January 23, 2021
  • 9:38 am Gov. Cuomo Issues Executive Order Requiring All To Wear Face Masks
  • 9:37 am Chautauqua County Unemployment Rate Reaches All-Time High
  • 9:35 am Officials Announce COVID-19 Outbreak At Chautauqua County Business
  • 7:45 am This Week’s Picks: Laura Osnes, Hedwig, Cabaret & More!
  • 7:44 am Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Eyeing Broadway First for School of Rock

first_img Share Share Submit Sportradar combats social media abuse with player protection solution August 17, 2020 Related Articles StumbleUpon Björn Nilsson: How Triggy is delivering digestible data through pre-set triggers August 28, 2020 Alberto Alfieri: Leading the way for Gamingtec’s B2C growth August 25, 2020 Europe’s premier ice hockey competition, the Champions Hockey League (CHL), has signed a long term partnership with Sportradar for its expert integrity insights.The sports data, insight and analysis provider is to work together with the CHL, which pits the leading sides from the top tier of leagues across the continent against each other each year, in order to best safeguard the competition from manipulation and betting fraud.Martin Baumann, CHL Chief Executive Officer, added: “Our fans demand hard but fair competition and that cannot happen without integrity. As we set about finding the right partner to support us in this area, we were clear that we needed to work with most respected name in the field. The road led us to Sportradar and their Integrity Services. “We are delighted to bring them into the CHL family and it gives us great comfort and confidence to know that they are on hand to help and advise.”Sportradar details that it is to deliver a combination of monitoring and detection services, intelligence and investigation insights and a series of education and prevention workshops. The organisation is already partnered with the International Ice Hockey Federation, in addition to the German Deutsche Eishockey Liga and the North American NHL.Andreas Krannich, Managing Director of Integrity Services at Sportradar, said: “Creating the systems and tools to properly and credibly support any sport takes a lot of investment and expertise and we are humbled that the top rights owners in ice-hockey worldwide recognise and appreciate that. “The CHL pitches the best in Europe against each other to crown the number one team on the continent, doing our bit to help protect this proud competition is a great honour and we thank CHL for their trust”.last_img read more

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first_img Related Articles Share bet-at-home maintains 2020 outlook despite dire opening  May 4, 2020 Submit StumbleUpon Share mybet returns with Deutsche Eishockey play-off sponsorship March 6, 2020 Flutter strengthens igaming offering with CasinoEngine December 17, 2019 The governance of Frankfurt Xetra-listed betting group mybet Holdings SE has today issued a corporate update informing investors that it has filed for ‘open insolvency proceedings’.The insolvency update follows mybet governance failure to sell the business to an undisclosed investor, as previously reported in July 2018.This Friday, governance will file its insolvency application for three syndicated companies, of which mybet forms part of.In its update, mybet’s board further informs investors, that it owes circa €4 million in sports betting taxes to the German tax office.The betting group details that it had its request for a temporary tax suspension, denied by Frankfurt courts.“The background for the application for the opening of insolvency proceedings is the failure of discussions with potential investors. Today, the discussions with a strategic investor reported by ad-hoc on the 13th July regarding the possible sale of the online business of mybet Holding SE under the domain www.mybet.com were closed.These talks failed due to conditions set by the investors which could not be fulfilled” details mybet in its corporate update.last_img read more

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first_img StumbleUpon Related Articles Submit GVC Foundation backs Eastern European Championship tennis appeal June 17, 2020 With the launch of its new sportsbook, VSODDS.BET is aiming to place a greater focus on betting traders, offering only pre-match, fixed odds to players in core markets around the world.The Curaçao-licensed operator offers odds and markets across a wide range of sports, including Football, Tennis, Golf, Basketball, Formula One, American Football, Ice Hockey and Handball, with more to be added in the coming months. To ensure it provides the most competitive odds, the operator has assembled a specialist team of expert traders, and also relies on state-of-the-art technologies and data feeds. Dalius Dabashinskas, founder of VSODDS.BET, commented: “We are entering the market as a disrupter and a leader. There are a huge number of sportsbooks available to players, but they all offer the same odds and markets.“VSODDS.BET is bringing back the dark art of bookmaking and will engage punters who like to take a more considered approach to their wagering with a unique and quality product that they can trust.“Of course, operators have historically been cautious of offering pre-match odds, but we have a brilliant team of traders and believe we can strike the right balance between providing added value to players while also balancing risk from our end.”Players can deposit and withdraw via all the major payment gateways, including debit and credit card, Visa and Mastercard, Skrill and Bank Transfer, without incurring any fees. VSODDS.BET also promises players super-fast transaction times. Stats Perform extends NBL data and streaming deal July 13, 2020 Sportradar: Football’s match fixers enter the betting early June 19, 2020 Share Sharelast_img read more

