May 12, 2021
  • 5:18 am Reese Witherspoon pays $16M for Brentwood mansion
  • 5:18 am Biden to extend limits on evictions, foreclosures
  • 5:18 am NYC escapees buying commercial real estate in Hudson Valley
  • 5:17 am UAE-based GII closes its biggest trade with $301M purchase of Paris’ Altais Towers
  • 5:16 am Adam Neumann gets $22M for California estate

first_imgFinal Reading of Rezoning Ordinance VC-7-2018 as Amended County Health: Lead Hazard Reduction Grant with the Indiana Housing & Community Development AuthorityCommunity Development Block Grant for Disaster Relief and Restoration of InfrastructureSTD Grant Amendment County Engineering:Department Report Pay Request # 45 U.S. 41 Expansion T.I.F. for the sum of $13,830.00Pay Request # 38 University Parkway T.I.F. for the sum of $14,220.43Pay Request #9 Phoenix Commerce Center for the sum of $ 3,320.00Travel Request for 2018 County Bridge Conference Claims  Department Head ReportsNew BusinessOld BusinessConsent ItemsContracts, Agreements and LeasesSuperintendent of County Buildings: Old Courthouse LeasesKraftwerks, Inc Special Event Lease for Fall Craft ShowArtwork Unlimited Lease for Subbasement CERM Lease for Suite 201Progressive Image Photography Lease Renewal for Suite 113Wham Counseling, LLC Lease Renewal for Suite 108Dax Miller Law Offices Lease Renewal for Suite 111New Vision Counseling Lease Renewal for Suite 107 Petitioner: Jack Strassweg, Member of SS&K, LLCAddress: 728 E. Baseline RoadRequest: Change from Ag to C-4 with Amended UDCAdjournmentFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare civic center AGENDA of Vanderburgh CountyBoard of CommissionersSeptember 18, 2018 at 3:00 pm, Room 301Call to OrderAttendancePledge of AllegianceAction Items Update from Greg Wathen on the Economic Development Coalition of Southwest Indiana Resolution NO. CO.R-09-18-014 Issuance of Bonds to Finance Certain Future Public Improvements in or Serving the Burkhardt Road TIF Economic Development AreaResolution NO.CO.R-09-18-015 Adopting the City of Evansville- Town of Darmstadt- Vanderburgh County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan Committee Process Concerning the Updated Five Year PlanCounty Commissioners: Award Title Search Quotes center_img Public CommentRezoningFirst Reading of Rezoning Ordinance VC-8-2018 Petitioner: Baseline Properties, Inc.Address: Baseline Park Lots 1 through 5Request: Change from M-2 to M-1 Approval of September 4, 2018 Meeting MinutesEmployment Changes County Auditor: 9/3/18-9/7/18 & 9/10/18- 9/14/18 Claims Voucher Report United Neighborhoods of Evansville: August 2018 Monthly Report Request for Wavier Fees at the Old National Events Plaza:Human Relation Commission October 16, 2018 for the Commissions Annual Dinner Grow Southwest Indiana Workforce October 23, 2018 for Job Fair from 1:00-3:00 pm  County Clerk: August 2018 Monthly ReportSoil and Water Conservation District: County Vehicle Transfer last_img read more

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first_img Twitter IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Potawatomi Zoo needs help naming its new endangered turtles Facebook Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Previous articleSouth Bend Venues Parks & Arts accepting art submissions for Howard ParkNext articleCassopolis woman injured in hit-and-run crash Carl Stutsman By Carl Stutsman – July 13, 2020 1 309 WhatsApp Facebook Google+ Google+ (Tom Franklin/95.3 MNC) The Potawatomi Zoo is looking for your help in naming two of their newest animal friends. A Pair of Blanding’s Turtles have moved into the pond where they house Humvee the Porcupine.The Blanding’s Turtle is a native to the great lakes region but is listed as an endangered species in Indiana. Blanding’s Turtles live to be up to 75 years old.You can submit your suggestions directly on the Potawatomi Zoo Facebook pagelast_img read more

