April 12, 2021
  • 7:42 am The Groove Orient Share Spring Tour Dates Including Fools Paradise Throwdown
  • 7:41 am GRiZ Announced As Headliner On Northern Nights Music Festival Lineup
  • 7:36 am Dead & Company Debuts ‘Box Of Rain’ At Rockin’ Cincinnati Show [Full Audio/Video]
  • 7:36 am Club Venues In Many Major Cities Added To Ticketmaster’s Voucher Redemption Program
  • 7:33 am Lettuce LOCKN’ Set And ‘Let Us Play’ Documentary To Be Broadcast Tonight On Qello

first_imgAbout one year ago, brothers Chris and Will Salvi and brothers Matt and Jack Berg began working on their athletic development website, liftedathletics.com. The website was designed to give athletes advice on nutrition, workouts and overall health and fitness. Chris Salvi and Matt Berg are both in their junior year at Notre Dame. Will Salvi, who also attends Notre Dame, and Jack Berg, who attends University of Illinois, are sophomores. All of the boys are from a suburb of Chicago and have been friends since their youth. In high school, the boys were heavily involved in sports and worked out at the same gym. They picked up many tips throughout the years and wanted to share this advice with others. “We’re both into health and fitness and we wanted to put that information out there for people to find and not have to search around a bunch of sites,” Chris said about himself and Matt. In the nutrition section, the website contains information such as what foods do certain things for your body and recommended foods and supplements for before and after working out. “Say you’re an athlete and you want to know what protein to buy, we have a section that recommends protein,” Matt said. “We can tell you what not to waste your money on.”  The site contains a weight lifting guide, which has videos and picture descriptions that shows how to properly lift and exercise, as well as specific workouts for different parts of the body. Matt Berg, who played football as a freshman for another college, and Chris Salvi, who plays for Notre Dame, said although some of the workout guide they found through research, most comes from their personal experience. “A lot of things from football we implement into helpful things for the site,” Chris Salvi said. “And I definitely use a lot of information from it. If I feel it should be put on then I find it beneficial also.” Although their main personal experiences have involved the game of football, lifeandathletics.com also has sections dedicated to other sports such as baseball and basketball. “We get a lot of information from other athletes as well,” Matt Berg said. “We’ll talk to track runners, baseball players, and we’ll see what works for them.” Another major part of the site is supplement distribution. The boys are associates for network marketing companies and sell products such as multivitamins, optimizers and meal replacements. One company, Asea, has a brand new product that is supposed to help a person’s immune system to function on all cylinders, helps with recovery, and lowers the heart rate. “We’re looking to increase our distribution of supplements,” Chris Salvi said. “We have a good flow right now of giving out and selling to people.” Although there is already a wealth of information on the site, it is still developing, Chris Salvi said. “It’s a work in progress,” Chris Salvi said about lifeandathletics.com. “It’s constantly being updated, we work on it pretty much every day.” Matt Berg said the boys have mainly used the Internet for exposure so far but the response they have received has been positive. “We’ve only had an increase in hits,” Chris Salvi said. “There’s been a constant growth every month since we started.” That growth comes in part from non-athletes, Matt Berg said. He believe the website has a wide range of fitness and nutritional information that can be used by anyone. “Basically, anyone who’s into fitness,” Matt Berg said, “you should come here.”last_img read more

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first_imgA rising number of influenza cases in the South Bend area has prompted Notre Dame Health Services to prepare for a spike in the number of visits Notre Dame students make to St. Liam’s Hall in the next few weeks. Mary Ellen McCaslin, assistant director of clinical services, said Health Services has noticed the appearance of influenza strains on campus over the last two weeks. “We do what is called a QuickFlu Test and we have had some positives in the last few weeks,” McCaslin said. “We expect to follow the trends seen in surrounding regions, which indicate a rise in the incidences of influenza cases.” Despite the expected escalation of flu cases, McCaslin said Notre Dame is in a much better position than last year. “The H1N1 Swine Flu that we saw last year is not showing itself this year. It caused a bit of a panic in the college health sector and the public as well,” she said. “People were nervous, but that outbreak was certainly not what was predicted.” McCaslin said she predicts H1N1 will remain absent, though a mutation might