May 12, 2021
  • 5:18 am Reese Witherspoon pays $16M for Brentwood mansion
  • 5:18 am Biden to extend limits on evictions, foreclosures
  • 5:18 am NYC escapees buying commercial real estate in Hudson Valley
  • 5:17 am UAE-based GII closes its biggest trade with $301M purchase of Paris’ Altais Towers
  • 5:16 am Adam Neumann gets $22M for California estate

first_imgShare via Shortlink Reese Witherspoon (Getty)Actress Reese Witherspoon and her media executive husband Jim Toth paid $15.9 million for a Brentwood estate, in a deal that closed early in the pandemic but was not previously known.Their purchase of the 9,500-square-foot home on three acres and down a private road was first reported in Variety. The English Country-style mansion has seven bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a three-car attached garage and a large outdoor fireplace.The March acquisition may explain why the Oscar-winning actress and her husband sold their 10,300-square-foot Pacific Palisades mansion in April, for $17 million to AutoZone heiress Robin Formanek. They also unloaded a Malibu ranch home in November for $6.7 million to Meg Haney, daughter of real estate developer Franklin Haney. Witherspoon and Toth have a home in Nashville, Tennessee, according to the report.For the Brentwood purchase, the sellers were Michael and Joyce Ostin, Variety reported. Drew Fenton of Hilton & Hyland and Dena Luciano of Douglas Elliman had the listing while Tami Pardee and Matt Freeman of Halton Pardee and Partners brought the buyer.Brentwood has seen a flurry of celebrity property selling in the last few months. In December, former Los Angeles Clippers star and current Detroit Pistons player Blake Griffin paid $5.9 million for a home behind the mansion he bought in the spring. In November, ex-Zillow CEO Spencer Rascoff paid $5.7 million for a 1950s-era home near his mansion. The same month, former WeWork executive Michael Gross listed the Brentwood mansion he bought in 2019 from Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac for $32 million. [Variety] — Alexi Friedman  Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img TagsCelebrity Real EstateLA luxury real estatelast_img read more

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first_imgThank you Tom for that warm welcome. Good morning everyone. It’s great to be here with you today, whichever part of the education spectrum you hail from.I want to start by talking about the diversity of schools in this country, which is one of our education system’s greatest strengths – whether we talk about academies, free schools, LA-maintained schools, faith schools, grammars, 11-16, 11-18, all manner of schools – all make an invaluable contribution to their communities and to young people.In everything we’ve been doing to improve education, we have put a strong focus on handing power back to schools, back to school leaders like yourselves, recognising that you are the ones best placed to make the right decisions for those pupils and those communities.I trust you to get on with the job and I know the last thing you need is me or indeed anyone else, getting in your way.I know many of you here – and the clue is in the name – are from academies, where autonomy is at the heart of what you do. This model is delivering consistently high standards and I want to congratulate all of you here who are helping to make it such a success.I firmly believe that becoming an academy can bring enormous benefits to schools and their pupils.And that’s often about coming together as a trust. Multi-Academy Trusts are powerful vehicles for improving schools – by sharing expertise, working collaboratively, driving improvements. This is something we want to see more of, because it repeatedly shows that it can improve outcomes for pupils.Take the WISE Academies in the North East, which has taken on nine sponsored academies since 2012, all of which had serious performance concerns. Since then every single school inspected has been judged as good or outstanding by Ofsted.Recently we passed an important milestone: a majority of children in state-funded schools in England are now taught in an academy or free school – and standards are rising faster in many sponsored academies than in similar council-run schools.At the end of 2017, 1 in 10 sponsored academy schools were judged good or outstanding before they converted, compared to almost 7 in 10 after they became an academy. These results really are worth celebrating and go to show the great power of collaboration between schools.But there are some areas, particularly where schools are trying to get the most for their money, where collaboration is best done at national level.Now I do know it’s really challenging to balance your books, especially when costs are going up.Advertising for new staff is a near-constant task for many heads and administrators. It also gobbles up chunks of precious budgets that could be better spent elsewhere. So