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first_img Submit Share Gambling content developer Spiffbet has teamed up with Jokerbet to unveil the fun, in-play Take5 live game to the Spanish market. Rebranded as Joker-5 to enhance its appeal in Spain, the innovative, mobile game, allows players to select a match and bet if they think a goal will be scored in the next five-minute period.The launch comes after Spiffbet was recognised for the Best Virtual Sports/Game Innovation at last week’s SBC Awards ceremony in London. Lennart Gillberg, CEO of Spiffbet, commented: “We are delighted to go live with Jokerbet, a major presence in Spain, both land-based and online. We look forward to exploring a range of opportunities with this established brand.“The timing for this launch is perfect, just before Christmas when everyone is feeling festive, games are on and everyone is out socialising and having fun.“Due to the simplistic nature of the game, everyone can get involved and play.”Jorge Justicia, CEO at Jokerbet, added: “We have big plans for the Joker-5 game as we consider the concept to work well as an acquisition, retention and cross-sell too, but the fun nature of the game will also create a buzz socially.“We are looking forward to launching additional games soon.”The technology was originally launched at last year’s Betting on Football, and was designed as a simple proposition for new players, bridging the gap between casino players who are usually more ‘fun oriented’ and bettors more apt at interpreting the odds. Andy McCue returns to betting with Betsson AB June 22, 2020 Related Articles GiG lauds its ‘B2B makeover’ delivering Q2 growth August 11, 2020 StumbleUpon Betsson outrides pandemic challenges as regulatory dramas loom July 21, 2020 Sharelast_img read more

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first_imgShare GentingBet streamlines web and mobile platforms with revamp May 15, 2020 Related Articles Submit Share StumbleUpon SBC Magazine Issue 8: International expansion and picking up the sporting slack April 7, 2020 GentingBet secures North American racing boost with XB Net July 22, 2020 Online sports betting operator GentingBet, (Genting Malaysia)  has planned to expand its European profile by applying for a Spanish casino and sports betting licence.The operator intends on going live in the market by the end of this year. The move comes after a company statement revealed that GentingBet was well positioned for expanding into the Spanish market.Jeremy Taylor, Managing Director of Genting Online praised the expansion plans and said:  “Gambling is an important part of Spanish culture. The country is of significant size, has one of the highest per capita spend in Europe and has consistently grown during the past 10 years or so.“Genting is a huge global business with a significant UK casino estate and has big ambitions for its mobile, live casino and sportsbook products. We believe GentingBet’s wonderful heritage, social responsibility focus, live casino expertise and comprehensive betting and gaming suite will resonate well in Spain – as it will other European markets. “Having recently opened our new Interactive Headquarters in Malta, we are now perfectly placed to capitalise on the opportunity that the European online market presents.“We have therefore taken advantage of the one-year window offered to operators and submitted the application to Spain’s Dirección General de Ordenación del Juego (DJOJ) regulatory body. If successful, we hope to roll out in Q4 of 2019.”The Genting Group launched its first online casino in 2008, while the Genting Bet sports book was launched in 2013. It has over 50 years of gaming experience and covering all main product verticals such as casino, live casino and sports betting.Genting Casino UK announced it was restructuring its gambling division in 2018, having appointed Alison Brincat as the group’s new affiliate marketing lead, as well as Jeremy Taylor as interactive managing director.last_img read more

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first_img StumbleUpon The British Horseracing Authority (BHA) has made the decision to halt all horse racing across British racecourses on 7 February following the outbreak of Equine Influenza, casting worries about this year’s Cheltenham Festival.The shut down follows the Animal Health Trust confirming three positive cases of the virus in vaccinated horses at an active race yard. Horses from the infected yard have since raced at Ayr and Ludlow following the discovery, which poses a potential exposure risk to a significant number of horses from yards across the UK and Ireland.However with Cheltenham just next month, there are worries that a long term halt to horseracing might be necessary.The Cheltenham Festival in 2001 was cancelled amid a Foot and Mouth Outbreak that stopped horseracing for months.Veterinarians are concerned that the influenza virus has been discovered in vaccinated horses which casts doubts over the welfare and ability to contain the illness. The action to cancel racing as been welcomed as a necessary decision to restrict, as much as possible, the further spread of equine influenza.Officials from the BHA have conducted investigations into which yards may have been exposed and to identify the necessary further actions. The horseracing body is currently in discussions with the yards that may have been