reveal itself at some point. “We were just reviewing information from the CDC website today and saw that the H1N1 has mutated into what the CDC is now calling H3N9 or N3 right now,” she said. “That’s the kind of flu we expect to see.” Though mutations occur, telltale signs of the flu are the same as always, she said. Students should be on the lookout for fevers, sore throats, headaches, chills and fatigue. Once detected, the usual course of action may be taken to expedite the duration of the illness, though there is no instant cure for the flu. “This is a self-limiting illness that will run its course as all viruses do,” McCaslin said. “They are not effectively treated by antibiotics because it is not a bacteria, it is a virus.” McCaslin said treatment — except in extreme situations — is generally the same. Rest and fluids, accompanied by Tylenol or Ibuprofen to control the fever allow the illness to run its course. A new product on the market, Tamiflu, is rumored to accelerate recovery, though McCaslin said it is not markedly better than traditional treatment methods. “The effectiveness of Tamiflu if pretty limited,” she said. “All it does is reduce the duration of the illness by one to three days.” Other parts of Indiana have demonstrated surges in illness and virus activity, said McCaslin, demonstrating a development in this year’s flu season. In anticipation of the next few weeks, McCaslin said Health Services encourages students to practice flu prevention with good hygiene. “The best thing that anyone can do is to sneeze and cough into your elbow and not into your hands. Alcohol-based hand rubs are a great way to keep germs under control, but washing your hands vigorously with soap and water is still the best way to reduce germs,” she said. “Stay away from people who are sick if possible, and use common sense.”last_img read more

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first_imgStateside football fans may not have traveled across the pond to see the football team take on the Midshipmen this weekend, but they still plan to celebrate the Emerald Isle Classic with Irish gusto. While many students may elect to hold conventional game watches in their dorm rooms, common areas, apartments or houses, some will begin celebrating the night before the 9 a.m. kickoff. Senior Emily Hefferon said she and her friends plan to have a sleepover at her off-campus house and start the morning off with coffee and breakfast. “That way, no one has to wake up at 8:30 and drive,” she said. “We’ll all just be here.” Hefferon said the football season opener’s overseas location has both pros and cons. “I’m sad that [the game] is not here, but it’s so cool that we have a game in Dublin,” she said. “I’m just really excited about that. It would be much more disappointing if the first game were in Oklahoma or something.” Senior Dave Lawson said the game’s location holds a special significance for him. “I studied in Dublin last summer as part of the first summer program to go there from Notre Dame, so I’m going to have some of my Dublin friends over to watch the game,” he said. While he reminisces about his semester in Ireland, Lawson said he decided to use the special circumstances of the game to promote Southern Tide, an apparel company for which he serves as campus ambassador. On gameday, Lawson said he plans to hold a private Southern Tide event at his off-campus home as well as visit some residence halls on campus throughout the day. “As a college ambassador, you want to maintain the integrity of Southern Tide as a brand name by sharing it and sharing ideas with other students who are unfamiliar with the brand name,” he said. “That said, tailgating and pregames for football games would be a great way to promote brand awareness for Southern Tide.” Notre Dame’s storied football tradition also creates a good environment for spreading the word about Southern Tide through product giveaways and raffles, Lawson said. “With a huge football program comes a lot of spectators, and the Navy-Notre Dame rivalry is a classic one,” he said. “It’s the first game of the season, so I thought it would be an ideal opportunity to explain to people what Southern Tide is.” Students and members of the South Bend community will also be able to celebrate in local pubs and restaurants like O’Rourke’s Public House. O’Rourke’s manager Andrew Pankowski said his pub has been planning its Saturday morning “Kegs and Eggs” event for the past three months. “We knew this was going to be a big deal for a long time now, especially with everything going on with the game in Ireland and with the rivalry with Navy,” he said. The pub will open before kickoff at 8 a.m. with an all-you-can-eat breakfast buffet featuring deep-fried pigs in a blanket, assorted breakfast food items and drink specials, Pankowski said.   