris-slams-electric-car-sharing-scheme.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img The state of Kansas and Black & Veatch are helping.Black & Veatch, an Overland Park-based engineering firm, is working with the Kansas Department of Transportation on a federal initiative announced in May by U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao. Kansas is one of several sites chosen for a federal pilot program that will help determine whether federal regulations could be eased to boost use of drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles, in rural areas. Kansas and other pilot sites could inform future Federal Aviation Administration regulations.”As drones become more mainstream with their versatility, these projects in Kansas and elsewhere are key in testing all applications of these unmanned aircraft systems and, if successful, may ease airspace rules for everyone’s betterment,” said Jamare Bates, head of Black & Veatch’s unmanned aerial vehicle, or UAS, operations.Black & Veatch said in a press release that it will help test drones beyond the line of site of the operator, which is currently barred by the FAA. Testing will focus on inspecting infrastructure and improving precision in agriculture by helping farmers better use seeds, pesticides and fertilizer.”A drone’s promise of giving a bird’s eye view of any problematic area of cropland—and getting (drone)-delivered treatment for it—comes at a time when producers face mounting pressure to meet food demand,” the release says.Drones also could help farmers take high-definition images or video of assets, inspect fields and gather data. ©2018 The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Mo.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Explore further Amazon eyes defense against hijacking of delivery drones by ‘nefarious individuals’ Citation: Company to experiment with drones in federal pilot (2018, July 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-company-drones-federal.html With the prospect of Amazon and UPS drones dropping packages at your door and farmers surveying their fields from above, federal aviation officials are looking to experiment with looser airspace regulations. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img Explore further It calls for a 3.0 percent tax on online advertising, sales of user data and online platforms.The tax will be levied on companies with annual revenues of over 750 million euros worldwide, and at least 3.0 million in Spain.In Italy, a “web tax” of 3.0 percent was adopted by lawmakers last year but the new government has changed tack and said it prefers to wait for EU-wide regulation.Talks have been ongoing on a European level since March.The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, has proposed a 3.0 percent tax on tech giants while an international solution is being worked on by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.But the need for unanimity on an EU level makes progress difficult.Several countries are opposed to the project, most notably Ireland where several tech giants have their European bases.In Asia, Singapore has announced a digital tax but its effect is limited. India is also working on a tax on tech giants, while Malaysia is expected to unveil its own proposals on Friday.”In this complicated landscape, people have contradictory interests and therefore contradictory positions,” said Pascal Saint-Amans, head of the OECD’s tax policy and administration centre.’Unfair treatment’A Europe-wide tax was originally called for by Germany during its presidency of the G20 starting in December 2016, Saint-Amans told AFP, but then US president Barack Obama refused to discuss it.Under President Donald Trump, the US administration has shown “active and engaged support” on the issue, he said.Saint-Amans said that “the global solution would be to change all tax regimes, including in the United States, China and Japan… to be able to tax a company that has no physical presence in your country”.As the world waits, European tech companies like Spotify, Booking.com and Zalando have expressed serious concern about a possible EU tax in a letter to European finance ministers made public on Tuesday.They argued that big US tech firms could absorb the costs, while European ones would struggle, warning that a digital services tax “will have a disproportionate impact on European companies, resulting in unfair treatment”. The announcement was made in a budget speech on Monday by finance minister Philip Hammond, who said: “The UK has been leading attempts to deliver international corporate tax reform for the digital age.”A new global agreement is the best long-term solution. But progress is painfully slow. We cannot simply talk forever.”So we will now introduce a UK Digital Services Tax,” Hammond added.Chancellor of the Exchequer Hammond said Britain would at the same time continue to engage with international partners to come up with a new global agreement, saying this was “the best long-term solution”.Zuckerberg as DraculaThe 2.0-percent tax levy on sales made by large digital companies in Britain would apply to search engines, social networks and e-commerce channels, the UK Treasury said.There has been public outrage over relatively low levels of tax paid in Britain by giants such as Amazon, Facebook and Google.Hammond said the tax would apply to companies with more than £500 million (561 million euros, $638 million) in global revenues and was expected to raise £400 million a year from 2022.The announcement in the week of Halloween prompted The Sun tabloid to report the news with photo-montage depicting Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg as Dracula.The paper said Hammond had “put the bite on tech giants sucking the lifeblood from British high streets”.Experts have warned about the potential impact of the tax.”It’s a very bold and surprising move,” said Tej Parikh, a senior economist at the Institute of Directors, told the BBC.”There’s always a risk you could hamper the competitiveness of the country,” he said.’Modernise tax rules’Some smaller economies have announced similar initiatives.Spain’s socialist government earlier this month approved a tax on big internet companies as part of its 2019 budget, hoping to raise up to 1.2 billion euros ($1.4 billion) next year.The tax, which still requires parliamentary approval, will “modernise tax rules” for 21st-century businesses, Finance Minister Maria Jesus Montero told reporters following a weekly cabinet meeting. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: UK ratchets up pressure on US tech giants with new tax (2018, October 30) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-uk-ratchets-pressure-tech-giants.html © 2018 AFP Britain could become the first major world economy to impose a specific tax on tech giants, as international negotiations to overhaul analog-era global tax regulations drag on. Dark clouds on the horizon for tech companies in Britain Spain backs new tax on internet giants in budget planlast_img read more