exposed to ensure that measures are put in place to ensure appropriate quarantine and biosecurity.The BHA stated: “The full extent of potential exposure is unknown and we are working quickly to understand as much as we can to assist our decision making. The BHA is working closely with the Animal Health Trust and will issue a further update tomorrow. “We recommend that any trainer who has concerns about the health status of any of their horses should contact their veterinarian.”An outbreak of the virus rocked the Australian racing industry in 2007 when a nationwide ban was issued to restrict the movement of horses for 72 hours. As a result, Sydney’s spring racing carnival was cancelled, with horse-related activities not resuming fully for months later.Since the announcement, Wolverhampton has cancelled its race meeting for Saturday 9 February. Unibet backs #GoRacingGreen as lead racing charity  July 28, 2020 UK Racing pushes for drastic levy reforms as deep recession looms August 25, 2020 Submit Share Share Related Articles ITV secures three-year British racing broadcast deal August 5, 2020last_img read more

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first_imgThis week, the Rt Rev Alan Smith upped the ante by suggesting that a levy be instituted to recapture the £1.2bn alleged cost of gambling harms to the NHS. We don’t currently know how much the gambling industry contributes to research, education and treatment (as contrary to myth, GambleAware does not enjoy a funding monopoly) but guess it is likely to be in the region of £12m on a voluntary basis. This rises to  around £30m once regulatory settlements have been added – although a large chunk of these funds are currently unspent. It seems likely therefore that – at least with respect to problem gambling treatment services – current funding is inadequate; but there is a variety of views about what the figure should be. A final GB-specific impact is that the Commission is likely to be watching for breaches very closely. Implementation time is relatively short (albeit the required systems are essentially already in place) and for many operators this will represent a commercial requirement to change marketing strategy at just as much as a regulatory requirement to change verification processes. Mistakes are almost bound to occur, but the regulator is unlikely to be lenient on such a high profile (and essentially common sense) issue. If there was one licensing change likely to catch operators out and have them in licence review territory, we would say this was it. StumbleUpon Finally, the UK has been a posterchild of liberal fiscal-regulatory regimes. This change follows a series of tax rises and (voluntary) advertising restrictions which collectively thoroughly test the central premise of the hyper-liberal model. If gambling operators wanted to point to the UK as a haven of effective self-regulation based upon operators commercially incentivised to behave themselves, then this latest change erodes that position further. The key to a liberal regime surviving the test was a mature licensee environment (in the sense of behaviour) – the series of increasingly severe interventions in the world’s most mature online gambling market (in the sense of development) demonstrates that we are still not there yet. In our view this makes both existing liberal regimes increasingly under threat, while the likelihood of newly regulating POC markets choosing open licensing and light regulation is also diminishing. The bishop’s proposal goes substantially further but poses a number of questions. The £1.2bn figure is derived from a report produced by the Institute for Public Policy Research in 2016, which concluded that the range of costs to the NHS from gambling harms was likely to be in the range of £260m to £1.2bn. So how certain are we about the true level of costs – and should we automatically pick the top end of the range? Submit Australia: horseracing – jiggery-pokeryRacehorse trainer Darren Weir has been excluded from racing for four years following an investigation into misconduct by Racing Victoria – notably his admittance to the use of tasers known as ‘jiggers’ in training for the purpose of increasing performance. The high-profile arrest, by Victoria Police, of Weir and two others connected with his business on betting related corruption allegations resulted in no charges pending further investigation. The main issue for racing fans and bookmakers is likely to be how long this lasts and particularly whether Cheltenham will be put at risk (either abandoned or with a materially restricted number of runners). Cheltenham was last fully cancelled in 2001 due to Foot and Mouth, which also disrupted racing for c. five weeks. Tellingly at that time UK retail bookmakers were able to show international racing, dogs and virtuals – and more than covered the gap with higher margin products: retail betting revenue actually grew YoY during the period for all the major operators. However, back then even though racing was a bigger part of betting, bookmakers were also much more on the front foot (with FOBTs in their infancy and the bookie-Treasury delivered tax change to GPT soon to be implemented) – now, the tools to mitigate are probably stronger but the operational ability is probably (relatively) weaker, especially in retail. Nevertheless, bookmakers are likely to suffer far less (if at all) than racing even with a disruption period measured in weeks, putting further pressure on the long-term value outlook picture rights (with a ‘fair test’ black out vs LCL/BF’s partial competitive disadvantage) and