Pankowski said business at O’Rourke’s fluctuates based on the relative success of the Irish football team. “Our entire year pretty much rotates around football season,” he said. “It’s our bread and butter and it’s what really pays the bills. Last year was really on and off during away games, so it really depends on what kind of season we’re having. If [the team is] doing really well, we have more people, especially towards the beginning of the year.” O’Rourke’s also recently began a partnership with the Notre Dame Athletic Department, so it now serves as an official gamewatch location for all Notre Dame away games, Pankowski said. But win or lose, O’Rourke’s always provides a lively environment for a gamewatch for Irish fans, Pankowski said. “We did some remodeling over the summer … that makes it family friendly for all ages, so you can be in here even if you’re not 21,” he said. “We’ll be celebrating all day just like any other football weekend. It’s usually a party here no matter how many people turn up for it.”last_img read more

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first_imgStarting at noon today and continuing for the next 24 hours, Notre Dame students will cycle for a worthy cause in the Pink Zone Spin-A-Thon. The Spin-A-Thon, now in its second year at Notre Dame, is part of a larger, nationwide cancer-fighting initiative called the Pink Zone. It is sponsored by RecSports, the women’s basketball team and the College of Science. “The Pink Zone is a nationwide NCAA women’s basketball team fundraising initiative specifically for breast cancer research,” said Jennie Phillips, assistant director of fitness and fitness facilities for RecSports. The Spin-A-Thon started when the Pink Zone team reached out to Phillips and RecSports. “Last year, [the Pink Zone planning committee] said, ‘why don’t we have a spin-a-thon on campus so our students can be involved?’” said Phillips. “The natural thought was that RecSports should oversee it because we have a cycling studio and we know how to program, and so last year we started with our first one and it was very successful.” Last year, the RecSports Spin-A-Thon raised $13,000, Gallagher said. The Pink Zone initiative as a whole raised $200,000. This year’s goal is to raise at least $15,000, according to the College of Science website. Phillips said teaming up with the College of Science was a natural choice. “They do a lot of research on different kinds of cancers and Dean Greg Crawford [of the College of Science] is very passionate about doing research and helping find a cure for breast cancer,” Phillips said. “I think when you have the College of Science involved, it adds credibility to the research we’re talking about … It’s what’s happening at Notre Dame, which I think is really great.” The College of Science oversees another Spin-A-Thon at nearby Knollwood Country Club in Granger. Kristen Gallagher, fitness and instructional program coordinator at RecSports, said although Knollwood’s Spin-A-Thon inspired Notre Dame’s in some ways, the on-campus Spin-A-Thon is unique. “It’s really nice to work together with [Knollwood] because they did it first and they gave us some ideas of what we could do for ours, but it’s just way different doing it for students,” Gallagher said. Gallagher said the event will feature food, giveaways and a raffle for a pink cruiser bike. “It’s a 24 hour event, and we break each hour up into a different theme,” she said. Themes include an Ugly Christmas Sweater hour, Mustache Bash hour, and a Go USA hour, during which the film “Miracle will be shown. In addition to the hourly themes, several student clubs, including the Steppers, the Humor Artists and the Juggling Club, have volunteered their talents to entertain participants. Phillips said the best part of participating in the Spin-A-Thon is the real difference it makes in people’s lives. “I think that doing something this simple can have such a huge impact, and I’m always impressed with the effort that the Notre Dame community makes when there’s a cause involved,” Phillips said. Gallagher agreed. “This is a special cause,” she said. “It’s very near and dear to people’s hearts.” To register for the Pink Zone Spin-A-Thon, visit recsports.nd.edu.last_img read more

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first_imgCampus was buzzing this past weekend with a new type of excitement: prospective students. Spring Visitation weekend, an annual event held for minority students, drew hundreds of potential future undergraduates to campus for a weekend of exposure to life at Notre Dame. “The weekend is filled with activities, meeting alumni, current students, going to see club shows, sports games, trying the food, etc.,” freshman Jasmine Moxley said. “When you leave, you’re exhausted, but still wishing the trip was longer. And, you are convinced that you want to come join the Notre Dame family.” Moxley, who attended Spring Visitation last year, said she wanted to reciprocate and volunteered to host a prospective student. She said the four-day, three-night stay convinced her to attend Notre Dame. “I think Notre Dame is doing a fantastic job right now welcoming prospective students,” she said. “When I was a prospective student, the minute I stepped