February 20, 2020
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first_img Jan 19th 2017, 12:49 PM Short URL A GROUP OF NASA-funded researchers are to enter an isolated dome on a remote Hawaii volcano to study human behaviour in long-term space exploration, including a planned voyage to Mars.The six scientists enter their new home on Thursday on the Big Island’s Mauna Loa volcano for an eight-month stay.The team will have no physical contact with people in the outside world and will work with a 20-minute delay in communications, the time it would take for an email to reach Earth from Mars.The study will assess the psychological difficulties associated with living in isolated and confined conditions for an extended time.The project is designed to help the US space agency send humans on long space voyages including to Mars by the 2030s.“We’re hoping to figure out how best to select individual astronauts, how to compose a crew and how to support that crew on long-duration space missions,” principal investigator Kim Binstead, a University of Hawaii science professor. Inside the dome. Source: APShe said NASA’s timeline is realistic unless the agency is “directed to do something different by the new administration.”Trump’s transition team did not respond to an emailed request for comment on NASA’s plan.Leading the crew is mission commander James Bevington, a freelance space scientist who has acted as a visiting researcher for the International Space University. The other team members include engineers, a computer scientist, a doctoral candidate and a biomedical expert.High demandThey were selected from a group of 700 applicants that went through cognitive and personality tests as well as extensive interviews.“When I started, my biggest fear was that we were going to be that crew that turned out like Biosphere 2, which wasn’t a very pretty picture,” Bevington said.Biosphere 2 was a 1990s experimental greenhouse-like habitat in Arizona. It housed different natural ecosystems and a small crew in an effort to understand what would be needed for humans to live on other planets.The experiment quickly spiraled out of control as the habitat failed to maintain safe levels of carbon dioxide and the crew grew discontent.The latest HI-SEAS mission is the third round of research funded by NASA, which has dedicated over $2 million to the Hawaii project. Previous missions focused on food requirements and crew cohesion.“Mars is one of the best places in the solar system to look for signs of past or current life,” said Binstead, adding that would be the most significant scientific discovery “of all time”.Catastrophes Furthermore, man-made disasters or natural catastrophes such as an asteroid hit could force a human exodus from Earth, she said. “Right now, all of our eggs for life are in one basket. I think it’s a good overall strategy for us as a species to spread out further.” The dome will house six researchers. Source: APThe researchers will wear devices around their necks that measure their moods and proximity to other team members. They’ll also use virtual reality devices to simulate familiar and comforting surroundings they wouldn’t have access to while living on Mars.They will wear space suits whenever they leave the compound to conduct daily tasks including geological and mapping studies. The crew eats mostly freeze-dried foods that have a long shelf life. Some canned food and lightweight snacks are also brought in, including one of Hawaii’s favorites.“Spam gets quite popular,” Binstead said.Occasional resupply deliveries are recovered with a robot in order to maintain the crew’s isolation. The 1200-square-foot simulated space home has small sleeping quarters for each member as well as a kitchen, laboratory and bathroom.The University of Hawaii operates the facility called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS.There are a number of other Mars simulation projects around the world, but the Hawaii project has been receiving federal funding for several years and is unique, the university says, because of its accessibility, weather and Mars-like geography, tucked away on a rocky, red plain below the summit of the world’s largest active volcano.Read: ‘I was flat on my back, in a neck brace, head brace and spinal board. It was scary.’ >Read: Gardaí arrest man with sawn off shotgun after chasing him through gardens in Dublin > Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 7,947 Views Share7 Tweet Email1 16 Comments NASA scientists to spend eight months in Hawaiian dome for ‘Mars simulation’ The study will assess the psychological difficulties associated with living in isolation. Thursday 19 Jan 2017, 12:49 PM https://jrnl.ie/3194338 Image: AP/Press Association Images Image: AP/Press Association Images By Associated Presslast_img read more

