September 20, 2021
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first_imgCARDIFF, UNITED KINGDOM – MARCH 17: Joe Worsley of England leaves the field early in the first half with concussion during the RBS Six Nations Championship match between Wales and England at the Millennium Stadium on March 17, 2007 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Famous head knocks: Brian O’Driscoll during the 2010 Six NationsThe International Rugby Board has approved a revised set of protocols governing concussion, but has rejected the much-supported plan for a Concussion Bin at the top end of the game.An amendment to Regulation 10, approved by the IRB Council at its Special Meeting of Council in Dublin, has paved the way for a new robust set of guidelines surrounding concussion that will enhance the protection of players at all levels of the Game.Ashton took a huge knock to the head during the Autumn International against South AfricaPlayers, coaches, medics and administrators now have access to an easy-to-use dedicated set of guidelines that cater for the elite and community levels and recognise that medical diagnosis and support is not always available to players at every level of the game. Importantly, greater clarity and flexibility will aid the process.Grounded in extensive research to increase understanding, the new guidelines are now available at the IRB’s dedicated Player Welfare website www.irbplayerwelfare.com. Underpinning the programme will be the roll out of a Game wide education programme that highlights the dangers of ignoring the symptoms of concussion.CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE NEW GUIDELINESIRB Chairman Bernard Lapasset said: “The safety and welfare of players is of paramount concern to the IRB and its Member Unions. At the inaugural IRB Medical Conference we identified concussion as a key priority for the game. These new guidelines are the culmination of a process that has seen collaboration with medical experts within our Unions and consultation with independent experts.” “We all have a duty of care to our players and these new guidelines will deliver a more appropriate process of concussion identification and management for players at all levels of the game. This is a very exciting development for the Game.”“Education is key. Collectively we have a responsibility to ensure that players, coaches and administrators are fully educated on the dangers of concussion. A robust education programme is essential to ensure risks are not taken and concussion is appropriately managed by players and coaches.”Founded on the internationally accepted Zurich Consensus document of which the IRB was a contributor, the new guidelines feature two new processes. The first is a dedicated process of diagnosis and management. The second is a defined Graduated Return To Play protocol that recognises that players across the IRB’s 117 Member Unions do not have the same level of access to dedicated medical assessment and supervision. If there is no dedicated medical supervision a mandatory 21-day stand down applies. Medical supervision is mandatory for children and adolescents.Joe Worsley during the 2007 Six NationsThe new diagnosis and management guidelines clearly define concussion symptoms in an easy to access format and emphasise that risks should never be taken with players; that players should be removed from the field immediately if there is any doubt that concussion may have been sustained and that a Graduated Return To Play protocol is accessible to players at all levels of the Game. The Graduated Return to Play protocol will add more flexibility and clarity for players as they enter the rehabilitation process in preparation for returning to play. The new protocol enables a player to move through a defined six-level process from rest to gentle exercise through to contact practice in a monitored environment before being able to play over a six-day period. Any recurrence of symptoms will result in the player returning to the previous stage after a period of 24 hours rest.The amended Regulation 10 is operational with immediate effect and the supporting education programme through the IRB and Member Unions will be rolled out this year.last_img read more

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first_img Lion’s roar: Paul O’Connell (above) and Alun Wyn Jones impressed in the second row against the WaratahsBy Paul Williams A structured winTHE LIONS recorded their fifth victory of the tour with a 47-17 win over a depleted, yet competitive, Waratahs team. But whilst the margin of victory was similar to that of the previous four matches, the execution was very different. This was a structured performance, partly due to the improved quality of the opposition, partly due to the fact that this was the last dress rehearsal for the test probables. The Lions secured 57% possession and 59% of the territory.The Lions’ scrum was once again of the required standard and contributed to a continuous supply of quality possession – which allowed Jamie Roberts to run attritional lines and Jon Davies to execute an intricate passing game. Leigh Halfpenny’s goal kicking was once again legitimately world-class and Tom Croft’s ball carrying has swung the ‘six’ debate in his favour. But whilst the statistics and player performances were important, it was the structured manner of the victory that matters most. Structured game plans consistently win test