on campus I felt welcomes and really comfortable here and the events during the weekend just enhanced those feelings.” Moxley said her prospective student shared the same feelings. Junior Briana Cortez also chose to host a prospective student after having a positive experience attending Spring Visitation as a high school senior. “Before I came on Spring Visitation weekend, I was not considering Notre Dame as an option,” Cortez said. “After I visited the campus and saw how beautiful it was, how great the people were and the opportunities I could have I realized this was the place for me. I hosted a student because I wanted to show my prospective student how great the campus was like my host showed me.” Moxley said prospective students are eager to get a feel for everything from the academic life and opportunities to the social scene and dining hall food. “The coordinators make sure to expose the prospective students to the best things Notre Dame has to offer academically, socially, physically and spiritually,” she said. Moxley said prospective students also worried about the ratio of minority students at the University and how that would affect them if they go here. The trip successfully demonstrates how those in that category can excel on this campus, she said. In the end, the potential students are most interested in learning about what their lives would be like if they chose to attend Notre Dame, Cortez said. “There were so many things that they wanted to know, from serious things like how the classes were to silly things like how cute the boys are,” she said. “But I think what they asked about the most was what life is like here at Notre Dame and how it is unique from other campuses.” Cortez said Spring Visitation serves prospective students by letting current students help show them practically everything they need to know in order to make an informed decision about attending Notre Dame. “I feel like it is the students that know the school better than anyone, therefore they can give their firsthand accounts of what they think of Notre Dame,” she said. “Whether they choose Notre Dame or not, they made a fully educated decision with all the cards in their hands.” Cortez said the University plans the Spring Visitation weekends when there are fun events on campus so that students are exposed to the best sides of Notre Dame. “They bring prospective students during great weekends where a lot of cool student activities are happening,” she said. “If only they could bring the students when it was a little warmer, I’m sure a lot more people from California and other warmer states would come.” By covering all costs of the trip, Moxley said Notre Dame optimizes the chances of attracting high school students to attend Spring Visitation to experience the wealth of opportunities Notre Dame can offer them. “Notre Dame pays for the plane ride here if you are traveling from far away, they provide a card to swipe into the dining hall and they provide bus transportation to any events held off campus,” she said. “You don’t have to pay for a thing while you’re visiting, which is really nice and definitely makes the trip more enjoyable.”last_img read more

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first_imgEndorse.me, a technology startup created by two 2011 Notre Dame graduates, provides employers with confidential information about potential employees, offering an advantage to students in strengthening their candidacy and to employers in hiring the very best talent before their competitors. James Ingallinera and Trey Griffith piloted the idea in spring 2012 and introduced approximately 2,000 students to it in its initial stages. Today, Endorse.me is available on 18 college campuses, including Notre Dame. “We are the platform for this confidential information that is invaluable for recruiters in helping them find the best candidates and for students in dramatically strengthening their candidacy, that can’t be on LinkedIn,” Ingallinera, CEO of Endorse.me, said. “It’s a big market opportunity that’s been overlooked and bucks the trend of information becoming more social and open in the online professional space today.” Ingallinera said the startup raised $300,000 in May 2012 from angel investors and continued to test different applications for the software to discover where the greatest demand was located. “Ultimately, there was the most demand in the online professional space, specifically within campus recruiting, and we focused our efforts on that,” he said. TechCrunch, a media property dedicated to profiling startups, described Endorse.me as, “a secure, online platform through which [students] can share confidential information with prospective employers, and, in turn, give companies a better way to identify and hire top collegiate talent.” Freshman Anna Gebhardt began working as the Notre Dame Campus Liaison in mid-February “Once I heard of the opportunity to work for a startup where I would be able to have a real impact and say in key decisions, I was eager to apply and