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first_img Image: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie Tuesday 7 Feb 2017, 12:49 PM Share695 Tweet Email2 Feb 7th 2017, 12:49 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article http://jrnl.ie/3227121 Image: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie Short URL Tesco workers at nine stores to strike ‘indefinitely’ from Valentine’s Day Up to 15 stores could be affected by the strike action next week, with more ballots due tonight. By Sean Murray 38,224 Views 79 Comments Updated 1.20pmTESCO WORKERS AT nine branches across the country are set to go on strike from next Tuesday 14 February, and the Mandate Trade Union has warned that the strike would continue for “an indefinite duration”.The company asked all staff who had been working there since before 1996 to sign up to contracts for greatly-reduced pay. Last April, union members voted overwhelmingly to strike over a two-tier contract system the company was reportedly hoping to instate.Possible industrial action was delayed through the intervention of the Workplace Relations Commission (WRC), but allegations have surfaced that Tesco are planning to initiate the same Labour Court recommendations that staff rejected last year.Mandate, which says it represents more than 10,000 workers at the company, is calling on Tesco to guarantee that no changes to existing contracts will be made without agreement.A spokesperson for Tesco Ireland told TheJournal.ie that the company had “exhausted the State industrial relations process” and said that ball was now in Mandate’s court to abide by the Labour Court’s recommendation.The nine Tesco stores set to be affected are:Baggot Street Lower, Dublin 2Ballyfermot Road, Dublin 10Vevay Road, Bray, Co WicklowClearwater Shopping Centre, Finglas, Dublin 11Rear Main Street, Deanscurragh,  Co LongfordNavan Town Centre, Co MeathO’Connell Street, Abbeyquarter North, Co SligoManor West Retail Park, Tralee, Co KerryTullamore Retail Park, Cloncollig, Co OffalyThe union accuses the company of never justifying the cuts to their workers’ conditions of employment and that their actions against around 250 workers who have given more than 20 years of service was an “abuse of power”.John Douglas, Mandate general secretary, said: “Tesco workers in Ireland who have worked with the company for more than 21 years, and are already classified as low-paid on slightly more than €14 per hour, are being told to accept imposed changes to their contracts or get out the door.No worker wants to go on strike, but our members recognise that if Tesco can get away with tearing up contracts of employment without agreement for pre-1996 staff, it’ll be the 3,000 workers on post-1996 contracts who are currently on a higher hourly rate of pay next.More ballots on industrial action will take place tonight, which could mean that the number of stores affected by the strike could rise to 15.In the Dáil last week, Independents4Change TD for Dublin South Central Joan Collins raised the potential of strike action during Leaders’ Questions in Dáil Éireann and claimed that Tesco plans to bypass Mandate and ‘unilaterally impose pay cuts of 15% on the company’s longest-serving workers’.Collins further claimed that those workers are facing a 15% pay cut, and that the move is part of a larger plan, known as ‘Project Black’, which “aims to get rid of 1,200 of the most secure and well-paid jobs in the company”. She described such actions as “both worrying and unnecessary”.A Tesco statement said: “The Labour Court has issued a very clear Recommendation which sets out the path for resolution.Tesco has accepted the Labour Court Recommendation in its totality even though it was beyond what we believed was affordable. Mandate has rejected it.“Our business must be able to meet the needs of our customers but terms and conditions nearly quarter of a century old do not take account of the growth of late night, weekend and online shopping and create unfairness as hours are not evenly spread out.”Read: Tesco ‘disappointed’ at ‘inaccurate’ claims by TD that 1,200 jobs are on the linelast_img read more

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first_img With Cllrs McCreesh, @myseamusbrowne & Cllr John Costelloe at #Limerick protest against Incinerator with @LAP_Limerick @limerickpost pic.twitter.com/ACxkEYAG8m— Maurice Quinlivan TD (@QuinlivanTD) March 11, 2017 Saturday 11 Mar 2017, 5:44 PM Over 1,000 people protest against Limerick incinerator plans Irish Cement has said the practice is safe and there will be no added emissions at the factory. 