we have launched a new service to give schools practical support with recruitment and ease some of the financial burdens that come with recruiting new staff.All state schools in England can now access a free job-listing service called Teaching Vacancies. I encourage you, if you are not already doing so, to use it.PriceWaterhouseCoopers estimate that the school sector could save around £75m per year on teacher recruitment, which could be better invested in the classroom.I urge you to go and visit the team at the DfE stand where they’ll get you up to speed to use this service and begin saving money right away.We also have a range of deals, advice and support that can help reduce some of your cost pressures and free up resources to reinvest back into the classroom, from energy and water to IT and photocopying.We are currently piloting Complete Curriculum Programmes, whole packages of resources which will deliver a subject across an entire key stage.These are intended to not only make sure children are learning what they need to but also to reduce teaching workloads and save schools money. We are exploring how we can share these more widely across the sector, giving more teachers a framework from which to support the planning and delivery of lessons, saving hours across a week for teachers and leaders.And we need to have an informed marketplace where people can buy with confidence and that also makes it more effective and more efficient for sellers to market their wares.Now one area where schools can seek to achieve better value for money is through educational technology. Or EdTech. And I want to focus my remaining remarks particularly on this.Technology can be one of the single most important elements in the educational arsenal. It can act as a catalyst for those who learn and those who teach, transforming the experiences of both.But – and there’s always a ‘but’ – EdTech also presents the education sector with unique challenges. In fact I’d say that education is one of the few areas where technology has as often been linked with an increase in workload, not a decrease.What I sometimes hear from teachers is that far from tools that are hard to imagine living without, they have a ‘cupboard of shame’, full of all the tech kit that seemed such a good idea at the time but which in reality has hardly been used.To deal with this unintended consequence, and others like it, we need schools and leaders to be able to understand more clearly, the benefits that specific technology tools can offer them, but we also need those developers and programmers to come up with more precisely engineered solutions for our sector.Take behaviour management for example. This is an issue for schools across the board of course. We have heard plenty of anecdotes where one member of staff ends up going from classroom to classroom, collecting information about detentions, before inputting them into a central database and finally sending emails or texts to parents.If you multiply that across the term you could be looking at about 500 hours every school year. Yet there are tech solutions which can allow teachers in class to mark detentions instantly into an automated system which does all of that. And then those 500 hours become negligible.Other sectors have made enormous strides in how technology is used to make step changes in efficiency and the services they provide.I don’t want our sector to be left behind and we owe it to all our young people to grasp that technology nettle.So today I am announcing the launch of our new strategy for education technology called “Realising the potential of technology in Education”. This will set the direction we need to take to make the most of the digital revolution.This is not about tech for tech’s sake and it is definitely not about issuing diktats to schools about what they should be using and how and when they should be using it.Instead, it marks the start of an important conversation about the place for technology in education. I want our world class education sector to be at the forefront of this conversation – and to be shaping how innovation can help schools drive efficiencies, help drive down teacher workload and ultimately of course make the learning experience a better, more successful one, for all children and young people.I’ll come on to how that conversation will develop in a minute but before that, I’d like to talk you through some of the strategy’s immediate developments.I am bringing together a group of leading education and technology experts to work collaboratively and inform our future direction about how we are going to use technology more effectively in schools and colleges. It will report back by the end of this year.In addition, we will launch a network of demonstrator schools and colleges across the country. This is really important because it will give teachers the chance to see how others are using technology and how something works as it were in the