stand out among the other candidates,” she said. Gebhardt said they are targeting college students at the top universities and colleges who are interested in working in today’s most competitive industries: technology and finance. “We are expecting students to adopt the idea as more useful way of sharing necessary information that recruiters may not be able to access without Endorse.me,” Ingallinera said. “The goal is to have students providing the link on their resume, during interviews, on LinkedIn and all throughout the recruiting process.” In the long term, Ingallinera said the company wants to expand beyond campus recruiting to the rest of the workforce until Endorse.me is something that is used in every hiring decision for the broader job market. “We’re especially interested in students who are currently juniors and will be entering internship programs on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley for this summer,” Ingallinera said. Students interested in joining the Endorse.me team can contact Ingallinera at [email protected],Endorse.me, a technology startup created by two 2011 Notre Dame graduates, provides employers with confidential information about potential employees, offering an advantage to students in strengthening their candidacy and to employers in hiring the very best talent before their competitors. James Ingallinera and Trey Griffith piloted the idea in spring 2012 and introduced approximately 2,000 students to it in its initial stages. Today, Endorse.me is available on 18 college campuses, including Notre Dame. “We are the platform for this confidential information that is invaluable for recruiters in helping them find the best candidates and for students in dramatically strengthening their candidacy, that can’t be on LinkedIn,” Ingallinera, CEO of Endorse.me, said. “It’s a big market opportunity that’s been overlooked and bucks the trend of information becoming more social and open in the online professional space today.” Ingallinera said the startup raised $300,000 in May 2012 from angel investors and continued to test different applications for the software to discover where the greatest demand was located. “Ultimately, there was the most demand in the online professional space, specifically within campus recruiting, and we focused our efforts on that,” he said. TechCrunch, a media property dedicated to profiling startups, described Endorse.me as, “a secure, online platform through which [students] can share confidential information with prospective employers, and, in turn, give companies a better way to identify and hire top collegiate talent.” Freshman Anna Gebhardt began working as the Notre Dame Campus Liaison in mid-February. “Once I heard of the opportunity to work for a startup where I would be able to have a real impact and say in key decisions, I was eager to apply and stand out among the other candidates,” she said. Gebhardt said they are targeting college students at the top universities and colleges who are interested in working in today’s most competitive industries: technology and finance. “We are expecting students to adopt the idea as more useful way of sharing necessary information that recruiters may not be able to access without Endorse.me,” Ingallinera said. “The goal is to have students providing the link on their resume, during interviews, on LinkedIn and all throughout the recruiting process.” In the long term, Ingallinera said the company wants to expand beyond campus recruiting to the rest of the workforce until Endorse.me is something that is used in every hiring decision for the broader job market. “We’re especially interested in students who are currently juniors and will be entering internship programs on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley for this summer,” Ingallinera said. Students interested in joining the Endorse.me team can contact Ingallinera at [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgWei Lin | The Observer McKenna Schuster (left), Sam Moorhead, Lauren Vidal and Matthew Devine worked to enhance community on their respective campuses through the 29 for 29 program at Notre Dame and the SMC card initiative.As their tenure came to a close March 31, outgoing student body president and vice president Lauren Vidal and Matthew Devine reflected on their year in office, sharing in hindsight the issues that proved to be their greatest triumphs and challenges.In particular, the two said, they took pride in the wide range of programming and initiatives they took on to respond to the diverse opinions and needs of the student body.“We’ve been able to meet so many people and to learn many perspectives and stories through all the different things that we’ve done this year,” Devine said.HighlightsIn particular, Vidal said this administration tried to focus on community, both on campus and in the greater South Bend area, by tackling issues such as the Alma Mater policy after football games and the 29 for 29 program, which paired residence halls with needy families from the South Bend community.