September 27, 2021
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first_img Rice University student Joshua Fleck gets ready to play a mechatronic-enhanced video game at the Moody Center for the Arts. (Credit: Brandon Martin/Rice University) Rice University students — from left, Liz Kacpura, Noah Kenner and Caz Smith – demonstrate their Ro Sham Bot, a rock-paper-scissors robot, at an exhibition by engineering students of mechatronic art at Rice’s Moody Center for the Arts. (Credit: Donald Soward/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University students — from left, Liz Kacpura, Noah Kenner and Caz Smith – demonstrate their Ro Sham Bot, a rock-paper-scissors robot, at an exhibition by engineering students of mechatronic art at Rice’s Moody Center for the Arts. Photo by Donald Soward“The class culminates with this project, and this year I wanted to do the theme of interactive art,” she said. “They’re all asked to do some kind of mechatronic system that must have mechanical design, sensing and actuation or some kind of action. It might not be motion, but it might be light or sound. And it has to incorporate the control system, the algorithms that decide what to do with the sensor input and how to act.”More than a dozen projects filled the gallery with light, music and mechanical sounds, but none as loud as the delighted chatter of students playing with each other’s completed creations for the first time.Musical interpretations included a light-triggered guitar, a proximity-triggered ukulele and a unique theremin. A camera-enabled box read facial expressions and played music to match the user’s mood. There were several puzzles, a mechanical flower that would grow, bloom and sleep in response to its environment, and a ball-button enabled screen that let one make and pop bubbles endlessly.“It’s very satisfying,” creator Amelia Brumwell told the crowd during her presentation.In one corner, a mechanical hand engaged all comers in a challenging round of rock-paper-scissors. Rice University Professor Marcia O’Malley captures Andrew Low, center, and Eric Voigt with their digital theramin at an exhibition of mechatronic art at Rice’s Moody Center for the Arts. (Credit: Brandon Martin/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Rice University Professor Marcia O’Malley captures Andrew Low, center, and Eric Voigt with their digital theramin at an exhibition of mechatronic art at Rice’s Moody Center for the Arts. (Credit: Brandon Martin/Rice University) https://youtu.be/67IBin1eYLUVideo produced by Brandon Martin/Rice UniversityRelated materials:Mechatronics and Haptic Interfaces Lab (O’Malley lab): https://mahilab.rice.eduDepartment of Mechanical Engineering: https://mech.rice.eduGeorge R. Brown School of Engineering: https://engineering.rice.eduImages for download: Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University student Joshua Fleck gets ready to play a mechatronic-enhanced video game at the Moody Center for the Arts. Photo by Brandon Martin-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Video: Rice University students — from left, Liz Kacpura, Noah Kenner and Caz Smith – demonstrate their Ro Sham Bot, a rock-paper-scissors robot, at an exhibition by engineering students of mechatronic art at Rice’s Moody Center for the Arts. (Credit: Donald Soward/Rice University) Return to article. Long Descriptionlast_img

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