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first_imgThe CMA has a dedicated reporting hotline for cartels (0203 738 6888) and recently launched a new campaign to encourage more people to come forward with information that will help it stamp out illegal cartel activity.Notes to Editor The CMA is the UK’s primary competition and consumer authority. It is an independent non-ministerial government department with responsibility for carrying out investigations into mergers, markets and the regulated industries and enforcing competition and consumer law. CPL (CPL Distribution Limited and CPL Industries Holdings Limited together ‘CPL’) has agreed to pay a penalty of £2,816,514. Fuel Express Limited, Fuel Express (Bagnalls) Limited (previously known as Bagnalls Haulage Limited), Carbo (UK) Limited and G.N. Grosvenor Limited (together ‘Fuel Express’) will pay a penalty of £627,867. These penalty figures are after a 20% reduction for settlement to reflect the fact that the companies have admitted breaking competition law and have agreed to follow a streamlined procedure for the remainder of the case. The penalties will not become payable until after the CMA has issued a formal infringement decision imposing the penalties and setting out the CMA’s findings in full, together with the basis for the calculation of the penalties. The CMA is today issuing a formal statement of objections with a view to issuing a final decision shortly afterwards. Enquiries should be directed to the CMA press team at [email protected] or 020 3738 6191. CPL and Fuel Express are 2 of the main suppliers of bagged household fuels, including coal and firelogs, and charcoal for barbecues, to large national supermarkets and petrol stations.They have agreed to pay the fines for breaking competition law after a CMA investigation led them to admit rigging competitive tenders to supply Tesco and Sainsbury’s. For each of the tenders concerned, they agreed that one of them would submit a higher bid that was designed to lose – so that the existing supplier could retain ‘its’ customer. This is a form of bid-rigging under which competitors share out the market between them. They also exchanged competitively-sensitive confidential pricing information.The CMA’s investigation started after intelligence work following a tip off to the CMA’s cartels hotline led the authority to carry out surprise inspections at the premises of the 2 suppliers.The investigation revealed that the companies had engaged in this illegal market sharing arrangement from June 2010 to February 2011.Stephen Blake, CMA Senior Director for Cartels, said:center_img Millions of people buy these products to help keep their homes warm in winter and to fire up their barbecues in summer, so it’s important that shoppers are offered the best price. This will only happen when companies compete fairly. Market sharing and bid rigging are illegal. They skew the market so businesses don’t have to compete for customers, who in turn are cheated out of a fair deal and can end up paying higher prices or having to make do with poorer quality products or services. Today’s announcement shows how seriously we take this type of activity. It’s important that all businesses play by the rules and the CMA will pursue those who break the law.last_img read more

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first_imgLotus Bakeries has appointed Alexandra Fisher as the company’s new category marketing manager and Larysa Dushko as key account manager for retail sales.Fisher will drive research and analysis across the top five retailers, with some focus on convenience, for Lotus Biscoff biscuits and Lotus Biscoff Spreads, while Dushko will focus on expanding and developing sales in the convenience channel. “The appointment of these two new roles highlights the increased investment Lotus is putting into developing brand recognition and household penetration in the UK,” said Frances Booth, UK category marketing manager for Lotus Bakeries.Prior to joining Lotus Bakeries, Fisher worked as a revenue manager and category manager at Kellogg’s across key accounts, while Dushko worked as a key account manager for wine supplier Majestic Commercial.last_img read more