raising the stakes further both on moves to broaden the base of the Levy to international racing and the outcome of the current IP-related court battle between ARC and SIS.Racing is still a very valuable betting product, but if the bookmaker trading results due to the impact of equine flu are anything close to Foot and Mouth, then focus on providing a really high quality betting product vs. expecting value to be transferred for legacy or political favour reasons will be all the more crucial to racing’s future, in our view. Germany is currently one of the most lucrative markets in Europe, though Novomatic (B2C and B2B) and Gauselmann (B2B) pulled out of online operations early last year. The best hope for the sector remains confusion and fudge in our view: any German regulatory model likely to get broad support across the Laender really is likely to look like the twilight of the gods… The GB Gambling Commission has confirmed a tightening of age verification rules for licensees to protect minors. From 7 May (three months), licensees will need to age verify all players either through a third party of by direct ID checks before allowing customers to deposit or even play free games or use bonuses. This replaces a far less strict verification minimum of 72 hours after withdrawing, with no requirements on play. These changes merely codify best practice for some operators (although it would represent a material change if the rule were to be retrospective on all current actives vs. new customers), but it is likely to represent a significant change for many licensees and, especially, customer user experience. We believe that this change will have three important impacts on the GB market and a potentially significant one on wider regulatory development: growth is likely to slow further, organic consolidation is likely to increase, licence risk has almost certainly increased, and; (potentially) liberal regimes are likely to be increasingly thinking twice about avoiding strenuous regulatory interventions.We estimate that the GC’s change will have about a 2ppt impact on GB remote growth – a figure that would have been marginal only a couple of years ago, but now represents a material delta on waning demand. The cause of this slowdown is not in driving behavioural change in the majority of customers, which it is unlikely to, in our view, but in the habits of the heavier user, in gaming especially. Trying a near unheard of casino on a whim / in response to a big sign-up bonus is the reason why heavier users often have more than a dozen accounts each. Equally, casinos with low levels of brand development and product differentiation (most, by far), tend to have material gaps down in signup to deposit and then first-time depositors to continued play (over 50% of ‘actives’ is not uncommon). This spend was easy to come by in the old regime and few players would bother to withdraw their depleted balances (and those that did might find it unnecessarily difficult as a ‘retention tool’). That cycle is now, if not broken, sufficiently disrupted as to diminish that level of ‘over-trading’ significantly. On the other hand, the ‘Hot Shoes’ initiative (where members of the Commission team spend time work-shadowing licensees) has been warmly welcomed along with last year’s collaboration workshops (which have yielded some impressive research). Strategic consultancy, Regulus Partners, focused on international gambling and related industries, taking a look at some of the key challenges the gambling industry faces in its ‘Winning Post’ Column.UK: gambling regulation – nothing minor about age verification changes Share The new interim CEO of the Remote Gambling Association, Wes Himes voiced a widely-held view when he publicly criticised the regulator for its decision not to attend the annual gathering of licensees, suppliers, regulators, researchers, lawyers and harm prevention experts (amongst others).British licensees in particular appear confused about the nature of the relationship that the Gambling Commission aspires to and the extent to which it wishes to understand the industry it regulates. Concerns had previously been expressed with regard to the apparent segregation and marginalisation of operator-led measures within the proposed national harm prevention strategy. Then there is the question of how much of the £2.9bn in gambling duties which Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs currently collects should be injected into the NHS for treatment purposes. HM Treasury will probably be mindful of the fact that sticking operators with a 10% levy is likely to cause the collapse of large parts of the licensed gambling industry – from bingo club operators struggling to get by to high-end Mayfair casinos already paying 50% of their revenue to Exchequer (and unlikely to burden the NHS given the international nature of their customers). It is also likely that a 10% levy on top of the 21% rate of remote gaming duty (which takes effect from April) will result in significant leakage to unlicensed operators. The Church of England may quite legitimately ignore such considerations – but others must consider the best interests of the consumer and of the economy.We might also wonder how a one-hundred-fold increase in funds would be spent, given how little is known about the effectiveness of different modes of treatment (and the complications of comorbidity and heterogeneity). The NHS could clearly use the cash but without a clear idea of what specific treatment services are required, the chances are that it would simply compensate for central funding cuts and so do little to address gambling harms.   