matches and that is all that matters from this point on.One of many: Davies completed 15 passes v the Waratahs Jon Davies showed he belongsJon Davies played one of the finest games of his career against the Waratahs. He made more clean breaks than any player, on either team, and carried the ball 141 metres. One hundred and forty one metres with ball in hand is an incredible number for a centre. You’d expect that figure from wings or fullbacks who benefit from cheap yardage gains while returning deep kicks, but every one of Davies’s yards was a result of direct running lines and tireless support play.But whilst Davies’s running game wasn’t overly surprising (it’s one of his key strengths) his passing game was, and this is an aspect of his game that has improved enormously over the past year. Often standing at second receiver Davies completed 15 passes, 3 of which directly contributed to tries – Jonathan Sexton only completed 13 passes in his 50 minute stint at fly-half. Whilst O’Driscoll is currently the holder of the Lions 13 test shirt, Davies isn’t far behind and may well be asked to take the 12 shirt in Roberts’ likely absence on Saturday.Lions’ locks dominated You rarely witness players that are happy being substituted – unless you’re watching a game of second team rugby where a grateful prop is crawling off the pitch carrying his lungs. However, when seven Lions left the field after a 58 minute stint against the Tahs they looked delighted. And so they should be. These weren’t purely tactical substitutions and they weren’t injured individuals leaving the field to be wrapped in ice – in fact they were being wrapped in cotton wool.These were players who are assured of being selected in the first Lions Test squad. Of course there is no guarantee that these players will start the Tests – but they will certainly be part of the 23. Keep an eye on their faces if they get yanked after 58 minutes against the Wallabies and you will see a very different reaction. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Much of the attention from Saturday’s game will focus on Tom Croft – and rightly so. It was an eye-catching performance consisting of solid defence in the narrow channels, effective lineout work and a trademark break in the wide channels – which will undoubtedly end up on the trailer for the 2013 Lions Tour DVD. However there were two Lions’ performances which won’t feature on that DVD, but were of equal importance.  Paul O’Connell and Alun-Wyn Jones put in Leonine performances.Both tirelessly hit rucks and made the ‘heavy’ two and three yard carries that create space out wide for the more agile carriers to make 15 yard gains. Jones was particularly impressive in that he managed to maintain his level of performance for 80 minutes – it was Jones who tracked back in the 80th minute and stole the Waratahs ball as it came free from a ruck. Alun-Wyn Jones and Paul O’Connell may not feature much on the Lions’ highlight-reel, but they will feature heavily next Saturday as key men.Central figure: Roberts is key to Gatland’s plansRoberts’s injury is a major worryThere have been numerous high profile injuries on the tour. Gethin Jenkins and Cian Healy’s early departures will have both given Warren Gatland cause for concern. However Jamie Roberts’s injury in the 68th minute will have given Gatland cause for a big swig of Australian Shiraz. Roberts has always been at the core of Gatland’s game plan, for Wales and now the Lions, and he is the strike runner around which the majority of phases are planned. Roberts’s ability to demolish the oppositions outside half and demand extra defensive cover from their backrow is how Gatland creates space in the wider channels.Jamie Roberts leads the kick chase, the defensive line and the blitz is far more effective when he plays – he made more tackles against the Waratahs than any back on either team. Roberts ‘holds’ defenders like no-one else as he showed when the Waratahs inside centre and blindside were glued to his decoy run – leaving Jon Davies and Simon Zebo a try scoring opportunity in the first minute. But Roberts doesn’t just affect the Lions game-plan, he also influences the opposition’s game-plan too – when defending a lineout the Tahs often moved their blindside into the ten channel and their ten into the five metre channel. There is no doubt that Jamie Roberts would have similar impact on Robbie Deans’s game plan too.Happy substitutes not for featured last_img read more

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first_img 30 Minutes with… Ireland scrum-half Conor MurrayWhat’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch?Playing for the Lions against the Rebels, I got up from the bottom of a ruck and heard a team-mate yelling to kick it out, so I booted it straight across the ruck, not looking for distance, and started jogging off thinking it was half-time, but the ref blew for the lineout. I turned around and Zeebs (Simon Zebo) was just laughing at me. He got fined for it later!Who are the jokers in the Ireland squad?Seany (O’Brien) and Luke Fitz are the main men. They keep us entertained. Seany is MC on long bus journeys and tells a few jokes and funny stories.What about practical jokes?Peter O’Mahony and Zeebs are probably up there. When my laundry comes back they rip it open, so when I come to collect it, it’s all over the floor. They think I don’t know it’s them, but I’m planning to get them back.Face of fury? Peter O’Mahony is “very intense and angry” according to Murray. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat did you get up to off the field at the World Cup?We’re together for a long time, so it’s important to do fun things. On one day off, we got to go to Alton Towers and we went clay pigeon shooting.It was supposed to be fun but got competitive very quickly! Peter O’Mahony is a bit of a sharpshooter – he’s into his hunting – so he came first. Paul O’Connell got a lot of help from the guy taking us round so he came a surprise second.What annoys you?Messy people. I’m quite tidy so I find it irritating when I’m in camp and have a room-mate who’s messy. Keith Earls is quite messy, but I whipped him into shape during the 2011 World Cup!If you could be any of your team-mates, who would it be? Scrum-half Conor Murray gives an insight into life inside the Ireland camp Just to be respected by other players. You try to impress people and fans, but being respected by your own team-mates is No 1 on my list.This article appeared in the November 2015 edition of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers click here, or find out how to download the digital edition here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Green machine: Conor Murray in action against France during RWC 2015. Photo: Getty Images I’ll go with Peter O’Mahony. He’s quite a crazy individual; he’s very intense and angry, so I’d love to see the world from his point of view, to be that angry. Just for a day, though.Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with?Paul O’Connell, because you wouldn’t be stuck in the lift for long! He’d find a way to get out by busting the roof off or pulling the doors open.What’s your guilty pleasure?Crisps. I love crisps, and dips. That’s what I’ll be eating when I finish rugby.Snack attack: Murray likes to indulge in a packet of crisps. Photo: Getty ImagesIf you could have one superpower, what would it be?To predict the future. In games it would be useful and in a lot of other things. You’d know what to do to change the future.What would you like to achieve outside of rugby?Just to be successful. I don’t know what I want to do yet, but I love food, so maybe I’ll open a restaurant. I could set one up close to a port to get fresh seafood all the time.How would you like to be remembered?last_img read more

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first_imgAt 6:19 Savea is top right of the frame with only two other Hurricanes behind him as Barrett goes to kick. By 6:28 an injection of pace has seen him cruise past T.J.Perenara as the main support option, and he duly arrives first at the contact situation at 6:30 – only for Barrett to select Willis Halaholo (on Savea’s right) for the offload and subsequent try.Ardie Savea attacking skills A long break which almost resulted in a second try for the Canes occurred at 28:48, and it showcased a full range of attacking skills by their #7. Savea first breaks through the poorly-guarded ‘boot’ of the Chiefs ruck at 28:48… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ardie Savea in defence Savea’s work-rate in defence was demonstrated by a sequence from a Chiefs’ attacking scrum in the middle of the second half. He starts pinned to left side of the Canes set-piece as the Chiefs move the ball away:The Chiefs bring off a neat loop play to create space down the right tram-lines, with their wing Tony Pulu now opposed by Savea who has folded beyond the last backs defender:Savea not only makes the tackle on Pulu, he gets up quickly enough to prise the ball away in contact and secure the turnover:Savea is demonstrating all the skills of a modern day flanker, in addition to some not usually associated with the No.7 shirt. He is fast becoming the stand-out player in Super Rugby, and if he can replicate recent performances against the Lions in the Super Rugby final on Saturday, an All Black starting Test jersey surely awaits him on August 20. Ardie Savea’s inspriational performance for the Hurricanes against the Chiefs has set him up as one of the key men in this year’s Super Rugby final. Here’s a look at his game… …before offsetting the Chiefs’ full-back Damian McKenzie with a superb kick-fake that buys him another 20 metres…center_img …and finally putting in a perfectly-weighted centering kick for T.J.Perenara to collect: Ardie Savea had a whale of a game against Sam Cane, the incumbent All Blacks No 7, in the Hurricanes’ Super Rugby semi-final win over the Chiefs in Wellington. From the Fox Sports footage we can see he is one of those exceptional individuals who threaten to redefine the limits of the position which they play.Savea’s stats in the semi-final were extraordinary:19 completed tackles with no misses. Two of Savea’s tackles could be classified as ‘dominant’ and 16 of them were one-on-one with the ball-carrier, rather than assists.Four forced fumbles in contact. Savea forced four turnovers in contact by the strength of his tackling, two in tight situations and another two chasing down backs.Jackaling at defensive breakdowns. Savea turned over one ball at the defensive breakdown and assisted at three others.Two clean breaks. Savea achieved two clean line-breaks from the pick & go slot at the base of the ruck and ran for a total of 73 metres in the game as a whole, the second highest total behind Beauden Barrett.Here are some of Savea’s highlights which illustrate what could be coming the Lions way in the Super Rugby final this weekend:Ardie Savea support play Savea has an ‘engine’ tuned to both outright speed and sustained running power. The following example at 6:19 shows him chasing a short kick by Barrett which led to the Canes’ first try: Watch the Super Rugby Final on Saturday August 6, live on Sky Sports 3 at 08:00am.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here.last_img read more