11,604 Views Mar 11th 2017, 5:44 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article By Garreth MacNamee Image: Twitter/TaraRoonies Short URLcenter_img Image: Twitter/TaraRoonies OVER 1,000 PEOPLE turned out in Limerick city today to protest against a cement company’s plans to incinerate tyres at 1,500 degrees.The Irish Cement factory in Mungret had been burning fossil fuels but they are expected to start burning tyres and other industrial waste in the near future. Residents in the local area fear that harmful emissions from the burning tyres can cause a host of health problems. Limerick city council granted the company permission to burn the materials at a meeting on Thursday.Irish Cement has said the practice is safe and there will be no added emissions at the factory.Limerick Against Pollution (LAP) released a statement and said they are protesting the developments because they are worried for the health of the region. Source: Maurice Quinlivan TD/Twitter A spokeswoman said: “ The community-led action is being organised to raise awareness among the citizenry of the mid-western region of the potential dangers and health risks associated with this planning decision. The hasty nature of the verdict was clearly intended to unsettle any fair and transparent public consultation process.“While it is both deeply worrying and deeply undemocratic, the executive decision would indicate that LAP’s strategy is working.”Read: Puffy faces and a constant need to pee: Moon tourists may be in for a rough ride >Read: Spanish police arrest suspect in massive ‘eat and run’ case > Share Tweet Email https://jrnl.ie/3283033 47 Comments last_img read more

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first_img 53 Comments Sunday 9 Apr 2017, 10:00 PM 36,799 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL That was obviously an awful situation, but I learned as I worked longer in the homeless service that it was not an isolated case of family members finding a vulnerable adult wherever they had found refuge and continuing the abuse. https://jrnl.ie/3329884 Share319 Tweet Email4 Apr 9th 2017, 10:00 PM center_img She said to me, “Your Dad was singing all night.” I could not believe that the health service decided to over medicate my father to shut him up because he was singing at night to get him through the pain, the fact that he was not in his own home or his own bed, or the fact that he might have been hallucinating at that moment. What I taught him to do every time he went into hallucination was to sing and they sedated him for that. By Christina Finn Source: Shutterstock/wavebreakmediaOver-medication concerns Ruane said that her father is not the only person to be treated in such a way, stating that being medicated unnecessarily is a complete attack on a person’s agency, autonomy and human rights.Over the years, Ireland has witnessed a litany of failures in the protection of vulnerable people – Aras Attracta, Magdalene Laundries, mother and baby homes, and the abuse case of Grace, to name but a few.However, Ruane pointed out that abuses take place on a regular basis.I remember one woman who was living in a homeless service who had managed to get away from her family. Her sons and her husband had been constantly sexually abusing and raping her. When she found refuge in a city centre hostel that family continued, every week, to find her at her post office, to further beat her up and to take her weekly money so that she would be left begging on the streets. It is simply abuse. It is an appalling and shocking thing to happen anyone and nobody should have to suffer abuse but, more importantly, people need to be empowered to respond and seek out help and support when they are the subject of abuse. That is important.Read: This is what Fianna Fáil’s motion about the Garda Commissioner will say>Read: ‘More cock-up than conspiracy’: Shatter defends gardaí, but hits out at Kenny> Your Dad was singing all night.” I could not believe that the health service decided to over-medicate my father to shut him up because he was singing at night to get him through the pain.SENATOR LYNN RUANE recounted a personal story about her father this week as the Seanad discussed a Bill aimed at protecting the most vulnerable adults in Irish society.Ruane said she had not planned to speak during the debate on Wednesday, but after listening to some of the stories, she felt she had to.“As I was listening to everyone’s contributions I could not help going through so many of the faces and the cases of adult abuse I have witnessed over the years. Although we have uncovered some of the most extreme cases, there are many cases that are so subtle and so carefully manipulated that we will never be able to pinpoint that they are happening,” she said.The far-reaching Bill, which is not being opposed by government, aims to make better provision for the care and protection of adults who are at risk and to establish the National Adult Safeguarding Authority.Mandatory reporting The proposed and complicated legislation (which senators hope will come to fruition in about 12 months) aims to make reporting by certain professionals and others where an adult has suffered abuse or harm or is suffering abuse, mandatory. Source: Sam BoalWhen the discussion turned to the care of the elderly, she recounted her own personal experience with her father, who died four years ago this week.