Last year, the Gambling Commission’s expert advisory body, the Responsible Gambling Strategy Board appeared to indicate that funding may need to rise – over time – to as much as £76m (with around £60m for treatment services). Separately, the Labour Party has advocated a levy of 1% of gross gambling yield (or about £120m a year, depending upon how National Lottery contributions are considered). UK: Regulation – O (Big) Brother Where Art Thou?Compared with last year, this week’s ICE expo was a mercifully quiet and relatively uneventful affair. Twelve months ago, everyone was talking about the Gambling Commission’s off-piste sermonising on the subject of girls in bikinis. This year the, main topic of discussion was the regulator’s decision to join the Pole Dancers Union in boycotting the event entirely. Share The noble prelate is right to raise the issue of funding – particularly given current confusion on the matter – but he and others in Parliament need to be more careful in how they present their facts, particularly if they are serious about conducting their own review of gambling legislation. Related Articles At last month’s CMS Gambling Conference, the chief executive of the Gambling Commission, Neil McArthur, expressed discomfort in relation to his own experiences of online sportsbetting – and repeated attempts to push him towards online casino; so this would appear to be specifically on the regulator’s mind. In recent years, Britain’s licensed operators have tended to be so fixated on the issues right in front of them that they have struggled to focus even one move ahead. While energies are currently occupied by machine regulations and advertising freedoms, gambling businesses may do well to pre-emptively consider (rather than accidentally accelerate) a number of other challenges – including much vaunted ‘omnichannel’ cross-sell – that are starting to appear on the horizon. UK: In Parliament – Bishop’s Move to 10% LevyThe question of how much Britain’s gambling operators should pay for the treatment of gambling-related harms has been a constant theme of policy discourse ever since the Government ducked the levy option in last year’s legislative review.center_img There is an extent to which Justinian legal systems work like this: nail everything down in a codified way so that businesses, bureaucrats and grateful burghers now exactly what they can and can’t do. However, the Dutch tergiversations also point to a bigger issue: if everything needs to be agreed and codified in primary legislation it will take forever, it will largely reflect opinion over evidence and if it ever gets in place it is likely to be both rigid and obsolete. Equally, the original bill was relatively liberal in scope and this is being systematically undermined in favour of a much more restrictive set of policies which will (deliberately or otherwise) favour domestic incumbents and potentially severely impede .com rivals. The report – which contained ‘whistle blower’ evidence and does not appear to have been refuted – reflects the complexity of being socially responsible against a backdrop of being commercially dynamic in a period major structural change in the industry, with a backdrop of rapidly shifting expectations of what is ‘acceptable’. Only last month, GVC launched its ‘Change for the Bettor’ safer gambling campaign (following the launch of similar high profile campaigns by peers), with much well deserved praise from key stakeholders, including the minister. The speed with which the Guardian subsequently found its story may sadly reinforce the view that beneath a veneer of public relations, true cultural change has yet to take root (a view expressed a number of times during this week’s ICE Vox events). Sheikh Mohammed and the entire Maktoum family have been very significant supporters of British racing since the 1980’s, with an increasing investment of approximately £2m in sponsorships, support of a sizable workforce and opportunities for British and International runners in the UAE season – with huge prizemoney and incentives, as well as accounting for nearly 1% of all GB runners. This loss of support, while perhaps ‘small’ in the scheme of the things, is a potentially worrying sign for the future of the industry. The sport is a fragile ecosystem that essentially relies upon very wealthy people being happy to spend significant sums of money for very uncertain returns; while the make-up of this group is bound to change, an effective ‘replacement cycle’ is critical. Which group of individuals would be willing to step into the space left by Godolphin, and what racing is doing to ensure that this replacement cycle is intact and encouraged, is perhaps not as clear and as planned as it needs to be. This result is a stark warning to all participants that no one is above the law in terms of investigation and prosecution, and also that racing will take great steps to protect its reputation from both an integrity and welfare point of view. While this, like the case of Al Zarooni’s eight-year ban for the use of steroids, is a good deterrent to potential cheats, it does not provide retribution to those to have potentially lost out through this conduct – particularly as it is unclear how long it could have been going on. Owners of horses which could or should have won fairly have lost out on prize money, prestige and possibly stud fees – this having potentially far reaching consequences for the breed. Winning Post: Third time’s the charm for England’s casinos August 17, 2020 We probably have the public health lobby to thank for