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first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players Colin Meads charges down a kick Major teams: King Country Country: New ZealandTest span: 1957-71Test caps: 55 (55 starts)Test points: 21 (7T)Between 1957 and 1971 he set a world cap record by appearing in 55 Tests, including New Zealand’s 17-Test winning streak between 1965 and 1969, and in all played 133 times for the All Blacks, a national record that stood for more than 40 years.For his hardness and implacability he was appropriately known as ‘Pinetree’. Meads put his strength down to the demanding outdoor life of his hillside stock farm at Waitete in the King Country. His arms were longer than average, giving him a physical advantage levering the ball free from mauls, and he was so versatile that in his youth he played Tests at flanker and No 8. On the hoof, flourishing the ball in one hand, he was a fearsome sight. Today’s TV scrutiny would have compelled him to rein in the darker side of his game. At Murrayfield in 1967 he became only the second player to be sent off in a major Test, and his enthusiasm for removing bodies on the wrong side of a ruck outraged Aussies when he dragged their captain, Ken Catchpole, with such brute force that the brilliant Wallaby was compelled to prematurely retire from rugby. But Meads could also take the rough stuff. When his head was lacerated by a French boot in 1967 he played on, and when his arm was broken by a kick in South Africa in 1970 he again played on. No player had such a high pain threshold.It was Barry John who put Meads’s standing as a rugby player in context. “A hundred years from now,” the Wales and Lions legend wrote, “when men are discussing the all-time greats, Colin Meads will always be near the top of the list.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sir Colin Meads, through his rugby achievements, is honoured as probably New Zealand’s greatest living citizen as well as the greatest All Black of them alllast_img read more

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first_imgLove this post! No matter what the score is, great sportsmanship is everything. As a Welshy obviously I’m chuffed but what a game!! — Helen Enser Morgan (@helenem06) February 24, 2019Related: Rugby’s need for more innovation England post their tidy dressing room pic on Sat eve. Monday morning Twitter still be like… pic.twitter.com/3jRrOCC1Hw— Nick Heath (@nickheathsport) February 25, 2019 Related: Twitter reacts to Harlequins calling replacements ‘Game Changers’ In the aftermath their 21-13 loss to Wales, the RFU’s social media gurus posted the above shot which was the result of England cleaning the changing room at the Principality Stadium. You might not realise it, but the subject of ‘sweeping the sheds’ – the act of tidying up a changing room after you’ve used it, which is meant to be a humble act that keeps megastars grounded –  is a hotly-contested one.Some believe that this is ‘rugby’s values’ at their best. There is no better visual to sum up the notions of respect for your opponents, that no one is too big to do the little jobs, and of a shared work-ethic, they believe.On the other side, some people find images like this cynical and crass; the act of bragging about how humble you are defeats the purpose, some say.So here’s what was posted on Twitter… Some thought this was rugby values at their best, some thought it was crass false humility… what do you think? When a team post their tidy post-game dressing room pictures on social media, aren’t they sending out mixed messages about the humility they seek to symbolise?— Damian Hughes (@LiquidThinker) February 24, 2019Related: Ruby Tui on how rugby transformed her life What do you think of it all? Let us know via our Twitter page, on Facebook or you can send us a letter at [email protected] as well.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Well played Wales. #ENGvWALEngland not on their game. And no plan B.But proud to see how they left the changing room @EnglandRugby pic.twitter.com/YFH5ff29G2— Oliver Rackham (@OliverRackham) February 24, 2019Well, as you can see, there are some differing views out there on this.Plenty of the complaints come from the fact that it was England who tweeted about this themselves, rather than their hosts, Wales. Some pointed to the football World Cup, when the Japanese national team cleaned the changing-room and left a thank you note for their opponents, but said nothing on social media about it – someone else discovered their gracious work. For them, that was a better example of humility.Anyway, the phenomena of shed sweeping won’t be going anywhere fast. Nor should it – the debate is about whether to post online about it or not. How the England Tugby team left the changing room after the game. RESPECT. pic.twitter.com/Zim6bMis6B— Aled Hughes (@aled_hughes1) February 24, 2019 Pure class from out most fierce rivals — Lewis Taylor (@lewaarta) February 23, 2019 It is exactly that. Thanks to the ‘Legacy’ book by James Kerr about the @AllBlacks and it’s team culture. it’s made a massive positive impact on The Rugby community and I’m sure in other communities as well. #SweepTheSheds — Roland Suniula (@suniula12) February 25, 2019 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This is how England left their changing room at Principality Stadium yesterday #respect #rugby https://t.co/LoTbi39mB7— Joe Sultana (@JoeSultana15) February 24, 2019 I just wish a team would post social media pics of tipping the bins all over the changing room and writing “fuck off” on the wall in boot mud.— Blood & Mud Rugby (@bloodandmud) February 24, 2019last_img read more