“At the beginning of the year, we sat down with the Football Unity Council and looked at the Alma Mater policy and why it was eliminated after home games and then discussed all the concerns in a very honest conversation,” Vidal said. “Going forward, we essentially assured that we would be promoting a supportive environment in the stands.”The Football Unity Council will continue to address the Alma Mater policy annually.Devine said he and Vidal hope the 29 for 29 initiative would go beyond the holiday season and become a permanent fixture on campus. As of right now, a student government focus group has been assembled to review the program, and Vidal estimated that 10 to 15 residence halls are still actively engaging with their assigned families.“[29 for 29] was a really organic effort to bridge our understanding of how students see the South Bend area but also at the same time develop really strong relationships with needy families around the area and to bring them to campus to be honorary members of the dorms,” Devine said. “The goal was to enrich students’ understanding of South Bend, but also to develop those personal connections.”ChallengesVidal said throughout the process of working with the Worker Participation Committee — which addressed the University’s “China Policy” — she and Devine struggled to connect the feelings of the student body with the University’s administration.“We really tried to engage the campus, really giving it my all,” she said. “ … We did get some pushback after the fact; students were discouraged by the fact that they thought that they didn’t have enough of a forum for conversation or input. We understand that a gap between students and the [University] administration has always been present.“That’s something that every [student government] administration has struggled with, trying to bring the two together. What we’ve learned is that the [University] administration is extremely open to speaking with the students at all times.“I think there’s work to be done building that communication. … It’s just something to maintain and keep healthy.”Moving ForwardAlthough the two are free from nearly all their student government obligations for the rest of the year, they have several lingering commitments, including their Board of Trustees Report and Communiversity Day. Additionally, Vidal will chair the Campus Life Council for the remainder of the academic year.Looking forward to next year, Devine predicted several key issues would remain at the forefront of the minds of students and community members.“One of the big conversations we’ve had is surrounding campus safety, but also with students moving off campus and the considerations they have for campus safety and out in the community as well,” Devine said.“Something that I think will come up a lot next year — and has begun at the end of this year — are students of different socioeconomic backgrounds as well as undocumented students. That’s something that’s been publicized more recently, but I think that will continue to be something the university talks about.”‘An extreme privilege’Of the team’s year in office, Vidal said she was grateful for the ability to speak with and learn from so many of her fellow students.“This has been an extreme privilege,” Vidal said. “Matt and I have really been given a unique opportunity to have input on behalf of our peers and on how the University is moving forward, and we’ve seen that as a great honor. We haven’t taken one day for granted … we’ve really tried to give it our all, every day. … We’ve learned, truly, what a special place this is.”Tags: Lauren Vidal, Matt Devine, Student government, Vidal + Devinelast_img read more

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first_imgThe Experience Project intends to shed light on religious and transformative experiences and their respective effects on people’s lives. The project is supported by a $5.1 million grant, co-directed by Notre Dame professors of philosophy Michael Rea and Samuel Newlands, as well as professor of philosophy Laurie Ann Paul of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and awarded $1.7 million to 22 research projects in order to explore the long-held questions of these experiences.“The psychology and sociology that we’re funding is all focusing on the concept of transformative experiences,” Rea said.  “Transformative experiences, in the sense that we’re interested in, are ones where you have no real access to what it’s like to have the experience or really what its value or disvalue might be to you until you have the experience.“ … So what the psychologists and sociologists are exploring is, ‘What are some experiences that are transformative in this way? How do people make decisions about them? What kind of transformations are brought on by them?’”Rea referred to an argument of his colleague, Paul, to illustrate one type of this experience.