‘My father found refuge in song’“There was one thing that stood out to me throughout my father’s illness. He had dementia. I remember going to the hospital… I remember going up one day and my father sang. He found refuge in song. Every time he felt uncomfortable, or scared of a situation because of hallucinations caused by his Lewy body disease, he would sing.“The one thing he could remember, and which took him back to that moment of safety, was the words of a song he could remember. We sang every day until the day he died and I taught him songs, even right up to Paolo Nutini. He was still learning until the day he died,” she told her Seanad colleagues.“I remember going up to the hospital one day. I experienced a lot of things that no older person should have to endure. I witnessed him being left in his own urine, being left without his catheter and having to fight for things… One of the things that hurt me most when I went up there was around medication,” she said.I went up one day and my Dad was completely out of it. I asked the nurse, “Why is my Dad so out of it? Why is he sedated?” My Dad never went into distress, was never violent, was never a problem. He became immobile so that he was never a flight risk. He was not trying to run out of the hospital. When the nurse looked at me and gave her answer as if it was normal, I could not believe the culture that had been created in the health service around medication. Source: Shutterstock/O’SHIShe also recalled the story of another woman, who lived in Dublin, whose son would come every week, take her money, and leave. The woman was left begging outside the shops within her own community, because she did not have access to her own social welfare.How do we protect people?“The issue of financial abuse of older people is huge. How do we unearth that it is happening within families? How do we even get there? It is quite scary to think that we might never be able to fully protect vulnerable people,” said Ruane.Senator Keith Swanick said the Bill’s goal is to ensure that cases like those never happen again.While abuse is very complex issue, it is is important that there are structures in place to protect people, said Senator Victor Boyhan.It’s emotional, physical, financial, mental and sexual. There is a range of abuses, they are all abuses and there is no greater or lesser category of abuse. ‘I couldn’t believe they over-medicated my father to shut him up because he was singing’ During a debate on proposed new laws to protect the vulnerable, Senator Lynn Ruane opened up about her own experience. last_img read more

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first_img Image: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ie https://jrnl.ie/4798820 Source: PA Images I support the Prime Minister in getting a deal and not leaving without a deal. But I have not seen enough work into actually trying to get a deal. When earlier in the week I asked No 10 for a summary of what the planning was actually getting a deal, I was sent a one-page summary. There is not enough work into actually getting a deal, which is not what the prime minister signed up to try to do.UK cabinet minister Amber Rudd became the latest in a string of resignations from the Conservative party. Source: ShutterstockThe concerns I have seen on this are coming from adults with physical and/or sensory disabilities who are capable of making their own decisions. These people have told me of feeling that there has been an unreasonable effort to control them, and when they have not complied, some people have apparently been threatened that use of equipment or support hours will either be reduced or withdrawn.Leigh Gath, the Confidential Recipient for Vulnerable Persons, criticised the HSE in the watchdog’s fourth annual report. Source: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ieWhat we’re going to do is to continue acting on the basis of the legislation as it was passed in 2005. Our basis gives a very clear and legal underpinning of what it is that we’re doing.Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection Regina Doherty said the government will continue processing Public Services Card information, in defiance of a ruling by the Data Protection Commissioner. No Comments Share Tweet Email Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Image: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ie Sep 8th 2019, 6:30 PM By Nicky Ryan Sunday 8 Sep 2019, 6:30 PM Short URL Source: ShutterstockI personally have two physician friends who have committed suicide in their 30s. That has a huge impact, [medical workers] have a higher rate of suicide, we have a higher rate of depression, we have a higher rate of marital breakdown.Dr Gabrielle Colleran, a paediatric radiologist at Temple Street and Holles Street hospitals in Dublin, said the stress hospital consultants face can take a “huge personal toll” on doctors. Source: Leah Farrell/RollingNews.ieOne [resident] told me she approached [protesters] to ask them to be quiet and she was met with abuse. She also said that the protest has gone on until after 10pm which is after the cut off point. The residents can’t even open their windows in this heat due to the noise, and it’s keeping kids awake. I have also been contacted by taxi drivers as there is disruption to the rank there.Green Party councillor Claire Byrne on complaints received over protests headed by Gemma O’Doherty outside Google’s offices in Dublin. Source: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ieThe Iveagh Markets is one of the most significant buildings ever constructed in Dublin and a central part of the Guinness Legacy that has enriched the lives of Dubliners and visitors alike. It is of the highest level of urgency that the future of this important building is secured.A report by Howley Hayes into the Iveagh Markets in Dublin’s Liberties, which has fallen into a state of severe disrepair. Source: Patrick Bolger/INPHOWhen you’re living in an area, you don’t realise how tough it is. I was growing up in the ’70s and ’80s. They were tough times generally for the country with lack of work. In areas like Ballymun, it was a lot more difficult. There were situations where if you were from Ballymun, you could be turned away from an interview, let alone a job.Bohs legend Tony O’Connor (left) looked back on his League of Ireland career. 11,119 Views ‘It is of the highest level of urgency that the future of this important building is secured’: The week in quotes Here’s what was said and who said what this week.last_img read more

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first_img https://jrnl.ie/4801070 No Comments Updated Sep 9th 2019, 8:45 AM EVERY MORNING TheJournal.ie brings you all the news you need to know as you start the day.1. #BORIS: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to arrive in Dublin this morning for a “high stakes” meeting with Taoiseach Leo Varadkar. 2. #COMPO CULTURE: Insurers’ spending on liability and motor claims has barely changed in a decade despite suggestions that Ireland’s rampant ‘compensation culture’ has been behind the country’s recent insurance crisis.3. #WATERFORD: A man in his 40s has died after falling in a popular walking and climbing area in the Comeragh Mountains in Co Waterford.4. #VACCINES: Health Minister Simon Harris has sent letters to social media companies and sporting organisations asking them to help raise awareness for vaccinations.5. #STRIKE: School secretaries who members of trade union Fórsa are to take industrial action later this month in a dispute over pay and working conditions.6. #SEIZED: A horse’s tail, a dried bat, a moose horn and 37 crocodile teeth were among the strange items that people tried to smuggle into the state by post during the past two years.7. #RIP: Irish athlete Craig Lynch has died in a car accident, his club has announced. 8. #TALLGHT: The second man arrested in relation to the murder of Vincent Parsons in Tallaght, Dublin has been released without charge. 9. #FLIGHTS: British Airways has said it has been forced to cancel almost all its flights from UK airports on the first day of a strike by pilots.On the go? You can now listen to the 9 at 9 as an audio bulletin from TheJournal.ie, supported by Volkswagen. Get started by hitting the button below. Image: Shutterstock/StudioByTheSea Image: Shutterstock/StudioByTheSea Sep 9th 2019, 7:45 AM The 9 at 9: Monday Here’s what you need to know as you start your day. Share1 Tweet Email center_img By Hayley Halpin Short URL 10,490 Views Get the 9 at 9 News audio Monday 9 Sep 2019, 8:45 AM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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first_imgThe approval by the Greek Parliament on Wednesday of the medium-term fiscal strategy programme was an important first step toward resolving its long-term economic woes, the acting head of the International Monetary Fund told a press conference in Washington. John Lipsky, the IMF’s acting managing director, said that the package of reforms voted upon “was not austerity so much as it was an important, ambitious structural reform. The debt and deficit are really symptoms of the competitiveness problem.” Lipsky said that Greece needs to “eliminate the crippling inefficiencies” in its economy, even as it moves to put its finances back in order and reduce its debt.Source: Athens News Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Just a week after police smashed four major extortion and usury rackets in Thessaloniki, the Financial Crimes Squad (SDOE) has indicated that it is on the verge of cracking similar rings in Attica and the central port of Volos. According to a source at SDOE, the new rings are smaller than the ones that have been operating in the northern port city, but they are believed to be growing rapidly. The same source advised that an increasing number of entrepreneurs are turning to such rackets for financial aid as banks are unable to give them loans amid tightening liquidity. The practice of extortion rings buying winning lottery tickets en masse as a way of laundering their profits is also gaining ground, the source said. Meanwhile, Finance Ministry inspectors have been instructed to start pursuing some 14.8 billion euros in unpaid taxes owed to the state by 4,151 individuals. The order came a few hours after the ministry published a list of the individuals, who include several household names, in a bid to shame them into paying up. The list includes veteran singer Tolis Voskopoulos, who owes just over half a million euros, and disgraced business tycoon Giorgos Koskotas, who owes 2.4 million euros (his brother, Stavros, owes about the same). Giorgos Batatoudis, the former president of Thessaloniki soccer club PAOK, is also on the list with tax debts of 2.5 million euros, as is Pavlos Psomiadis, the owner of defunct insurance firm Aspis, with debts of 1.5 million euros. Topping the list though is Nikos Kassimatis, a Thessaloniki accountant with a tax debt of 952 million euros who is currently serving a 504-year prison sentence for running a value-added tax scam. Last September, the ministry published a similar list of 6,000 companies with a collective tax debt of 30 billion euros. That list was topped by the Hellenic Railways Organization (OSE), which owes 1.26 billion euros in unpaid taxes, and included 13 professional soccer clubs. It remains unclear how much of the 30 billion euros has been recouped. Source: Kathimerinilast_img read more

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first_imgSouth Australian Labor MP Tom Koutsantonis has laughed off media speculation that has made reference to him being the future leader of the Labor party in South Australia. “We have a leader, his name is Jay Weatherill and I support him completely and unconditionally,” Mr Koutsantonis tells Neos Kosmos. An article published this week in The Australian, made reference to Mr Koutsantonis to be the likely Labor leader, along with Jack Snelling, should Labor lose the upcoming election. However, Mr Koutsantonis denied any claims that he is vying for the top job, but added that it’s “flattering” that journalists would suggest he would be the future leader but was adamant that “it’s not the case”. When asked if he had any aspirations of being the Labor leader in South Australia he says the only aspirations he has is “to serve community” and none of becoming the leader of the party. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Two Greek Australian surgeons have been named as perpetrators in a growing toxic hospital culture in Australia.In a Four Corners investigation, Dr Chris Xenos and Dr Helen Maroulis were singled out for inciting fear and stress in their co-workers, with Xenos also being accused of sexual harassment.The two were part of a large investigation into the state of the medical teaching culture in Australia, where it was revealed that one in five medical students have had thoughts of suicide in the previous year.One in twenty doctors also admitted to suffering stress from bullying in the workplace.According to neurosurgeon Dr Caroline Tan, her former supervisor Dr Chris Xenos exposed himself and asked her to perform a sexual act.After bringing the harassment to the management of Monash Medical Centre, Dr Tan was subjected to severe character assassinations and was not taken seriously by management. The matter was taken to the Victorian Criminal and Administrative Tribunal, where judge Marilyn Harbison found Dr Xenos had attempted to smear Dr Tan’s character by “exploring every possible aspect of her professional competence [and] taking advantage of his position of power over her”.Monash Medical Centre is now investigating another surgeon, Dr Helen Maroulis for bullying and intimidating staff. Former staff member, Imogen Ibbett says some days after working alongside Dr Maroulis, she would go home distraught.“I remember days when I would go home and just cry, just sit in a dark room and just cry,” Dr Ibbett told Four Corners.“We’re so vulnerable anyway when we’re at that junior stage in our career, and really all the way through our training we’re very, very vulnerable.”Source: ABClast_img read more

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