April 12, 2021
  • 7:42 am The Groove Orient Share Spring Tour Dates Including Fools Paradise Throwdown
  • 7:41 am GRiZ Announced As Headliner On Northern Nights Music Festival Lineup
  • 7:36 am Dead & Company Debuts ‘Box Of Rain’ At Rockin’ Cincinnati Show [Full Audio/Video]
  • 7:36 am Club Venues In Many Major Cities Added To Ticketmaster’s Voucher Redemption Program
  • 7:33 am Lettuce LOCKN’ Set And ‘Let Us Play’ Documentary To Be Broadcast Tonight On Qello

first_imgWhen the world you’ve known burns down around you, what do you do? Guitarist and songwriter Dave Simonett of bluegrass outfit Trampled By Turtles faced this reality as he stood among the ashes of his 10-year marriage that had just ended, a relationship that started when he was just 19. Looking for some kind of catharsis, Simonett retreated to an isolated cabin in northern Minnesota for a week. He took pens, paper and a commitment to capture his turmoil in song. The end result was the grouping of songs that end up on Furnance, Simonett’s latest release under this solo moniker Dead Man Winter.Like spring buds popping up through the smoldered destruction from a forest fire, Furnace represents new beginnings for Simonett in a number of ways. It is the first time he chose to detail an intimate part of his life in such vivid, literal terms. It is the first time he approached songwriting with a different process. Probably most consequently, it is the first time he’s put his bread and butter band Trampled By Turtles on hiatus in 14 years to devote his time to a solo project. And for many fans of Trampled By Turtles, it will be the first time they’ve heard Simonett plug in and jam with a full, electric band, something he did with great frequency before Trampled took off.Furnance is as varied sonically as the various emotions that swirled around Simonett in his winter cabin. “This House Is On Fire” is a lonely, country ballad about the beginning of the end of his relationship, while “Destroyer” is a sprightly, folk rock number with flashes of the Traveling Wilburys shining through the melody. “I Remember This Place Being Bigger” is a quiet, soft meditation that lifts like fog over a lake, one of the prettiest sounding songs Simonett has ever recorded. The end of the album closes in the electric embers of “You Are Out Of Control,” with guitars, organ and drums raging together in dissonance until they finally flicker to an end, like a fire whose exhausted it’s fuel and burned itself out.The album is a pivotal statement from Simonett as both a person and an artist and Live For Live Music was fortunate enough to talk with Simonett over the phone about the album. Down to earth and genuine, our conversation went from recording Furnance with his new band to Trampled By Turtles’ friendship with Infamous Stringdusters and Greensky Bluegrass to how he wants to grow up and be a ski bum. Read the full interview below.L4LM: You are releasing Furnace as Dead Man Winter. The album itself captures a significant part of your life in your divorce. But just as an artist who is tasked with making music, what was significant about this album for you?Dave Simonett: I guess a couple things. The subject matter is one simply because this really is the first time I’ve written a whole record that was really literal about something that happened in my life, you know what I mean? So it was a little bit of a departure from how I’d worked before. Secondly, just kind of a little bit of a break from Trampled By Turtles and doing something with some different guys and different instrumentation. Everything was kind of new I guess, like starting a new band almost.L4LM: Before you took your hiatus with Trampled, had you been pining to revisit sounds you had been making before the band took off? You had had your own electric band beforehand.DS: That was a big motivator for sure. I always have done that, even when Trampled was super busy I’ve always had a side project or something and in the last few years it’s been different formations of this band. But I did want to actually release the record and go on tour. Logistically that was just impossible for me to do when Trampled’s touring, cause I got kids at home, whatever, everyone’s got other shit going on. To try and fit a record and a tour in between Trampled’s busy times was just not going to work. So in order to properly do this thing, it took us having to come off the road for a little bit.L4LM: How does that feel being on your own again?DS: It’s a mix. There’s a certain amount of excitement for a new thing, and creatively, the longer you do something the harder it is to keep it fresh; a relationship, a band, whatever it is. So on that side of things it is really exciting. But it’s got it’s own level of stress and it’s in an arena that I haven’t really worked professionally