flesh. It’s all very well being sold a package that looks as if it is the answer to your data-crunching dreams only to find that once you get it back to school it’s a total nightmare to run.The demonstrator schools and colleges will also help staff and teachers learn how to embed and use the tools that could work for them within their broader vision and plans for their specific school. Not planning strategically in this way is often, I’m afraid, one of the main barriers to successful use of technology.I want all teachers and school leaders to have the chance to develop and improve their skills and confidence when using technology. The new strategy will offer opportunities for further peer-to-peer learning. We have also created free online CPD [Continuing Professional Development] courses with the Chartered College, so more teachers and school leaders can increase their skills and confidence right across the sector.I talked earlier about easing the financial burdens for schools and the EdTech strategy will help with this by offering access to different approaches to purchasing. For example by supporting a service run by the British Educational Suppliers Association called LendEd. This will enable schools to actually try before they buy, and share feedback on specific tech, with other schools.Then, if you do go on to buy whatever product you’ve been testing, you have the reassurance of knowing that the companies involved have been vetted by the British Educational Suppliers Association.It’s important that consumers and providers collaborate and this gets to the nub of what this strategy is all about. I am issuing 10 specific challenges that I want education experts and the technology industry to come together to solve. We have set aside a £10 million in order to help to drive it forward.The challenges cover areas where there is potential for technology to make a real difference and where we need to galvanise activity, where we need greater innovation but where we also need to know whether or not technology will actually do what is needed. The challenges address administration, assessment, parental engagement, assistive technology, workforce flexibility, lifelong learning and the professional development of teachers.And of course when technology works it can be truly transformative. Take City of London Academy in Southwark, where students with learning difficulties like dyslexia, use a computer for summative assessments. The computer uses software that can overcome difficulties with handwriting, reading and spelling which means students are able to type legibly, quickly and read text out loud. Text-to-speech lets them listen to questions and proofread their answers.I can announce that we will launch competitions to promote innovation and collaboration, as well as test-bed schools and colleges to determine what is possible. These test beds will work together with industry, as well as other schools and colleges to help trial and of course assess the impact of new innovations.We are working in partnership with Nesta, the global innovation foundation, on several of the challenges. This partnership will see both industry and government funding being used to support EdTech innovation in schools and colleges. These challenges relate to essay marking, formative assessment, parental engagement and timetabling technology.Through this partnership we expect to share new insights about the way industry must develop products to meet the needs of teachers and students.I am confident and excited that the changes we’ve announced today, are practical and going to have a material benefit for teachers, schools and for young people.I hope you all get what you want from the show today, that you will see things to inspire you, to motivate you, that you find new ways of solving old problems. Most importantly, I hope that you use the occasion to share your knowledge and experience with others.Thank you.last_img read more

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first_imgThe UK’s largest pasty operator has announced an underlying profit of £551,000, despite having posted a pre-tax loss of £195,000.Turnover for West Cornwall Pasty Co (WCPC) in the 50-week trading period ending 31 March 2015 was £12.5m. This represented an improvement of more than £1.3m on the period ending March 2014, when, under previous ownership, the business said it had lost over £800,000.In the 50-week period ending 31 March 2015, the company acquired 33 retail units, two seasonal sites and a franchise agreement with MOTO Hospitality from the administrator of West Cornwall Pasty Realisations.Long-term contract signedWCPC also lost two retail sites, which the report described as “challenging”, as “it was not possible to agree terms with the landlords to remain in occupation”. But in more encouraging news, commercial director Leigh Dale told British Baker that a new long-term contract had been signed with England Rugby Union corporate hospitality business Twickenham Experience, which “covers the period through to the end of the 2018/19 season”.West Cornwall Pasty Co is known for its multi award-winning, handmade PGI status Cornish pasties, and the report said that it was now focused on the ’food-to-go’ market and its own brand coffee, St Just.last_img read more