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first_imgAs a progressive female professor at Wellesley College in the 1980s, Peggy McIntosh refused to believe she could be contributing to the oppression of others. She recalls trying to come up with any instance in which she was benefiting from unearned privilege in her everyday life.“In the middle of the night, up swam an example,” said McIntosh, now associate director of the Wellesley Centers for Women and a highly regarded anti-racism activist. “I flicked on the light and I wrote it down. In the next three months, 46 examples came to me,” everything from “I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group” to “I can choose blemish cover or bandages in ‘flesh’ color and have them more or less match my skin.”That list became a groundbreaking article, “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack,” that turned out to be the most important work of McIntosh’s career. Last Thursday (Dec. 13), McIntosh shared the story of her personal awakening to her privilege, and helped counsel the large crowd of Harvard faculty and staff through their own struggles with the difficult subject, in the second of this year’s diversity dialogues hosted by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS).Conversations about privilege can be tricky. Examining one’s own advantages and disadvantages objectively can be just as difficult as raising the subject in the workplace. But acknowledging our own privilege — and using those advantages to help level the playing field for everyone — is essential in the fight against racism and sexism, McIntosh told the audience at the Radcliffe Gymnasium.“Becoming an ally to those who are not very good at making it through the system is a great way of using what privilege you do have to help those who have less,” McIntosh said. “You can use the power you have to bring other people along, to lessen bureaucracy, to make others feel welcome and included, fully.”As a younger woman, McIntosh said, she often wondered why male faculty at Wellesley — “very nice men” — were so dismissive of the idea of including women’s studies or women’s history in the college’s first-year curriculum. (“When you’re trying to lay the foundation stones for knowledge, you can’t put in soft stuff,” she recalled one man saying.)“I thought I had to choose: Either these men were nice, as I knew they were, or they were oppressive,” she said. “But niceness has nothing to do with it.” It wasn’t that her colleagues were mean or overtly sexist, she said, but that they had been raised unquestioningly in a system that told them “that knowledge is male, that men are knowers,” and that women’s experiences weren’t appropriate for the college classroom.If her male colleagues didn’t react well to being told they were out of touch, McIntosh didn’t fare much better when she first encountered her own white privilege.“I realized I had been expecting thanks for working with people I had been taught to look down on,” she said of her interactions with her minority colleagues. “I thought that I was so nice that I would have disguised my racism. … But my assumption that my people should be in charge made me oppressive to work with.”Acting on autopilot, she said, many of us may second-guess or mistrust our colleagues who are different from us, especially if we are part of a group — male or white, wealthy or heterosexual — that holds more cultural sway. But we can choose to ignore that cultural hardwiring and remind ourselves to listen to our colleagues who are different from us and to value their perspectives, she said.“White privilege is like a bank account I was given,” McIntosh said. “I didn’t ask for it, but I can spend it down. And because it’s white privilege, it’ll keep refilling.”As McIntosh led the audience through exercises and took questions from the crowd, it was clear that the topic resonated, in both practical and emotional terms, with many faculty and staff in attendance.Alex Storer, a research technology consultant for the Institute of Quantitative Social Science who often trains faculty and staff on quantitative analysis software, wondered if the power imbalance already inherent in his client sessions was “exacerbated by the fact that my colleagues and I are all white men.” (McIntosh’s advice? Sit beside the person as you guide them through the learning process. “Become a human, not an expert.”)After the talk, Storer said that being attuned to racial, gender, or cultural sensitivities is essential to doing his job well.“I think to be as helpful as possible, which is the goal of our team, it’s important to meet people on a playing field that makes them feel comfortable and enables as much learning and productivity as possible,” he said.“If you spend time with people who don’t think about their privilege very much, it can be really easy to forget how much privilege you have,” he continued. “It’s not something that’s on the tips of everyone’s tongues. … I think one of the values of coming to this sort of event is that you can really be reminded how much more work there is to do.”The final diversity dialogue of the academic year, “Almost a Woman,” will feature author, screenwriter, and essayist Esmeralda Santiago and introductory remarks by Judith Singer, senior vice provost for Faculty Development and Diversity. The event will take place on April 3 from 10 a.m. to noon in the Radcliffe Gym, 10 Garden St. The workshop is free and open to all.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) is pleased to announce the appointment of two distinguished technological leaders, Aneesh Chopra and Nick Sinai, as the inaugural recipients of the newly established Walter Shorenstein Media and Democracy Fellowship.Chopra and Sinai will work in partnership as joint Walter Shorenstein Media and Democracy Fellows. Together, they will drive an ambitious program on data as public infrastructure and speak widely, write, and investigate the media, policy and economic implications of providing greater public access to government data. Sinai, currently the U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer, will begin his six-month residency at the Center beginning on December 1. Chopra, the first U.S. Chief Technology Officer, plans to be in residence periodically.“Open data is improving government service delivery, empowering citizens, and fueling economic growth. Taxpayers paid for vast troves of data, and wherever possible, they should be accessible to everyone — instead of being trapped in government systems,” said Sinai. “The Obama Administration has made significant progress opening up data, and I look forward to continuing to work on this important issue at the Shorenstein Center at Harvard Kennedy School.”last_img read more

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first_imgThe Experience Project intends to shed light on religious and transformative experiences and their respective effects on people’s lives. The project is supported by a $5.1 million grant, co-directed by Notre Dame professors of philosophy Michael Rea and Samuel Newlands, as well as professor of philosophy Laurie Ann Paul of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and awarded $1.7 million to 22 research projects in order to explore the long-held questions of these experiences.“The psychology and sociology that we’re funding is all focusing on the concept of transformative experiences,” Rea said.  “Transformative experiences, in the sense that we’re interested in, are ones where you have no real access to what it’s like to have the experience or really what its value or disvalue might be to you until you have the experience.“ … So what the psychologists and sociologists are exploring is, ‘What are some experiences that are transformative in this way? How do people make decisions about them? What kind of transformations are brought on by them?’”Rea referred to an argument of his colleague, Paul, to illustrate one type of this experience.“She’s argued that no amount of just being told what it’s like to have a kid … no amount of research of the topic is really going to tell you what the value or disvalue of that experience will be for you, or really what it would be like for you in particular to have a child, because it’s such an impactful event in your life. She thinks that there’s no way, really, to kind of make rational decisions whether to undertake this.”According to a University press release, the Experience Project is funding a non-residential project called “Receptivity of God through Ritual,” by Terence Cuneo, a professor of philosophy at the University of Vermont.“He’s exploring religious experience in liturgy,” Rea said. “ … sort of talking about the way in which the liturgies of the church help to kind of cultivate a sort of sense of the presence of God, a capacity for experiencing God, experiencing the presence of God, and so on.”Rea hinted at the rarity of this type of research.“We have a whole liturgical studies program here, but there aren’t many people that are doing the philosophy of liturgy,” Rea said. “So that’s one kind of exciting project.” Rea described a funded residential project by a colleague that is exploring the nature and experience of divine forgiveness.“One question he’s asking is what it is to be forgiven, what forgiveness consists in, what kind of standing God has to forgive our sins,” he said. “If I commit a sin against somebody, you couldn’t walk in and forgive me for that unless you’re the somebody I sinned against. So why can God walk in and forgive us for that? So [Cueno] is exploring those issues and also questions about just how it is that we experience God’s forgiveness.”Rea said the project is still in its beginning stages and a lot of research is still in its infancy.“We just had a big collaborative workshop with our scientists last weekend, where we … got summaries of all the psychology and sociology projects that are being done,” Rea said. “Some of the psychologists have actually started taking data already. I mean it’s all the very beginning stages, but they’ve got at least a month’s worth of data now.”Rea said the project will develop in many forms including a book and a lecture series.“My research project, under the auspices of this grant, is a book on divine hiddenness,” Rea said. “I’ve got a third to half of that book drafted. And that’s going to become [the] Gifford Lectures in 2017.“ … Laurie and I are supposed to write an article together on religious experience and transformative experience that … draws on some of those connections.”Tags: Laurie Ann Paul, Michael Rea, Notre Dame, Samuel Newlands, The Experience Projectlast_img read more