in for a very long time, like hiring a band and having it be my thing as opposed to being a part of a group. Even just getting ready and getting the tour lined up has been interesting and I’ve learned a lot already. But mainly I’m just excited to do it.L4LM: Was the story captured on Furnance, the dissolution of your marriage, was that too personal to be told in a group setting?DS: No I don’t think it was, not necessarily. I think it was more two things coinciding. The material was there so I had that, but at the same time, I had the desire to make a record with a different group. I think it was just timing. I don’t think I would have had a problem making this a Trampled By Turtles record if that’s where I was in my head. The Trampled guys are family so I can do anything with them and I can share anything with them, but it just worked out that way.L4LM: You went out to a cabin for about a week to write these songs. It had been something you’d never done before in terms of your writing process. What prompted you to do that, to go off by yourself, if you had never done it before? Was that on a recommendation from someone or were you just trying something new?DS: It was more of the latter. I had these songs or ideas for songs, I had most of the material boiling in there. But I was having a lot of trouble getting it out. I wrote songs and recorded them and it just wasn’t working. Where I went, in northern Minnesota specifically, but really anywhere in that kind of setting in solitude in the woods in the winter, that’s kind of my peaceful place to go. And I wasn’t in a peaceful place inside so it seemed like the logical thing to do. Got out of the city and just focused. I turned the phone off and just wrote. I kind of always squeezed in songwriting when I could; I think a lot of people work like that. You’re in a van and writing stuff down on a napkin, or for me, I’ll put the kids to bed and stay up late to write. I had time but I never devoted days to do it and it was a really rewarding experience. I’ve actually done it since then too. It’s a little bit intimidating sitting down and saying I’ve got to write for four days, but once I got in the groove it was amazing how freely stuff came out.L4LM: I was a child of divorce and I’m wondering, if you were a child of divorce, how did that frame your thinking during that time? DS: Yeah I was, my parents split up when I was 14 or 15 years old. Because it wasn’t necessarily a foreign entity to me I probably had an opinion of what it was, but it was completely inaccurate. I don’t claim to be unique in this experience; I know tons of people who’ve been through divorce. I guess I don’t really know how it shaped it. I don’t want to say that’s any kind of reason why it happened, but I don‘t have anyway of knowing. But I don’t think it helped (chuckles).My kids definitely went through some stuff, but they’re both very young, five and three now, so they were three and one-and-a-half. So in their world they didn’t have a lot time with us together and they don’t even really remember. So it’s almost merciful in that respect.L4LM: I wanted to talk little bit about specifics on the album. How did you get the musicians together? Two that stand out are guitarist Erik Koskinen and pianist Bryan Nichols. They added some great texture to the songs throughout. DS: Thank you. Those are all really good friends of mine from Minneapolis. I play music with these guys off and on in various things. I play on their recordings, they play on mine, for years. It’s part of a group of guys who play in town together and I have tons of respect for all of them, so it was kind of easy. I’ve been playing Dead Man Winter shows for once in a great while, every six months or something, and lately these have been the guys I’ve been calling to play with me. So everyone on the record was my first choice and everyone was able to do it, so it was pretty organic I guess.L4LM: Do you play any electric guitar on the album or do you stick with the acoustic?DS: I do a little bit of guitar. Man, I love playing the electric guitar. Actually this is the second version of this record that I made. I made a whole other record initially that I ended up scrapping. It had a bunch of different songs on it and some of these same tunes worked up in a different way. But it was all electric guitar.L4LM: That would be a cool thing to hear. It actually leads into my next question. The last song, “You Are Out Of Control,” is probably the biggest departure on the album in terms of the music I’ve ever heard you release. I love it, it is so electric. When I was playing it, it kind of melded into this Dead Meadow song that was next. What was the recording process for that?DS: What is on the record was the first time we ever played the song together. I had the idea for the first