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first_imgThis article originally appeared in the March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Ireland full-back Eimear Considine cracking new sporting codeThe memory still makes Eimear Considine cringe. Playing for Ireland in a sevens match against the USA in San Diego, she gave away a penalty and remained standing close to her opponent, trying to put her off.“She started giving out to me,” says Considine. “I didn’t know what I was doing. I didn’t understand I had to be ten metres back.”It may sound strange for someone to be playing international rugby and not be familiar with the laws, but this was Considine’s first-ever game.A talented Gaelic Football and camogie player, she was 23 when approached by the Ireland Sevens set-up in 2014 – via a LinkedIn email – to see if she would take part in a trial. The IRFU were recruiting players from different sports as the country targeted a place at the 2016 Olympics.“I did some fitness testing and worked one-on-one with coaches – tackling, passing,” she says. “I joined up with a few girls from other sports doing skills and drills, then we were put in with the senior girls’ training. Someone got injured, there was space on the plane to San Diego and I was playing my first game against the USA. It all happened in the space of three months! @IrishRugby with the first try of the Autumn international, @EimearConsidine getting to within inches of the line, calm composure in recycling the ball with @DjougangLinda getting over the line for her first international try #IREvWAL @ScrumQueens pic.twitter.com/M51KsWurY2— Elaine Hayes MCCT (@e_hayes12) November 10, 2019This year could be busier than ever, though. She has a holiday booked to Australia in April to visit her sister, Ailish, who plays AFL for Adelaide Crows, but before and after that there is plenty on the rugby agenda.Ireland’s Six Nations campaign has been disrupted by the coronavirus outbreak, their fourth-round game against Italy postponed after wins over Scotland and Wales and a defeat by England. The big goal this year, though, is September’s European qualifying tournament for the 2021 World Cup.“Qualifying for the World Cup and then performing in that World Cup because at the last one we didn’t perform to our best. Those are three big aims for every girl in the squad. We want to put Ireland rugby back on the map.” “Rugby came at a good time. I was living in Dublin but playing Gaelic Football and camogie for my county, Clare. I was sick of the travel and the commitment of being involved with two sports.“Rugby was in Dublin so I thought I’d give it a try, a new challenge. There was the international draw, too. My sport would never allow me to qualify for the Olympics. I never expected to get so far.”Ireland didn’t make it to Rio but she did get to play sevens all over the world. Then Munster called her up for the InterProvincial Championship, even though she’d never played 15s. Within a year, she was playing at a World Cup.“It was like starting all over again,” says Considine. “They’re completely different games, sevens and 15s. I’d only played three-and-a-half games before my first Ireland cap in the Six Nations and then I was playing in the World Cup. It’s crazy. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Swapping Gaelic Football for rugby meant a steep learning curve but she is thriving now “I’m 28 now and the younger girls say, ‘You’re so experienced’, but I’ve only played two seasons of 15s as I went travelling for a year after the World Cup.” Pass master: Eimear Considine in action for Ireland (Getty Images) I’m proud to support @20×20.ie and you too can #ShowYourStripes & pledge to PARTICIPATE, ATTEND or PROMOTE women’s sport. Play your part in shaping the future of sport in Ireland! #20×20 @20x20_ie #ShowYourStripes @Duckyc7 @ljfeely @griffinciara94 pic.twitter.com/M2SeLHWnrP— Eimear Considine (@EimearConsidine) March 8, 2020Considine has now clearly found her feet at Test level. She featured in Ireland’s back three for every game of last year’s Six Nations and was Player of the Match in November against Wales – an impressive feat when on the losing side. She worked as a pundit for eir Sport during last year’s men’s World Cup too.The regular day job is teaching PE and Irish at St Mary’s in Glasnevin, and she says the school are “amazing” when it comes to time off for rugby. She feels teaching complements her rugby, allowing her to switch off from the pressures of international sport.“The joke at work is what life will I have this weekend – famous life or teacher life! I have two separate lives and it’s good to be able to box off rugby on a Monday once I step into school. The only thing I’d like more of is time.”last_img read more