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first_imgAnderson .Paak is unstoppable. After his incredible collaborations with Dr. Dre on his 2015 album Compton, .Paak started a global assault on the music industry, delivering his huge breakthrough album Malibu before appearing at what seemed like every major music festival around the world. The artists has combined hip-hop and R&B with funk and punk, essentially creating a new genre along the way. His drumming is determined and tight, and his band, The Free National, easily move from one genre to the next in the live setting – ultimately creating a vibe that pretty much everyone can get down to.Now, Anderson .Paak is preparing to move in a new direction, as he will be releasing a new album with Kendrick Lamar producer Knxwledge under the name NxWorries. The duo actually released an EP a few weeks before Malibu dropped, and this new LP is an expansion on the project that they started last year. The new album, entitled Yes Lawd, is due out on October 21st on Stones Throw Records, and will feature nineteen tracks, seventeen of which are brand new, never before-heard recordings. “Link Up” and “Suede” both made the cut from their original EP.The duo have also released their first single from Yes Lawd, called “Lyk Dis”. Paak’s crooning vocals mix perfectly with Knxwledge’s sultry, J. Dilla-esque beat, and the result is a smooth, catchy and introspective R&B number. Check out “Lyk Dis” below, and also check out the music video for “Suede”, originally released in August 2015.last_img read more

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first_imgKing Crimson is currently preparing for a big “outreach year” in honor of their 50th anniversary. In addition to an extensive world tour, the band has announced a number of special anniversary releases.At a press event on Saturday, the band’s manager, David Singleton, also announced that King Crimson’s entire 13-album studio discography will soon be available to stream via Spotify. The King Crimson catalog will appear on Spotify beginning on June 10th—the day the band kicks off their world tour in Leipzig, Germany.“The reason we’ve been slow on Spotify is that, unlike apparently the whole of the rest of the industry that’s been telling us that physical is dead, we’ve had rising physical sales for probably the last 10 years,” Singleton explained, according to The Rolling Stone. “But that argument was valid for a while, and it isn’t anymore.”Check out a list of King Crimson’s upcoming world tour dates below. For more information and ticketing details, head here.King Crimson World Tour Dates06/10 – Leipzig, DE @ Haus Auensee06/12 – Frankfurt, DE @ Jahrhunderthalle06/13 – Frankfurt, DE @ Jahrhunderthalle06/15 – Stuttgart, DE @ Liederhalle06/16 – Stuttgart, DE @ Liederhalle06/18 – London, UK @ Royal Albert Hall06/19 – London, UK @ Royal Albert Hall06/20 – London, UK @ Royal Albert Hall06/22 – Nijmegen, NL @ De Vereeniging06/23 – Nijmegen, NL @ De Vereeniging06/26 – Warsaw, PL @ Teatr Roma06/27 – Warsaw, PL @ Teatr Roma06/29 – Berlin, DE @ Zitadelle07/04 – Basel, CH @ Romisches Theater Augusta Ruarica07/08 – Verona, IT @ Arena Di Verona07/10 – Torino, IT @ Stupinigi Sonic Park07/12 – Cataluna, ES @ Doctor Music Festival07/13 – Cataluna, ES @ Doctor Music Festival07/14 – Cataluna, ES @ Doctor Music Festival07/18 – Perugia, IT @ Arena Santa Giuliana08/23 – Mexico City, MX @ Teatro Metropolitan08/24 – Mexico City, MX @ Teatro Metropolitan08/26 – Guadalajara, MX @ Teatro Diana08/27 – Guadalajara, MX @ Teatro Diana08/29 – Mexico City, MX @ Teatro Metropolitan08/30 – Mexico City, MX @ Teatro Metropolitan09/03 – Los Angeles, CA @ Greek Theatre09/05 – Oakland, CA @ Fox Theater09/06 – Oakland, CA @ Fox Theater09/08 – Denver, CO @ Paramount Theatre09/10 – Chicago, IL @ Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University09/12 – Washington, DC @ Warner Theatre09/14 – Toronto, ON @ Budweiser Stage09/17 – Montreal, QC @ St Denis Theatre09/19 – Boston, MA @ Wang Theater09/21 – New York, NY @ Radio City Music Hall09/23 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Met09/25 – Cleveland, OH @ Hard Rock Rocksino09/27 – Nashville, TN @ The Ryman09/29 – Atlanta, GA @ The Cobb Center10/06 – Rio de Janeiro, BR @ Rock in Rio10/12 – Santiago, CL @ Movistar Arena10/13 – Santiago, CL @ Movistar ArenaView Tour Dates[H/T Billboard]last_img read more