part and I knew I kind of wanted it go on for a while, but that was it. So we just started playing and went out. That was actually the only time we’ve played that song together, that take is the only time (laughs). It was just right time, right place in the studio. Everyone just kind of went with whatever they wanted to do and we didn’t feel like we needed to try again.L4LM: I’m always curious of this of artists who write their own songs. These are songs that obviously come from a very emotional place and raw place. How much of the origin of the song do you revisit when you play it live? In other words, if you wrote a song about your dog dying, how much do you relive on stage and how much is it just a song you wrote and are now performing. DS: It’s probably right in between the two. The songs I wrote are now from over two years ago, but I also haven’t really played most of them live so I don’t really know. It’s not going to be water works on stage or anything like that. Making the record was an emotional thing, but once you get on stage, your playing these tunes every night. Just being on stage your brain is in so many places. Your trying not to screw up, your thinking about the actual performance and content a little bit more. It’s actually probably a lot easier, a least for me, it’s not the same for everybody. It’s a lot less emotional now.L4LM: You’re about to go on tour here for the record, your going through April I believe. Once the tour ends are you going to move on to different things or are you going to work this for a little bit? DS: We’re going to be playing through the summer and we’re looking into some fall things as well. I’ve been doing some touring by myself as well, which has been really fun. Past the record cycle, however long that lasts, I don’t really know. The Trampled guys are going to get back together and see where we are at creatively and if we’re going to make a record when I get back. It’s kind of an unknown right now.L4LM: You mentioned you’ve been on a couple solo tours. I saw that you recently went on tour in December with Trampled’s banjo player Dave Carrol. It looked like a lot of fun, just some guys cruising around drinking beer, smoking weed and going skiing. What was that like?DS: (Laughs) It was a blast man. We’ve done it the last three years now. He lives in Steamboat Springs and we just spend a week or ten days or something just cruising around mountain towns in Colorado, it’s the best. I mean, Dave’s one of my best friends and it’s just easy touring, just the two of us driving around in his truck. Really really informal, really low key and its honestly just getting on stage and playing with your buddy. I love doing it, it’s really healthy.L4LM: Now, you’re also kicking off your tour in February at a ski party. How big of a skier are you?DS: Yep, I’m a ski bum (laughs). When I grow up all I want to do is ski.L4LM: What are your favorite mountains?DS: I’m actually at a resort right now, Lutsen, up in northern Minnesota, which is one of my favorites. It’s not on the scale size wise or elevation wise to Colorado, but it’s a great place. Dave and I skied at Steamboat when I was last out there, that place is great. I think one of my favorites I’ve been to a couple time is Squaw Valley in Lake Tahoe.L4LM: That’s where I’m from.DS: That’s great. I love it out there. The snow’s great, you usually get a ton of it, the weather’s awesome, it’s just great.L4LM: One more question for you. Trampled by Turtles was an introduction for me to contemporary string band music, which led to Greensky, Yonder, Travelin McCoury’s, Infamous Stringdusters, all of that stuff. Actually the first time I saw you was when you went on a joint tour with the Stringdusters in Washington D.C. I’m just curious what your relationship is with other string bands like yourselves?DS: Those two in particular, Greensky and Infamous, are all great friends. We’ve played a lot of music together through the years and we’ve all been doing this for about the same time. We’ve played smaller shows back in the day and bigger shows now and both those bands are probably our closest friends we have in that scene for sure. I mean every time we see each other at festivals its a great thing. All very cool dudes, just traveling the road together.L4LM: Thanks so much for hopping on the phone and I hope you have a wonderful rest of your time on the mountain. Dead Man Winter’s Furnace is out this Friday on January 27th, and the full tour dates are listed below. You can also find more information on the Dead Man Winter website. Dead Man Winter Tour DatesFeb 3 – Lutsen, MN – GNDWIRE Records Ski PartyFeb 10 – Minneapolis, MN – First AvenueFeb 17 – Fargo, ND – The AquariumFeb 18 – Duluth, MN – Pizza LuceFeb 19 – Madison, WI – High Noon SaloonFeb 21 – Philadelphia, PA – The