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first_img Stepping down: Outgoing Australia CEO Raelene Castle (Getty Images) Pre-resignation: “He (Rennie) will come here regardless of where I sit”.— Christy Doran (@ChristypDoran) April 23, 2020In a statement provided to ABC, Castle said: “I love rugby on every level and I will always love the code and the people I have had the honour of working with since I took this role. I made it clear to the board that I would stand up and take the flack and do everything possible to serve everyone’s best interests. Outgoing Rugby Australia CEO Raelene Castle on incoming Wallabies coach Dave Rennie on ABC 7:30. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Raelene Castle resigns as Rugby Australia CEOAfter a period of sustained pressure, Rugby Australia boss Raelene Castle has stepped down from her position as Chief Executive.Castle resigned after the RA board made it clear on Thursday afternoon that the CEO no longer had the support of the group. It has not been an easy few years for rugby union Down Under.It made global headlines when earlier in the week a number of former Wallabies skipper sent a letter to the RA board, demanding a change of administration, stating that the sport had “lost its way.” Among the 11 co-signatories were Nick Farr-Jones and Phil Kearns, who have both been touted as potential replacements for Castle.There have been other rocky moments for the Australians during the last few years. The main topics of discussion at the moment are the sport’s precarious finances and the uncertainty over deals for broadcasting rights and the imapct of coronavirus-enforced shut-downs. “In the last couple of hours, it has been made clear to me that the board believes my no longer being CEO would help give them the clear air they believe they need. The game is bigger than any one individual – so this evening I told the Chair that I would resign from the role.CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW TO DOWNLOAD THE DIGITAL EDITION OF RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINEcenter_img The Rugby Australia boss had been under enormous pressure of late Hugely disappointing. Rugby across the world is struggling and the only fall person just happens to be the most senior woman in the game.The coorindated campaign against her by a group of men offering no solutions felt wrong on so many counts. What a shame. https://t.co/kpEbqdSkmM— Scrumqueens – Women’s Rugby (@ScrumQueens) April 23, 2020We witnessed the drawn-out legal fight with former star player Israel Folau, after the full-back posted religious messages on his social media account that generated controversy and opposed the union’s, and sport’s, stated values. There was also talk of a fall-out with former Wallabies coach Michael Cheika and the team’s most recent Rugby World Cup performance came in for scrutiny.However, Castle’s supporters have pointed out that the executive inherited a large number of problems and in the meantime has overseen a bolstering of the nation’s junior sides, and it looks as if Australia have a strong chance at securing the hosting rights for the 2027 World Cup. And Castle had made some impressive hires for the new Wallabies coaching set-up, led by highly-rated Kiwi boss Dave Rennie. “I will do whatever is needed to ensure an orderly handover. I wish the code and everyone who loves rugby nothing but the best and I would like to thank the people I work with and the broader rugby community for their enormous support.”The biggest question the Rugby Australia board now face is: who will replace her? There may be an internal selection process, from within the board; there is the push for Farr-Jones or Kearns; they may seek some outside influence.There is also the small matter of the election for the next World Rugby chairman, with an electronic vote held next week and results shared on 12 May.Australia get three votes, as they have three spots on the World Rugby council. Castle held one spot alongside Paul McLean and Brett Robinson. It is yet to be clarified what will happen with RA’s third spot, following Castle’s call.Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Africa, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Sudan & South Sudan Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN In South Sudan, agencies aid victims of inter-ethnic fighting Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [Ecumenical News International] Christian humanitarian agencies are delivering relief aid to thousands of people displaced in inter-tribal conflict in South Sudan, the world’s newest nation.The assistance is targeting nearly 60,000 people in Jonglei State where a cycle of violence between two pastoralist communities is continuing. The Lou-Nuer and the Murle have a history of raiding each other’s cattle, women and children, but Christian leaders want the communities to give up arms.