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first_img 10Harvard hosts a two-week Science and Cooking course for Cambridge and Boston students as part of its summer learning series, bringing in top chefs from Boston and Cambridge as well as graduate students and professors from Harvard. Jason Doo (right) assists Kays Laouar, 11, in pulling string cheese into the proper shape. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer On a sunny August day, a group of youngsters from Mission Hill leaned into the fence at a vacant lot and tossed in handmade balls of clay filled with produce seeds.It was a final action project in a food justice initiative at the Mission Hill Summer Program, which is supported by Harvard College students. The initiative brought together camp counselors, gardeners, local chefs, and other community organizations, like the Roxbury Environmental Empowerment Project (REEP), to create a meaningful summer experience for young people.“It’s powerful for kids when they see teens and adults from their own community who are engaged around important issues like bringing healthier food to the neighborhood,” said camp director Jane Wang Williams ’13, who brought the idea of food justice to the camp this summer and fostered partnerships with community members to create the project.The seed bombing was one of the learning moments at 12 Phillips Brooks House Association Summer Urban Program camps peppered across Boston and Cambridge. The camps were coordinated, run, directed, and taught by about 120 college students, offering summer learning and community building activities for 850 children. The camps also employed more than 100 local teens in partnership with the Boston Youth Fund and the Cambridge Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program. (Harvard employed more than 150 local youths this summer.)Even though it was summer, Boston and Cambridge neighborhoods and the campus were alive with Harvard activity. Students, faculty, and staff from the University brought community members and students into classrooms, performing spaces, and parks — extending teaching and learning beyond Harvard Yard in partnership with local organizations and neighborhood schools.On campus, the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) hosted “Kids’ Science and Cooking,” a new program that built upon the popular undergraduate “Science and Cooking” course. Boston and Cambridge students from ages 9 to 12 attended a two-week day summer program, learning from Harvard scientists, mathematicians, and top chefs about pickling, emulsion, fermentation, and more.Kathryn Hollar, director of educational programs at SEAS, said the goal of the program was to “give these kids the tools and empower them to make good decisions, and to teach that science and math is everywhere. We want to show that our scientists are very curious, and want our young people to be curious too.”For the ninth straight year, the Crimson Summer Academy (CSA), a program that helps talented, low-income high school students gain access to top colleges and universities, hosted a class of local sophomores, juniors, and seniors on the Harvard campus. While the average family income of most scholars is $28,000, all 158 program graduates have gone on to college. Some scholars, such as Suryani Dewa Ayu ’15, who graduated from the program in 2010, have gone on to attend Harvard.“CSA is such a phenomenal program,” Ayu said. “It’s a network of people who really support each other, who are constantly in contact, checking up on you, encouraging you, and seeing how you’re doing. I’m so glad to be here as a mentor, interacting with the kids.”While Crimson Scholars were delving into science, qualitative reasoning, and writing, even pitching their original prose at a poetry slam, nearly 300 local high schoolers were getting an academic boost up the street at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School.The Cambridge Harvard Summer Academy (CHSA) is a free summer school, a partnership between the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) and the Cambridge Public Schools, where students work closely with teachers-in-training and veteran teachers as they prepare classwork and get ahead for the next school year.In Allston, the Harvard Allston Education Portal offered mentoring in science, math, and writing to Allston-Brighton children and youth for the fifth consecutive summer. In addition, community outreach and programming for the Harvard Allston Farmers’ Market and the Ed Portal Annex healthy eating series continued, with participation from Harvard Medical School and Harvard College undergraduates.Deeper into Boston, the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University invited local citizens to participate in “tree mobs,” which are 20-minute, in-depth information sessions about individual trees in the arboretum. “It’s about getting back to learning about the biology of plants in a fun way,” said Arboretum Director William (Ned) Friedman. “This is about meeting an organism — to be in a spot and open people’s eyes to an aspect of the collection they may have never noticed before.”