Boot & SaddleFeb 23 – Cambridge, MA – The SinclairFeb 24 – New York, NY – Bowery BallroomFeb 25 – Washington, D.C. – The HamiltonFeb 26 – Charleston, WV – Mountain StageMar 9 – Menasha, WI – The Source Public HouseMar 10 – Milwaukee, WI – The Pabst TheaterMar 11 – Chicago, IL – Schubas TavernMar 20 – Bozeman, MT – The Filling StationMar 21 – Missoula, MT – Top Hat LoungeMar 23 – Seattle, WA – Tractor TavernMar 25 – Portland, OR – Aladdin TheaterMar 27 – Arcata, CA – Humbrew’sMar 28 – San Francisco, CA – SlimsMar 29 – Los Angeles, CA – The EchoMar 30 – San Diego, CA – Soda BarMar 31 – Phoenix, AZ – Crescent BallroomApr 1 – Santa Fe, NM – The BridgeApr 2 – Colorado Springs, CO – IvywildApr 4 – Denver, CO – Bluebird Theaterlast_img read more

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first_imgLongtime Grateful Dead photographer Jay Blakesberg is bringing his Between The Dark and Light slideshow and storytelling presentation to West Hollywood, CA’s Sunset Marquis Bar 1200, set for Sunday, June 2nd at 6 p.m. A photographic exhibit and sale will follow the presentation at the Morrison Hotel Gallery.Blakesberg’s Between The Dark and Light slideshow and storytelling presentation falls in between Dead & Company‘s two-night runs at Mountain View, CA’s Shoreline Amphitheater and Los Angeles, CA’s Hollywood Bowl.Jay Blakesberg’s upcoming event is free and space is limited!Fans can view a full list of Dead & Company’s 2019 summer tour dates below.Dead & Company 2019 Summer Tour Dates:FRI 31-May Mountain View, CA Shoreline AmphitheatreSAT 1-Jun Mountain View, CA Shoreline AmphitheatreMON 3-Jun Los Angeles, CA Hollywood BowlTUE 4-Jun Los Angeles, CA Hollywood BowlFRI 7-Jun George, WA The Gorge AmphitheatreSAT 8-Jun George, WA The Gorge AmphitheatreWED 12-Jun Noblesville, IN Ruoff Home Mortgage Music CenterFRI 14-Jun Chicago, IL Wrigley FieldSAT 15-Jun Chicago, IL Wrigley FieldTUE 18-Jun Saratoga Springs, NY Saratoga Performing Arts CenterTHU 20-Jun Camden, NJ BB&T PavilionSAT 22-Jun Foxborough, MA Gillette StadiumSUN 23-Jun New York, NY Citi FieldWED 26-Jun Bristow, VA Jiffy Lube LiveFRI 28-Jun Charlotte, NC PNC Music PavilionSAT 29-Jun Atlanta, GA Cellairis Amphitheatre at LakewoodTUE 2-Jul Dallas, TX Dos Equis PavilionFRI 5-Jul Boulder, CO Folsom FieldSAT 6-Jul Boulder, CO Folsom FieldView Tour Dateslast_img read more

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first_imgHarvard Business School (Harvard Full-Time MBA Profile) and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business (Columbia Full-Time MBA Profile) have joined a growing list of business schools that are adding courses on social media to their MBA curricula, addressing the corporate demand for social-network-savvy employees. The two schools are among at least six that have added courses in the past year that allow students to learn about Internet marketing and social media strategy, according to course syllabi and faculty associated with the classes…Read more herelast_img

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first_imgStarting at noon today and continuing for the next 24 hours, Notre Dame students will cycle for a worthy cause in the Pink Zone Spin-A-Thon. The Spin-A-Thon, now in its second year at Notre Dame, is part of a larger, nationwide cancer-fighting initiative called the Pink Zone. It is sponsored by RecSports, the women’s basketball team and the College of Science. “The Pink Zone is a nationwide NCAA women’s basketball team fundraising initiative specifically for breast cancer research,” said Jennie Phillips, assistant director of fitness and fitness facilities for RecSports. The Spin-A-Thon started when the Pink Zone team reached out to Phillips and RecSports. “Last year, [the Pink Zone planning committee] said, ‘why don’t we have a spin-a-thon on campus so our students can be involved?’” said Phillips. “The natural thought was that RecSports should oversee it because we have a cycling studio and we know how to program, and so last year we started with our first one and it was very successful.” Last year, the RecSports Spin-A-Thon raised $13,000, Gallagher said. The Pink Zone initiative as a whole raised $200,000. This year’s goal is to raise at least $15,000, according to the College of Science website. Phillips said teaming up with the College of Science was a natural choice. “They do a lot of research on different kinds of cancers and Dean Greg Crawford [of the College of Science] is very passionate about doing research and helping find a cure for breast cancer,” Phillips said. “I think when you have the College of Science involved, it adds credibility to the research we’re talking about … It’s what’s happening at Notre Dame, which I think is really great.” The College of Science oversees another Spin-A-Thon at nearby Knollwood Country Club