“I urge the government to disarm the two communities (whose members posses illegal arms), simultaneously. The action should also be extended to other armed communities in the state,” Anglican Bishop Alapayo Manyang Kuctiel of Rumbek told ENInews in a telephone interview from South Sudan on Jan. 16. South Sudan was declared independent on July 9, 2011.The new round of violence started in late December after an estimated 6,000 fighters from the Lou–Nuer charged through Pibor County in Jonglei State, killing hundreds of people from the Murle community. Since then, the Murle have staged a series of revenge attacks. By Jan. 13, the government estimated that nearly 100 people had been killed in reprisal attacks. Within the last seven months, nearly 1,000 people have been killed in the cycle of attacks, according to the United Nations.With tensions escalating in the state and civilians fleeing their homes, the government declared the state a disaster zone on Jan. 5. It appealed to international relief agencies to provide humanitarian assistance to the affected population. In response, the U.N. has mounted a massive humanitarian operation to aid the people said to be living in the bush.“It is extremely difficult to reach these people as there are virtually no roads or airstrips. They will be lacking even the most basic supplies and services,” Arie Den Toom, the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) South Sudan country representative, said in a statement on Jan. 13.The LWF, alongside the U.N. agencies, is delivering non-food items, with medical supplies being provided in a hospital in the city of Juba. The group is working with other members of the ACT (Action by Churches Together) Alliance that include Norwegian Church Aid and the Sudan Council of Churches.“The people of Jonglei must be supported quickly — to end violence, protect civilians and provide humanitarian assistance even in the most remote area where access proves difficult,” said John Nduna, ACT Alliance general secretary.Leaders are now voicing concerns that the cattle raids are threatening stability in the new nation. The clergy, who had endured decades of civil war, had welcomed the new government as a “dawn of hope.” Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By Fredrick NzwiliPosted Jan 17, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

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first_imgLent Madness: A lighthearted approach to saintly education Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Lent, February 21, 2012 at 7:11 pm Patty,Lent Madness is free and open to the public. You just go to the website (www.lentmadness.org) on February 23. There will be a post about the two saints who are facing each other. The first day, it’s Joan of Arc vs. Lancelot Andrewes. At the bottom of that entry will be a place to select your favored saint and vote. The next day, you’ll get the results, and you can vote in the next pairing. And so on.Enjoy!Peace, Scott+ Comments are closed. February 21, 2012 at 9:45 pm This sounds like fun. Thanks for sharing. Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Marilee Creelan says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Sharon SheridanPosted Feb 21, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Theological Education Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tim Schenck[Episcopal News Service] Anyone who considers Lent boring or deadly serious never met the Rev. Tim Schenck.While other Episcopalians may be contemplating whether to give up chocolate or alcohol, or which spiritual discipline to take on for a solemn 40 days, Schenck is busy pondering whether Augustine or Lancelot Andrewes would match up better with Joan of Arc in a saintly sparring match.In 2010, Schenck started Lent Madness, a saint-vs-saint online competition on his blog modeled after college basketball’s March Madness tournament. The idea caught on, and the madness has spread to include celebrity bloggers and, this year, its own website and Facebook fan page and a partnership with Forward Movement.Scott Gunn“I basically started it on a whim. I love sports, and I love Lent, so I thought: Why not combine these two?” said Schenck, rector of St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church in Hingham, Massachusetts.Why should basketball fans have all the fun “while we’re sitting around giving up chocolate?” he reasoned. “Lent is not all gloom and doom. What can be more joyful than a season specifically set apart to be closer to God?”Teaming up with Forward Movement’s executive director, the Rev. Scott Gunn, Schenck has created a tournament-like single-elimination bracket of 32 diverse saints. Each day, the website will feature information about two saints in a matchup, and readers will vote for their favorite. Each round of voting will halve the competing saints, from 32 to the Round of the Saintly Sixteen, the Round of the Elate Eight, the Final Four and finally two vying for the coveted Golden Halo.In the first round, voters receive straightforward biographical information about the saints to help them decide which to favor. At the next level, voters read “quotes and quirks” about the Saintly Sixteen. “And then we get into ‘saintly kitsch,’ which is one of my favorites,” Schenck said. “At this point, you figure that almost everybody that’s been participating has learned something about the saints and they’ve kind of figured out which ones they really identified with. Then we can have some real fun with it from there.”Schenck’s favorite bit of kitsch? “Clare of Assisi is the patron saint of television because, when she was too ill to attend services, they appeared on the wall of her cell.”Last year, Schenck enlisted four “celebrity bloggers” to advocate for the saints in the Final Four and Golden Halo rounds. This year, eight contributors from across the Episcopal Church will participate from the beginning, handling most of the research and writing. “I’m serving basically as coach,” Schenck said.Gunn – who is helping with tournament technology and publicity – has embraced Lent Madness from the beginning. The first year, he lobbied hard (and successfully) for George Herbert to win the first Golden Halo, since the title of his blog, Seven Whole Days, comes from a Herbert poem found in the 1982 Hymnal. In 2011, he was an official celebrity blogger. “I tried desperately to get Thomas Beckett to win against C.S. Lewis — and I lost.”