“From college prep courses to continuing education, community partnerships to summer jobs, Harvard offers a broad range of opportunities to local residents during the summer,” said Christine Heenan, vice president for Harvard Public Affairs & Communications. “Over three short months, thousands of people of all ages came together to learn, explore, and build community, making the summer a little livelier on campus and strengthening our ties with our neighbors.”— Jennifer Doody contributed to this story. 5Michelle Li (left) and Daleena Gebrehiwet walk to a vacant lot in Mission Hill, carefully balancing and counting their handmade seed bombs. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 17Wilson Recio of Dorchester studies yeast fermentation reaction under East Boston teacher Amanda Dillingham’s supervision as part of Cambridge Harvard Summer Academy (CHSA) programming. The CHSA’s free summer school, hosted at the Cambridge Rindge & Latin School, is a collaboration between the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Cambridge Public Schools. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Kurt Chadderton of the Health Careers Academy gives “snaps” to fellow Crimson Scholars performing at the poetry slam. Photo by Dominick ReuterBoston and Cambridge teenagers celebrate the end of a fruitful summer working at Harvard. Harvard programs, departments, and Schools employed more than 150 local teens this summer. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Peter Del Tredici, a senior research scientist and lecturer in landscape architecture, leads a “tree mob” in exploring different varieties of Stewartia at the Arnold Arboretum. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Eric Lin and Timmy Chen of CHAD do the sack race with gusto at the Harvard University Phillips Brooks House Midsummer Celebration hosted by Harvard undergraduates was held in Stony Brook Park in Jamaica Plain. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 15At Harvard’s 37th Annual Senior Picnic, local senior citizens enjoy lunch, relax, and connect with acquaintances new and old under a canopy of trees in Tercentenary Theatre. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 12Inez Khan (in turquoise) of Cambridge Rindge & Latin School reads a poem in front of fellow Boston and Cambridge high schoolers. The students are all scholars at Harvard’s Crimson Summer Academy, and intensive summer program that helps promising students prepare for success in college and beyond, Photo by Dominick Reuter 16Allston-Brighton residents try their hand at educational mini-golf in the Harvard Allston Education Portal’s new annex. The Ed Portal offers mentoring in science, math, and writing, as well as community programming and activities year-round. Vinay Devadanam/Harvard Public Affairs & Communicationscenter_img 14At Harvard’s 37th Annual Senior Picnic, local senior citizens enjoy lunch, relax, and connect with acquaintances new and old under a canopy of trees in Tercentenary Theatre. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 11Students (from left) Rith Shiferaw, 9, Peter Murphy, 9, and Chkloe Rosen, 17, sit in a science and cooking lab at Harvard Listening to Somerville cheesemaker Lourdes Fiore Smith describe how to make string cheese. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Peter Del Tredici, a senior research scientist and lecturer in landscape architecture, discusses different varieties of Stewartia at the Arnold Arboretum tree mob. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 6As a final project, Michelle Li and Devante Sealy (front) ambush a vacant lot in Mission Hill with clay bombs filled with produce seeds. Harvard student Jane Wang Williams `13 (left) brought the idea of food justice to the camp and fostered community partnerships, including one with the Roxbury Environmental Empowerment Project. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 4Michelle Li, a student in the food justice initiative at PBHA’s Mission Hill Summer Program, points to her final action project — making seed bombs, balls of clay filled with produce seeds. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 7The 40th annual Harvard Summer Pops Band practices at Sanders Theatre. One of the first open community bands in the area, it continues to attract local music lovers of all ages. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 3Harvard student Anthony Palillo (center) joins in the Zuumba dancing fun at the PBHA Midsummer Celebration. Each collective step was clocked with a pedometer and added to Boston Moves for Health’s Million Pound Challenge, Mayor Thomas Menino’s campaign to improve health and Fitness in Boston. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 2High school assistant teachers Aadreem Smith (left) and Willie Hobson showcase their dancing talents at the PBHA Midsummer Celebration. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img