in Granger. Kristen Gallagher, fitness and instructional program coordinator at RecSports, said although Knollwood’s Spin-A-Thon inspired Notre Dame’s in some ways, the on-campus Spin-A-Thon is unique. “It’s really nice to work together with [Knollwood] because they did it first and they gave us some ideas of what we could do for ours, but it’s just way different doing it for students,” Gallagher said. Gallagher said the event will feature food, giveaways and a raffle for a pink cruiser bike. “It’s a 24 hour event, and we break each hour up into a different theme,” she said. Themes include an Ugly Christmas Sweater hour, Mustache Bash hour, and a Go USA hour, during which the film “Miracle will be shown. In addition to the hourly themes, several student clubs, including the Steppers, the Humor Artists and the Juggling Club, have volunteered their talents to entertain participants. Phillips said the best part of participating in the Spin-A-Thon is the real difference it makes in people’s lives. “I think that doing something this simple can have such a huge impact, and I’m always impressed with the effort that the Notre Dame community makes when there’s a cause involved,” Phillips said. Gallagher agreed. “This is a special cause,” she said. “It’s very near and dear to people’s hearts.” To register for the Pink Zone Spin-A-Thon, visit recsports.nd.edu.last_img read more

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first_imgOZZI — an innovative new system that lends students reusable plastic food containers — is now being piloted at the North Dining Hall Marketplace.Allison Mihalich, senior program director of the Office of Sustainability, said the department partnered with Campus Dining to bring OZZI to Notre Dame.“We’re really excited to bring [OZZI] to the North Dining Hall Marketplace,” she said. “It essentially looks like a vending machine kiosk that dispenses reusable to-go containers.” Anna Mason | The Observer The OZZI system, located in North Dining Hall, dispenses reusable plastic containers for student use.The system helps to cut back on single-use plastics and other wasteful food packaging, Mihalich said.“By bringing this system to North Dining Hall Marketplace — where there’s a lot of individually wrapped sandwiches and bagged items or just really any individually packaged items — we’re able to reduce that packaging and have the OZZI containers available for either premade meals or for folks to grab items quickly, not requiring all that individual packaging that’s essential for food safety,” she said.Senior Meredith Soward, who researched reducing disposable plastics last spring, said the system is not only more environmentally sustainable, but also offers health benefits.“Consuming food in a [single-use] plastic container — especially if you reheat that plastic container — can leech harmful toxins into your food that you are then consuming and putting into your body,” she said.Soward said the convenience the system offers will make it attractive to students.“One of the massive benefits is that it requires pretty much no work on the part of the student,” she said. “You don’t have to clean it yourself, you don’t have to do anything but return it back to the vending machine, and then it would be taken by Campus Dining and fully sanitized, so when you came to get another one, you would still have a clean one.”The University of Southern Indiana, among other colleges and universities, has already implemented the OZZI system successfully, she added.“[The system] had paid itself back pretty quickly,” Soward said.Soward said several other locations on campus would benefit from an OZZI system, especially the Duncan Student Center.“[In the Duncan Student Center] there are three eateries, all of which depend exclusively on plastic,” she said.She hopes the system promotes a greater sense of environmental conscientiousness at Notre Dame, she added.“I would say that there’s kind of a moral obligation, especially as a Catholic university, to start transitioning towards these kinds of more sustainable options,” Soward said.Tags: marketplace, North Dining Hall, Office of Sustainability, OZZI, sustainabilitylast_img read more