increasingly hermetic attitudes towards engagement with the industry – and we must recognise that some operators have created fertile ground for mistrust. However, in the interests of the consumer and of business sustainability, we must hope that ‘Hot Shoes’ wins out over cold shoulders. The disruption of ‘easy’ signup of harder gamblers will inevitably hit the ‘long tail’ of supply much harder than established brands. In betting, this represents only c. 10% of supply, but in gaming a much more significant c. 40% (and with promiscuous harder gamblers forming a key part of the 60% of more consolidated revenue also). We believe our 2ppt estimated revenue hit will overwhelmingly fall in this 40% of gaming, implying a c. 10% negative impact on ‘long tail’ casino revenue (already struggling to grow). The flip side of this impact is greater market share for more established brands, but of a smaller pie: further organic consolidation. Our central thesis for Germany remains that a compromise treaty needs to open up the licensing system in order to get EU approval – that’s it in terms of material change. There may be a chance to regulate some forms of gaming, but we do not see this as odds-on and the range of likely product restrictions and taxes are likely to be such that it would no longer be a profitable vertical anyway. We recognise that we have been saying this for years and we have been consistently wrong. However, this/next year the chances of this actually occurring are significantly higher, in our view. Germany: gambling regulation – Gotterdammerung?Germany’s many largely aborted attempts to domestically regulate online gambling have made Wagner’s Ring Cycle look like a model of light hearted brevity by comparison. However, German Minister Presidents are now threatening to sort out the current mess in a finally final way. There is logic to the timing mattering – the current 2012 Treaty is about to expire and only a short-term extension is likely to be acceptable as a fudge to keep things moving. The issue is that while a number of more liberal states are minded to include gaming in at least some forms, more conservative states are not – and agreement needs to be unanimous. Finally, there is the question of how much attention policy-makers ought to pay to those who have such a loose grasp on the facts of gambling-related harm (contrary to the bishop’s claims, there are not “430,000 gambling addicts” in Great Britain – more on this next week). We have a vague recollection that there is something in the Christian faith about not bearing false witness – but perhaps Parliamentary Privilege offers sanctuary from spiritual as well as secular laws. Netherlands: gambling regulation – political micromanagingThe Dutch Senate has been asking some prima facie logical questions in the latest instalment of its tortured path to maybe getting domestic remote licensing. They wanted to know exactly how an illegal operator would be defined; how specifically will gambling advertising be restricted, and; what measures based upon administrative law can be used for blocking. These questions need written responses, further adding to time pressure and a very fragile consensus. The Netherlands has a regulator, and the most efficient and effective means of gambling regulation in our view is to empower the regulator and let them get on with it. However, this requires political trust that online gambling is broadly acceptable and can be effectively policed. Unfortunately for the remote sector (and at least partly because of it), for too many politicians in too many countries the evidence to the contrary seems to keep piling up. UK: Regulation – Guardian Strikes AgainThe latest in a long string of Guardian exposes on the gambling industry – this time on cross-selling practices in GVC’s betting shops – raised a number of larger questions of current and future relevance to regulation in Britain and elsewhere. The Guardian reported that staff in Ladbrokes and Coral LBOs were effectively being asked to bid for job security (once the £2 maximum stake on machines kicks in and the planned cull of shops begins) by maximising online cross-sell to customers. Winning Post: Swedish regulator pushes back on ‘Storebror’ approach to deposit limits August 24, 2020 Of course, there is nothing wrong in cross-selling goods and services – when we go to the cinema, we are unlikely to feel moral outrage at propositions of popcorn. However, gambling is different. We know from prevalence surveys that participation in a large number of gambling activities is a fairly good predictor of problem gambling. For example, the likelihood of being a problem gambler (on a probabilistic basis) if one participates in four to six activities is eight times higher than if one participates in two or three. As a consequence, multi-channel marketing strategies (which certain operators have been highly open about pursuing) do appear to present specific risks that ought to be considered more closely. The direct link being made between losing FOBT revenue and pointing customers online is also a gift to those campaigners wishing to see more stringent restrictions on what is still a highly liberally regulated channel (at least in product terms). The story also illustrates the fact that regulatory pressure can result in negative adverse consequences. Much of Britain’s gambling industry is facing tightening business conditions as the ability to generate revenue constricts and the costs of doing business (including duty but also investment in safer gambling and compliance programmes) increases. We ought not to be surprised