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first_imgIt is well known that a healthy lifestyle — not smoking, avoiding excess weight, and getting regular exercise — can reduce the risk of heart disease. But what about people who have inherited gene variants known to increase risk?A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has found that, even among those at high genetic risk, leading a healthy lifestyle can cut in half the probability of a heart attack or similar event. The report received early online publication in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with a presentation at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions.“The basic message of our study is that DNA is not destiny,” said senior author Sekar Kathiresan, director of the Center for Human Genetic Research at MGH and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). “Many individuals — both physicians and members of the general public — have looked on genetic risk as unavoidable, but for heart attack that does not appear to be the case.”The multi-institutional research team analyzed genetic and clinical data from more than 55,000 participants in four large-scale studies. Three of these — the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Women’s Genome Health Study, and the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study — are prospective studies that have followed participants for up to 20 years. The fourth, the BioImage Study, assessed a variety of risk factors, including the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries when participants joined the initiative.Each participant in the current analysis was assigned a genetic risk score, based on whether they carried any of 50 gene variants that previous studies had associated with elevated heart attack risk. Based on data gathered when participants entered each study, the investigators used four AHA-defined lifestyle factors — no current smoking; lack of obesity, defined as a body mass index less than 30; physical exercise at least once a week; and a healthy dietary pattern — to determine whether participants had a favorable (three or four healthy factors), intermediate (two), or unfavorable lifestyle score.For participants in the prospective studies, the researchers investigated how each individual’s genetic risk score and lifestyle factors related to the incidence of heart attack, the need for procedures designed to open blocked coronary arteries, or sudden cardiac death. Among participants in the BioImage study, genetic and lifestyle factors were compared to the extent of atherosclerotic disease in the coronary arteries at baseline.Across all three prospective studies, a higher genetic risk score significantly increased the incidence of coronary events — as much as 90 percent in those at highest risk. While known risk factors such as a family history and elevated LDL cholesterol were also associated with an elevated genetic risk score, genetic risk was the most powerful contributor to cardiac risk. Each healthy lifestyle factor reduced risk. The unfavorable lifestyle group also had higher levels of hypertension, diabetes, and other known risk factors upon entering the studies.Within each risk category, the presence of lifestyle factors significantly altered the risk of coronary events to such an extent that following a favorable lifestyle could reduce the incidence of coronary events by 50 percent in those with the highest genetic risk scores. Among participants in the BioImage study, both genetic and lifestyle factors were independently associated with levels of calcium-containing plaque in the coronary arteries, and healthy lifestyle factors were associated with less extensive plaque within each genetic risk group.“Some people may feel they cannot escape a genetically determined risk for heart attack, but our findings indicate that following a healthy lifestyle can powerfully reduce genetic risk,” says Kathiresan.“Now we need to investigate whether specific lifestyle factors have stronger impacts and conduct studies in more diverse populations, since most of the participants in these studies are white.”last_img read more

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first_imgWarren acknowledged in her video that she’s had differences with Biden over the years but said he’d always been respectful of her views and even willing to adopt new policies if the argument is persuasive enough.