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first_imgCome to the Cabaret, Old ChumOpening April 24 at Studio 54If you were living under a rock in 1998 and somehow missed the stellar Tony-winning revival of Cabaret, now is your chance! Sam Mendes’ haunting production is back and better than ever at 54 Below, starring Oscar nominee Michelle Williams as Sally Bowles and Alan Cumming reprising the Tony-winning role of the Emcee. Here, life is beautiful. Click for tickets! Give NPH an InchOpening April 22 at the Belasco TheatreInternationally ignored song stylist Hedwig Schmidt is back in New York City! Former child doctor, HIMYM favorite and Tony host extraordinaire Neil Patrick Harris is donning a wig, heels and fishnets in Hedwig and the Angry Inch, the tale of a transgender rock goddess from communist East Berlin. NPH in a dress, spitting beer on unsuspecting theatergoers? In the words of Barney Stinson, this is gonna be legend—wait for it—dary. Click for tickets! View Comments Well whaddya know? The weather actually resembles something close to spring! So bask in the sunshine and see what New York City has to offer before the next blizzard arrives. There is plenty to do this week: A new arrival to Rock of Ages, the return of Neil Patrick Harris (yes!) and Alan Cumming (double yes!), plus Shakespeare, ‘80s style. Here’s our must-see list! Rock Out with a New SherrieBeginning April 21 at the Helen Hayes TheatreThere’s a new small-town girl on the midnight train! Carrie St. Louis will assume the role of Sherrie Christian in the ‘80s jukebox hit Rock of Ages—and she’s coming straight from Sin City! St. Louis has played Sherrie in the Las Vegas production since its January 2013 debut, and she also has the seal of approval from the jukebox heroes themselves: St. Louis sang with Foreigner when they played Vegas. Click for tickets! See Shakespeare in the Age of AlfApril 23 at 54 BelowReady to take a trip back to 1985? Wait, keep reading! There’s a reason we’re traveling back to the era when sax solos in pop songs were completely acceptable: An adorable, John Hughes-flavored musical retelling of Shakespeare’s As You Like It, starring The Book of Mormon’s Nic Rouleau, The Threepenny Opera star Laura Osnes and Glee and Spring Awakening favorite Jenna Ushkowitz. Besides, it’s like, totally Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! Still want us to gag you with a spoon? No? Radical! Click for tickets! Catch Lighting in a BenefitApril 21 at the Lucille Lortel TheatreWanna be one of the first people ever to see The Lightning Thief? See a special one-night-only benefit concert of this new musical based on Percy Jackson children’s book series, starring stage and screen faves Constantine Maroulis, Kathleen Chalfant, Richard Kind, Terrence Mann, Charlotte d’Amboise and more. Best of all, ticket sales will help 15,000 kids see free theater this summer. Click for tickets! Star Files Laura Osneslast_img read more

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first_img The 2003 movie School of Rock starred Jack Black as wannabe rock star Dewey Finn, who poses as a substitute teacher at a prestigious prep school. When he discovers his students’ musical talents, he enlists his fifth-graders to form a rock group and conquer the Battle of the Bands.  “It’s much easier to cast children in New York than it is here [London],” said Lloyd Webber. The composer also revealed that he’ll be using some of the original songs featured in the movie but that “you can’t do heavy metal for hours and hours in the theatre—everyone would be screaming. So they have to be theatrical songs too.” The show isn’t a sure thing though: “I may just pass on it if I feel it isn’t working.” View Commentscenter_img Andrew Lloyd Webber says it’s a “strong possibility” that he’ll premiere his latest tuner, the previously reported stage adaptation of School of Rock, on the Great White Way instead of the West End. It would mark the first time he has done so since Jesus Christ Superstar in 1971. According to The Telegraph, it could head to Broadway first in 2016 because of the “American subject” matter and the  U.K.’s tougher laws about child actors.last_img read more

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first_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on June 25, 2017 Sunset Boulevard View Comments Glenn Closecenter_img Glenn Close is truly the most fun (especially in the kitchen). She is making the rounds in preparation for her return to her Tony-winning role in Sunset Boulevard—literally, in one case. The Tony winner stopped by The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on January 25 to dish about what she loves about her Sunset character, Norma Desmond, and crashing old apartments with her pal, who happens to be Lady Gaga’s mom. But of course, she also had to participate in horse-drawn carriage scooter race with Fallon. Who was victorious? You’ll have to check out the videos below! Star Files Glenn Closelast_img read more