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first_img Host Walter Reeves shows how easily you can make stepping stones by pouring mortar mix into a mold. He tells where you can buy molds and shows some fun things you can use that weren’t intended to be molds. Then he takes the viewer through step-by-step directions. On this week’s GPTV show, “The Georgia Gardener” tells all about making stepping stones for your landscape. “The Georgia Gardener” is designed specifically for gardeners in Georgia. This week’s show will air on GPTV at 7:30 on Thursday, Oct. 14, and will be rebroadcast at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 16. Reeves also shows how simple it can be to make your own round or hexagonal molds. Finally, he shows how to install your new stepping stones in your landscape. The show is produced by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and PFC Holding Company.last_img read more

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first_imgSouth Korea’s Green New Deal a ‘stunningly ambitious’ transition for coal-dominated country FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Channel News Asia:When South Korea’s Democratic Party, under the leadership of President Moon Jae-in, romped to a comprehensive victory in national elections last month, it signaled overwhelming confidence in the incumbent government during a period of crisis.In effect, it also endorsed Moon’s newly launched climate change policy, which he has dubbed South Korea’s Green New Deal, echoing language used in Europe and the United States for a transformative agenda to shift away from damaging fossil fuels.It puts the country, which is currently the seventh biggest carbon polluter in the world, on a crash course with a painful, controversial but necessary overhaul of its energy systems. The action plan that the government announced in March – including a large-scale investment in renewable energy, the phasing out of coal operations and financing, a new carbon tax and a target of zero net emissions by 2050 – is at odds with much of the existing infrastructure and policies.Achieving these goals for South Korea will be a more challenging task than in many other nations trying to make similar changes to their power production, according to leading regional energy expert, Melissa Brown.“Generally speaking at a diplomatic level, you have a very comfortable embrace of green themes, green topics and the trappings of deep environmentalism. (But) the reality of the ground normally doesn’t match. It’s been a point of contention in Korea,” said Brown, the director of Energy Finance Studies, Asia at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis. “When we talk about the Green New Deal and trying to redirect Korea, it can seem a stunningly ambitious exercise.”South Korea relies on coal for about 44 per cent of its power needs presently. The non-nuclear renewable sector, including wind and solar is underdeveloped and accounted for less than 2 percent of production in 2018.[Jack Board]More: South Korea’s Green New Deal ‘stunningly ambitious’ for one of region’s top polluterslast_img read more

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first_img Visions Federal Credit Union’s Director of Government Affairs Patricia Shermot received NAFCU’s 2019 Paul Revere Award at the association’s annual Congressional Caucus. The Paul Revere Award recognizes a NAFCU-member credit union advocate who goes to great lengths in his or her grassroots and political efforts.“Patricia’s advocacy has been invaluable to the credit union industry and its 118 million members, and has helped ensure credit unions continue to have a strong voice in Washington,” said NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger. “It is with my great pleasure to honor Patricia with the 2019 Paul Revere Award for her commitment to our industry’s cooperative, not-for-profit mission.”“It is an honor to be recognized with NAFCU’s Paul Revere Award,” said Shermot. “Credit unions provide tremendous value to their members and local communities, and I am proud to advocate on our industry’s behalf. With the ongoing support of our President/CEO and leadership team, I look forward to continuing to be a strong, reliable grassroots advocate.” From left: NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger, Visions FCU’s Director of Government Affairs and Paul Revere Award winner Patricia Shermot, NAFCU Board Chair Jeanne Kucey, and NAFCU Director of Political Affairs Chad Adams. (Photo by Greg Dohler) continue reading »center_img 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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