“When you disagree, he’ll listen — not just listen, but really hear you. And treat you with respect, no matter where you’re coming from,” she said. “And he has shown throughout this campaign that when you come up with new facts or a good argument, he’s not too afraid or too proud to be persuaded.”Soon after Warren dropped out of the race last month, Biden adopted her bankruptcy plan. It was a sign of goodwill in a dispute between the two that dates back to 2005, when Warren, then a Harvard Law School professor, battled the then-Delaware senator, who was opposed to some of the reforms that she was advocating.Warren said Biden mentioned the fight when he swore her into the Senate, telling her: “You gave me hell! And you’re gonna do a great job.”That, she said, is “the thing about Joe: he wants you in the fight with him. And when you’re in the fight with Joe at your side, you know you have a partner who’s committed to getting something good done for this country.”Senators Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, and Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters, both of Wisconsin, also endorsed Biden Wednesday.Topics : Elizabeth Warren endorsed Joe Biden on Wednesday, becoming the final major former 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful to back the party’s presumptive nominee.“He knows that a government run with integrity, competence and heart will save lives and save livelihoods,” the Massachusetts senator said in an endorsement video. “And we can’t afford to let Donald Trump continue to endanger the lives and livelihoods of every American.”After Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Warren was considered the most progressive of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates. Her announcement came the same week the Biden campaign rolled out two other big-ticket endorsements: Sanders and former President Barack Obama.last_img read more

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first_imgFacebook Log in with your social account Critics have predicted Indonesia will see a surge in people downgrading their national health insurance (JKN) plan following a decision by the government to increase premiums, saying it will hinder access to health care for lower class policyholders.The higher premiums, stipulated in the latest presidential regulation issued roughly two months after the Supreme Court annulled an earlier regulation on premium increases, will come into effect in July.The first-class service premiums will increase from Rp 80,000 (US$5.30) to Rp 150,000 per person per month, and second-class service premiums will increase from Rp 51,000 to Rp 110,000 under the new scheme to reduce the deficit of the Healthcare and Social Security Agency (BPJS Kesehatan), which manages the JKN.The premium for the third-class service will increase by a smaller amount, from Rp 25,500 to Rp 42,000, and the government… Google Topics : #BPJS-premium-increase BPJS-Kesehatan JKN-premium-increase JKN #health health health-insurance Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ?last_img read more

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first_imgAdvertisement David Luiz was badly at fault for Southampton’s opening goal against Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Tony Adams was left dumbfounded by the standard of Arsenal’s defending after Southampton took an early lead at the Emirates.Unai Emery’s side were without a win in five matches and his confidence-starved team got off the worst possible start against struggling Southampton when Danny Ings fired the visitors ahead after only eight minutes.Arsenal’s entire defensive line switched off and failed to notice Nathan Redmond taking a quick free-kick which allowed Ings the chance to run in on goal and beat Bernd Leno with a precise finish.David Luiz was particularly culpable given he was looking back at his own goal with Redmond already having released Southampton’s lone forward, much to Adams’ astonishment.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘They’re all sleeping look at Luiz here,’ he said in his role as a pundit for BT Sport. ‘What is Luiz doing? He’s just standing there.”I can’t tell which team is down the bottom..”Tony Adams isn’t impressed by Arsenal’s inability to defend as they concede to struggling Southampton.#BTSportScore pic.twitter.com/cgkFf8NjWK— BT Sport Score (@btsportscore) November 23, 2019 ‘We’ve got fantastic finishers but the other end is shocking,’ added Adams. ‘We need something sorted defensively very quickly.’ Advertisement MORE: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang sends message to Arsenal fans over Granit XhakaMORE: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang finally breaks silence on being named Arsenal captain Former Arsenal captain Tony Adams stunned by awful David Luiz defending Comment Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 23 Nov 2019 3:37 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link214Shares ‘They’ve tried to play out from the back creating their own problems and they’re not into this game at all hopefully they might get a reaction.’Arsenal did manage an equaliser 10 minutes later when Kieran Tierney’s cross located Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang in the penalty area and when the new club captain’s effort was blocked by Ryan Bertrand, Alexander Lacazette was on hand to pounce on the rebound.last_img read more

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