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first_imgGardeners should wear gloves when working near rock borders, piles of wood or debris and other spider hiding places. “Be sure to inspect children’s toys that are kept outside, particularly toys that may not have been used recently such as tricycles, tire swings and jungle gyms,” Roche said. Widow spiders also like unheated sheds and barns. “Prior to indoor plumbing, outhouses were a common site for black widow bites,” Gray said.Roche and Gray have a few pointers to keep spiders at bay. • Don’t rely on pesticides to kill spiders, although they may control the presence of insect prey. • Install weather stripping around doors and windows. Seal areas around pipes and wiring. • Turn outside lights off at night. This will greatly reduce spiders waiting for an insect feast.• Keep yards free of piles of debris and vegetation trimmed.“Application of residual insecticides several days prior to disturbing suspected habitats could reduce populations, but avoidance and personal protection, such as work gloves, are the only guaranteed techniques for bite prevention,” Gray said. Black widows aren’t the only widow spiders spinning irregularly shaped, messy webs throughout the state. Georgia has three species of widow spiders: southern black, northern black and brown. The black widow spider weaving its web in a home’s dark, dusty corner probably did not eat her mate.“They are called widow spiders based on the popular idea of females consuming males during or immediately after copulation,” said Aubree Roche, an entomology graduate student in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Though this behavior has been observed in widow spiders, it’s fairly uncommon.”One notion about widow spiders is true: They are venomous.“Thankfully, black widows are not particularly aggressive and typically scurry for cover when their hiding spot and web are disturbed,” said Elmer Gray, a UGA Cooperative Extension entomologist. “Consequently, confirmed bites are rare.” Bites often happen when people accidentally mash the spider when they pick something up it’s on, Roche said. Widow spider venom “is typically not lethal to humans, although it can make you sick,” Roche said. About 4 percent to 5 percent of people bitten have a severe reaction or die from widow spider bites.A black widow’s bite feels like a pinprick or an immediate sharp, burning pain with little or no swelling. Anyone, especially children, bitten by a widow spider should be taken to the emergency room immediately in order to reduce the pain and sickness that may follow a bite. “As with any spider bite, you should try to capture the suspected spider and preserve it in rubbing alcohol or freeze it in a Zip-loc storage bag,” Gray said. “Your local extension agent should be able to assist in the proper identification of specimens not destroyed during the collection process.” Outdoor caution Ouch, she bit mecenter_img By Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of Georgia Volume XXXIIINumber 1Page 21 last_img read more

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first_imgOpportunities Credit Union has announced an innovative business loan for Sugarsnap LLC.  Along with VEDA (Vermont Economic Development Authority), Opportunities Credit Union is helping fund the expansion of this six year old company which is opening its second retail store, an expanded commercial kitchen, and new line of preserved food products.  Abbey Duke opened Sugarsnap on Riverside Avenue in Burlington in 2003 with two business partners.  The small food business has managed its own Intervale farm, catering business, and retail outlet on Riverside Avenue.  Duke bought out her partners in early 2009, and considered her goal to keep growing her farm-based business.   She teamed up with Rob Smart, who brought 20 years of experience in community-scale renewable energy experience and an MBA from the University of Washington.  Together they approached Sandy Croft of VEDA with their vision of the future. According to Smart, financing a food business required a lender willing to embrace both financial and community-based returns.   VEDA lender, Sandy Croft, introduced Smart and Duke to Greg Huysman, small business lender for Opportunities Credit Union.  “We love it when we are able to help small businesses with missions that align with ours,” said Huysman, “It makes sense for a creative company to work with a creative lender to grow jobs and support local farmers.”   With commitments from VEDA and Opportunities Credit Union, Sugarsnap was also able to attract multiple private investors.  “It was vital for us to get this support from the state of Vermont and a local credit union early,” said Smart.Sugarsnap will be renovating and improving their current Riverside site, opening a second retail site at Technology Park in South Burlington, and building a state of the art commercial kitchen.  “The combination of attractively priced loans from the lenders and patient capital from our investors,” says Smart, “means Sugarsnap can expand its reach and maintain its reputation as a trusted source of the best food possible.”  Source: OCU. 5.7.2010last_img read more

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