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first_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL SHARE The sun sets on Kalaignar COMMENT PM Modi pays homage to Karunanidhi August 08, 2018 Earth movers arrive at Anna Memorial. Photo: Velankanni Raj   –  The Hindu DMK leader M Karunanidhi will be buried at the Marina Beach, next to his mentor Anna. He also join AIADMK leaders MGR and J Jayalalithaa to get a place at the Marina Beach.Madras High Court this morning allowed allotment of place on the Marina Beach for burial of DMK leader M Karunanidhi, who died last evening following prolonged illness. He was 94.The court directed the State Government to allot land at the Marina Beach.The Division Bench comprising Acting Chief Justice Huluvadi G Ramesh and Justice SS Sundar passed the order on a writ petition filed by DMK’s RS Bharathi, which was taken up last night up for urgent hearing and adjourned for further hearing this morning.On hearing the news, Karunanidhi’s son MK Stalin broke down and thanked thousands of mourners with folded handed who visited Rajaji Hall to pay their respects to Karunanidhi. #DMK has sought land for #Karunanidhi between #AnnaMemorial and #JayalalithaaMemorial (under construction). Government officials along with senior #DMK leaders at #MarinaBeach for land allotment @businessline pic.twitter.com/qAZq5IopTD— Thirumalai Echambadi Raja Simhan (@terajasimhan) August 8, 2018 The petition challenged last night’s press release issued by Tamil Nadu Chief Secretary Girija Vaidyanathan that said due to various cases in the Madras High Court, the State government was unable to allot space in Marina to cremate Karunanidhi. Instead the Government was willing to give land near Rajaji Memorial and Gandhi Mandapam opposite Anna University in Adyar.When the hearing continued this morning, counsel for the petitioner, P Wilson, argued that a leader who was five times Chief Minister of  the State deserves space in the Marina.Wilson referred to Article 21 that said “no person shall be deprived of his life or personal liberty except according to procedure established by law comes,” for a place in Marina.CS Vaidyanathan, Counsel for Tamil Nadu argued that the DMK was pursuing political agenda by filing this case. Dravida Kazhagam leader Periyar was the tallest leader of Dravidian movement. ‘Was he buried at Marina beach?’ he argued.#DMK petition filed in the #MadrasHighCourt seeking a place in #Marina for #Karunanithi @businessline pic.twitter.com/8xLaOiFZUj— Thirumalai Echambadi Raja Simhan (@terajasimhan) August 8, 2018 RELATED Published on Tamil Nadu COMMENTS Karunanidhi enters 50th year as DMK chief judiciary (system of justice) politicslast_img read more

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first_img Alibaba Cloud India has signed an agreement with the Andhra Pradesh Economic Development Board to leverage Ali Cloud’s ET city brain solution for sustainable farming through smart technologies, integrated traffic management, smart city management, small and medium enterprises and skill development programmes.Alex Li, MD of Alibaba Cloud India, and the Andhra Pradesh Economic Development Board CEO, J Krishna Kishore, exchanged the MoU in the presence of Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naidu at his residence in Undavalli on Tuesday morning.Alibaba Cloud is going to help MSMEs establish online presence and to enable online payments. The group is likely to extend co-operation in real time governance. Published on COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL Andhra Pradesh August 28, 2018 software SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more

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first_imgBJP Three West Bengal MLAs, including BJP leader Mukul Roy’s son Subhrangshu Roy, joined the saffron party on Tuesday as it works to consolidate its position in the state following its impressive show there in the Lok Sabha polls.Subhrangshu Roy was suspended by the TMC for his “anti-party” activities after the general election results were announced.They joined the BJP at the party’s headquarters here in the presence of BJP general secretary Kailash Vijaywargiya and Mukul Roy. TMC’s Tusharkanti Bhattacharya and CPI(M)’s Debendra Nath Roy were the other MLAs from the state who joined the saffron party along with several councillors, BJP leader Anil Baluni said. Mukul Roy is seen to be instrumental in engineering the defection of TMC leaders to the BJP and, political watchers believe, he is one of the key architects of the party’s best ever show in West Bengal, where TMC president Mamata Banerjee is in power since 2011. In the Lok Sabha polls, the TMC fell to 22 seats from 34, while the BJP’s tally zoomed to 18 from two. May 28, 2019 West Bengal COMMENTS Published on SHARE SHARE EMAIL parties and movements BJP leader Mukul Roy’s son Subhrangshu Roy   –  The Hindu SHARE COMMENTlast_img read more

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