“She’s argued that no amount of just being told what it’s like to have a kid … no amount of research of the topic is really going to tell you what the value or disvalue of that experience will be for you, or really what it would be like for you in particular to have a child, because it’s such an impactful event in your life. She thinks that there’s no way, really, to kind of make rational decisions whether to undertake this.”According to a University press release, the Experience Project is funding a non-residential project called “Receptivity of God through Ritual,” by Terence Cuneo, a professor of philosophy at the University of Vermont.“He’s exploring religious experience in liturgy,” Rea said. “ … sort of talking about the way in which the liturgies of the church help to kind of cultivate a sort of sense of the presence of God, a capacity for experiencing God, experiencing the presence of God, and so on.”Rea hinted at the rarity of this type of research.“We have a whole liturgical studies program here, but there aren’t many people that are doing the philosophy of liturgy,” Rea said. “So that’s one kind of exciting project.” Rea described a funded residential project by a colleague that is exploring the nature and experience of divine forgiveness.“One question he’s asking is what it is to be forgiven, what forgiveness consists in, what kind of standing God has to forgive our sins,” he said. “If I commit a sin against somebody, you couldn’t walk in and forgive me for that unless you’re the somebody I sinned against. So why can God walk in and forgive us for that? So [Cueno] is exploring those issues and also questions about just how it is that we experience God’s forgiveness.”Rea said the project is still in its beginning stages and a lot of research is still in its infancy.“We just had a big collaborative workshop with our scientists last weekend, where we … got summaries of all the psychology and sociology projects that are being done,” Rea said. “Some of the psychologists have actually started taking data already. I mean it’s all the very beginning stages, but they’ve got at least a month’s worth of data now.”Rea said the project will develop in many forms including a book and a lecture series.“My research project, under the auspices of this grant, is a book on divine hiddenness,” Rea said. “I’ve got a third to half of that book drafted. And that’s going to become [the] Gifford Lectures in 2017.“ … Laurie and I are supposed to write an article together on religious experience and transformative experience that … draws on some of those connections.”Tags: Laurie Ann Paul, Michael Rea, Notre Dame, Samuel Newlands, The Experience Projectlast_img read more

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first_imgChris Collins | The Observer Meg Penrose, a professor at Texas A&M and Notre Dame law graduate, reflects on her experiences as a lawyer for people on death row at a lecture in Eck Hall of Law on Wednesday evening.“He’s been on suicide watch for about a month in his cell, and they keep him on camera watch, and they will take him to the place, and I presume he’ll have his last meal and perhaps he’ll have discussions with people close to him, perhaps a spiritual advisor,” Penrose said. “Members of the victim’s family will be driving down, and they’ll witness what they believe to be justice. But law and justice are not certainly the same thing.”Penrose, a Notre Dame Law School graduate, said her client’s — 33-year-old Licho Escamilla — case moved through a number of courts before eventually being tried in the U.S. Supreme Court.“I was literally the last attorney this client was permitted to have,” she said. “My boss called me up and said, ‘Meg, I need you to take this client. He’s fired everyone else before this.’ I said that’s a pretty bad way to start, but I was his last option. He tried to fire me, but I was all he had.”As Penrose’s client’s case moved through the various courts, she said the juries scrupulously looked at the evidence and the previous jury’s decision. “We live in a society defined by laws, and the jury gave a sentence that was looked at several times,” Penrose said. “They actually sought the record, they wanted to actually look at the case.”Penrose said this particular case caused her to continue discussing her ongoing personal conflict regarding the death penalty.“I’m at a point in my career where I’m conflicted,” she said. “I don’t understand it from my religious background — I agree with the Pope. I don’t understand it from my moral perspective. But we need to find a just penalty that preserves the human dignity of the person.”Penrose said her mother played a role in her decision to represent people who had committed heinous enough crimes to warrant the death penalty. “I got this from my mother. She didn’t agree with the death penalty,” Penrose said. “She got it from Matthew, the verse ending with ‘for what you do for the least of my brothers, you did for me.’”Penrose said her Notre Dame education shaped her to be a better person. “I’ve learned about service, about serving those who are least deserving of justice, those who are least deserving of my time, my effort, the least deserving and yet, we help them,” she said. “The work is not popular. I would say it’s thankless. Every individual in the United States deserves representation. That’s not necessarily why I took that case. I’m not here to justify the crime, but the crime and the penalty are separate issues.”Penrose also said there are unique opportunities and responsibilities for lawyers, particularly lawyers graduating from Notre Dame.