if this dynamic results in corners being cut or unwise commercial decisions being taken. As we have observed before, continually beating up the licensed industry may seem like great sport – but it is unlikely to result in the best outcomes for consumers. UK: horseracing – equine flu may highlight a more serious problem… Racing in the GB has been suspended until at least the 13 February (with the loss of 23 meetings in that time) following an outbreak of equine flu. It is thought the virus is a mutated strain, due to vaccinated horses being affected as well as unvaccinated with confirmed cases in France and Ireland as well as the UK, it is unclear where the virus could have originated.Over 100 racing yards in GB have been ordered into lock down in order to prevent the virus spreading, and testing is occurring on all potentially affected horses – so far resulting in three confirmed cases. While the UK’s looming exit from the EU might be playing a part in the BHA’s sensibly cautious approach, (the importance of disease prevention and management is instrumental in the attainment of any third country gaining import/export rights to the EU; although HKJC has already confirmed that it has the procedures in place to keep accepting horses and test them at source), the main issue is clearly welfare. Winning Post: UK gambling feels the ‘Noyes’ with SMF report August 10, 2020 International: horseracing – sheikhen, but sufficiently stirred?Sheikh Mohammed’s horseracing operations, Godolphin and Darley, have announced significant cuts following a global spending review. Two further senior executives have left the business (following the departure of its Chief Executive John Fergusson last year), with long standing sponsorships of the Irish Oaks (30 years) and Yorkshire Oaks (29 years) also casualties. While there are rumours that further race sponsorships may be cut in France and Germany, this has yet to be confirmed. Spain: online gambling – Q4 figures rather eggyAs the curate politely if obtusely observed, it is hard for an egg to be good in places. So it is hard to hold on too convincingly to the positives in Spain’s official Q4 market figures. 10.7% growth YoY to €189.5m was in line with expectations and against especially tough betting comps (€99.9m, -2.7% YoY) while gaming continued to exhibit growth across all product verticals (+31% YoY overall). However, despite continued aggressive marketing support (50% revenue, net of bonuses; + 45% YoY), likely in part driven by the tax decrease and early ‘responses’ to the licensing window opening, the number of actives actually fell YoY by 8%. This suggests a market which might be capable of growth but that is far from sustainable from a net contribution perspective for the vast majority of its licensees. From a top-down perspective, positioning in Spain still appears attractive in terms of macro trends and liberal regulation. However, from a bottom-up perspective, too many operators seem to have decided that is the case in an undifferentiated way, causing overheating and potentially signs that the market could start to disappoint.last_img read more

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first_img David Lampitt, Sportradar: F1 presents betting’s most sizeable opportunity August 14, 2020 Share Submit StumbleUpon Sportradar combats social media abuse with player protection solution August 17, 2020 Share Related Articles Björn Nilsson: How Triggy is delivering digestible data through pre-set triggers August 28, 2020 Leading sports data, insights and content supplier Sportradar has teamed up with Germany-based SPORT1 to showcase the newly launched eFootball.Pro League.SPORT1 has acquired platform-neutral rights to broadcast the fixtures, with live and highlight coverage of the current season in Austria, Germany and Switzerland.  The sports platform will live stream the fixtures on SPORT1.de, in addition to on its YouTube channel and again on eSPORTS1.Lutz Tigges, Senior Director Audiovisual Broadcast at Sportradar, commented: “We are very pleased to work with SPORT1 in esports and support the successful growth and development of its fully dedicated esports channel. “eFootball.Pro League is a fantastic fit for that strategy as it’s a new concept that delivers high quality, exciting matches.“The competition involves a number of teams from across Europe, including Schalke 04. Joining them are FC Barcelona, Celtic FC, AS Monaco, FC Nantes and Boavista FC.Daniel von Busse, COO TV and Member of the Board of SPORT1 GmbH, added: “Through this partnership with the eFootball.Pro League and the TAG Heuer Virtual Bundesliga, we now offer esports fans the full spectrum of virtual soccer on eSPORTS1. “With its format of regular season, playoffs and finals, the competition, which was the brainchild of Barcelona star Gerard Piqué, promises excitement from beginning to end. It will definitely also wow esports fans in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.”last_img read more