“You’ll learn about other cultures and other people and that will shape who you are, and it will make you a better person,” she said. “You are a part of the Notre Dame family. You are a different kind of lawyer. You are a Notre Dame lawyer. Do something to help someone. Do justice.”Tags: death penalty, death row, justice, lawyer, Notre Dame Law School Two and a half hours after her lecture concluded, one of Meg Penrose’s clients was executed for killing a police officer. “Today is a somber day. It’s a difficult thing to talk about,” she said. “Tonight, as my client is executed, there are many people who will feel vindicated.”Penrose, a professor of law at Texas A&M University and death penalty expert, spoke Wednesday evening at Eck Hall of Law about the moral debate surrounding death row, in a lecture titled “The Death Penalty, Dignity and Doing Justice.”last_img read more

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first_imgCatholic writer Dan Mattson spoke Monday on his struggle to reconcile his sexual identity with his faith. The talk was hosted by Students for Child-Oriented Policy and the “Irish Rover.” The first 30 attendees to the event received free copies of Mattson’s book, “Why I Don’t Call Myself Gay: How I Reclaimed My Sexual Reality and Found Peace.”Mattson is a professional orchestral trombone player, currently performing as the assistant principal trombone at Grand Rapids Symphony. He began his speech by saying that Catholic doctrine on sexuality drew him to the Church.“I am actually somebody, believe it or not, who came into the Catholic Church because of the Church’s teachings on sexuality and homosexuality,” he said. “People like me actually exist. We may be considered an anomaly, but I have come to realize that the Church loves me more than anyone else, and the gift that she gives to me is to constant remind me how beloved I am by God. Part of that is telling me how I’m going to live my life, and to guide me on the path of fulfillment.”The talk was told in the context of Mattson’s own life and journey. He described his upbringing in a family that had left the Catholic Church to become Protestant, and his first discovery of his attraction to other men at the age of six. Despite this and his later addiction to pornography, Mattson said that he loved and trusted in God throughout his childhood and adolescence.“I believed that He wanted me to be happy, in this life or the next, and that His plans to ‘prosper me and not to harm me’ were the plans that I wanted,” he said. “And what were the plans I wanted? I expected and hoped that I would be married and have a wife and family. That was my limited vision of human happiness.”Mattson talked about struggling with the issue of God as a young adult and his investigation of “revisionist gay theology,” and finally his decision to meet and have sex with a man whom he had been talking to online.“I thought I’m finally finding liberty,” he said. “This is true freedom. This is it. But it seemed empty and unfulfilling. I was plucking the forbidden fruit.”After this said, Mattson said he sought out and began a relationship with “a very good man,” whom he dated for about a year.“I’ll be honest, I was happy. No doubt I was happier than I’d been in a long time,” he said. “Many people have a strange notion that if you’re living outside of Church teachings, you’re not going to be happy. I was happy, on a certain level … but where we were wrong was when we were having sex together. We were using each other in that moment. It felt like love, it seemed like love, but it wasn’t. It was mutual use of each other, which is anything we do outside of God’s plan for human sexuality.”He broke off this relationships on good terms with his partner to pursue a long-term relationship with a woman with whom he became “madly in love” with. However, this relationship also ended and left him “devastated.” His godparents, after learning about Mattson’s writings on his sexuality, introduced him the Courage Apostolate, an apostolate of the Catholic Church that counsels individuals with same-sex attractions in living faithfully and chastely. Soon after attending his first Courage Apostolate Mass, he rejoined the Catholic Church and has remained Catholic since.“Society says that the Church is behind the times on human sexuality,” he said. “No, it is the Church that leads us to peace, true happiness, contentment and fulfillment. God never says ‘no’ to us, unless he loves us.”Tags: Catholic church, sexuality, Students for a Child Oriented Policylast_img read more

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