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first_img Submit Virtual Grand National success sees bookmakers donate over £2.6m to NHS Charities April 6, 2020 Russell Colvin joins FSB as retail lead June 9, 2020 Share Share StumbleUpon Related Articles George Fotopoulos, Vermantia: The future for retail betting April 30, 2020 Following a record-breaking Grand National weekend for self-service betting terminals (SSBTs) from Playtech BGT Sports (PBS), which saw bets placed more than double over last year, the company’s Senior Commercial Director Lee Drabwell explains the reasoning behind their surging customer popularity…SBC: SSBTs are proving to be increasingly popular with horseracing customers, why do you think this is the case?  LD: We are finding that an increasing number of customers, both old and new, are enjoying horseracing on our SSBTs. Having good quality data at their fingertips and a quick transaction means they don’t have to worry about queues or missing the start of the race, which is always an advantage. We’re also finding that our SSBTs are drawing in a far broader customer base to betting shops than ever before, especially for those frustrated by the online experience and looking for a new way to bet but unlikely to want to do so over the counter. Our SSBTs bridge this gap, not only by providing shop customers with the digitised betting process they are accustomed to, but also via a dual screen user interface that is exclusively integrated with the Racing Post and all its unique data and betting insights – offering a betting experience that is unmatched anywhere else, both online and offline. SBC: How do you attract a younger adult audience to bet in-shop and tempt them off their mobile devices?LD: SSBTs allow the younger, digitally savvy customer to study the form, choose their selection and place a bet all whilst stood in front of an interactive 22-inch screen, rather than their 4-inch smart phone. Our terminals provide the digital experience associated with online, in a retail shop with the ability to place a full range of bets whilst using cash or card. For most online customers, betting on their personal devices is a solitary activity, whether for racing or other sports, and the chance to have that same experience in-shop, while enjoying the shared experience of a live racing event is hard to beat. SBC: How does the Grand National compare with Cheltenham, where the excitement is more spread over the entire week? LD: I think Cheltenham served as a great primer for the Grand National. Both are more than a century old and are easily among the most popular fixtures in the annual racing calendar. In general, we are seeing far more betting on horse racing than ever before, and while our retail partners have their own methods of marketing the big race, our SSBTs are certainly generating a lot of the interest off their own accord. Every horseracing event on the calendar is seeing even greater numbers of bets placed on SSBTs, and this continued success is in turn bringing more customers into retail shops specifically to use our SBBTs and all the sports betting products available on them. SBC: Is that something you prepare for in terms of terminal capacity, betting markets, promotions etc?LD: Not at all. Our SSBTs are specifically designed to handle a high volume of transactions at the most demanding of times, as well as being fast, convenient and easy to use.When it comes to managing the rush of punters drawn in by the excitement of the Grand National, our Racing Post features more than provides for this – it enables easy navigation for customers both old and new – allowing bets to be placed quickly and with ease.  SBC: Is there anything you’ve learned from previous high betting volume periods that you’re looking to apply for future events? LD: We’re always looking for ways to innovate around our SSBTs in order to ensure we can offer our retail partners higher customer engagement and revenues. One of the best advantages SSBTs have is that they’re faster and more convenient than over the counter. We want to make sure it stays that way even during high betting volume periods. Whether that be with cash or via our new contactless payment functionality being trialled by Paddy Power, our aim is to ensure that the time spent processing a transaction is short as possible, which is especially valuable when the start of the race may only be seconds away.last_img read more

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first_img Submit Related Articles Sports betting and igaming solutions provider Delasport has strengthened its online casino offering by securing a new agreement with Betsoft. The new agreement will strengthen Delasport’s network of casino content providers, which already includes Evolution Gaming, Microgaming, Vivo Gaming, Evoplay, Quickspin, Asia Gaming, Pragmatic Play, Reel Time Gaming and many more.Operators running off the Delasport software will be able to offer Betsoft’s portfolio of more than 190 random number generation (RNG) titles, designed to ‘attract, engage and retain players’. Commenting on the partnership, Delasport’s Head of Casino Sami Kern explained: “As a team, we stand for progress, dedication, determination, and reliability. Our further expansion into the casino market is predicated on the quality of our offering and so it is essential to forge relationships with renowned content providers such as Betsoft.”Betsoft’s Sales Executive Anna Mackney added: ‘We are delighted to have reinforced our relationship with such a significant operator as Delasport. The breadth of our portfolio ensures that we guarantee genuine entertainment which both attracts and retains clients for the long-term. We look forward to continuing to strengthen our relationship.”The news comes just over a week after Delasport expanded its operational capacity in Africa and Latin America after signing a partnership with BetOBet. Share Delasport agrees new partnership with BetOBet May 26, 2020 StumbleUpon Soft2Bet: Why diversification of white label products is essential in complex times May 28, 2020 Share Gamesys tops list for GambleAware Q1 donations July 10, 2020last_img read more

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