“This year, of course, I’m staying scrupulously neutral,” he said.So is contributor Heidi Shott, canon for communications and social justice in the Diocese of Maine — at least in the first round. “Apparently as we get closer in, we can show our true stripes,” she said. “I already have my favorites!”She did question the wisdom of pitting two of her saints against each other in round one. “I don’t know if it’s because I’m the mother of sons, but they assigned me both Monica and Augustine of Hippo, which is just crazy — putting a mother against her son, and vice versa — so I have a great deal of passion around this.”Her other saintly bios chronicle the accomplishments of Emma of Hawaii and Enmegahbowh, whose wife also is “remarkable,” she discovered (“More on her in the subsequent rounds” — if Enmegahbowh gets past Thomas).Shott said she’d found the “madness” educational and fun. “It can teach us a lot about what saintliness means beyond our little hymn we sing once a year. It’s an excellent discipline, and it’s fun.”Noted Schenck, “This is not your grandfather’s Lenten discipline, but it was a way … to make the saints come alive for people. So often we as a church kind of trap and immobilize the saints in stained glass and oil paintings and statuary. This is a way to remind everybody that these were real people.At Forward Movement, Gunn said, “Lent Madness offers us a chance to connect with people with whom we might not otherwise connect.” And to their regular readers, he said, “it’s an opportunity to say: It’s okay to crack a smile in church. The proof of the goodness of something in church isn’t how seriously you take it. It’s actually how much it makes you grow as a person, and Lent Madness is actually a pretty fun way to do that.”Ah, but what about wagering on the outcome?Biblically speaking, the apostles did choose Mathias to replace Judas by drawing lots, Gunn said. “He’s arguably the patron saint of lotteries. But we as the executive committee of Lent Madness don’t condone gambling.”“I don’t think,” Schenck said, “that anybody is getting rich off Lent Madness. I don’t believe that you can call your bookie in Las Vegas and get the line on, say, Thomas Cranmer’s chances versus Augustine’s.”“I know a number of Canterbury Clubs [on college campuses] are participating this year, and they’re all filling out their brackets,” he added. “I don’t think anyone is actually gambling, per se, but they are competing with the caveat that if anyone is actually making any money, of course, that it will go to charity. We recommend Episcopal Relief & Development.”Voters also are on the honor system to cast one ballot per saint, no dirty politicking allowed. “Yes, we have dead people competing, but we don’t want dead people voting,” Schenck said.The voting begins Thursday, Feb. 23.Let the games begin.—Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent.En español: bit.ly/zyD2KE Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Margaret Smist says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing February 21, 2012 at 4:59 pm THis sounds like fun. I would love to join in on the voting. Is it open to the public. How do you get in? Patty Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Comments (7) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Scott Gunn says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Chris Carey says: February 21, 2012 at 7:10 pm I see that your first match up is Joan of Arc v. Lancelot Andrews. Pretty lame. An ignorant (although sympathetic) peasant girl against an articulate and eductated apologist for the protestant church. Although there is a good argument that Joan of Arc’s greatest sin (in the eyes of the Roman Catholic Church) was that she was a Protestant, espousing a direct relationship with God without the assistance of the Church and clergy, her real sins were political, and she was handed over to martyrdom at the hands of the English, having created an independent France. I am an attorney, represtenting poor, incompetent and crazy people, and I often argue that if Joan had lived today we woud have put her on prozac and all of those Frenchman would still have been speaking English today.. She was a nationalist, a hero and a martyr, but putting her up against a scholar is possibly unfair. Note that the Roman Catholic Chuch did not beatize her until 1917, during the First World War, having been suspicious of her Protestant message until then.Lancelot Andrews, however, was a great scholar (Joan propably could not read nor write). He was involved in the great prolemical debates creating our church. He was popular with Elizabeth and James and often preached before them. He was instrumental in the greatnest of Oxford. Although my vote is on Lancelot Andrews, I predict that Joan of Arc will will.Barbara A. Cadwell February 28, 2012 at 12:32 pm And, what’s the difference between this game and sainthood or are they just more of the same? If there is no difference and/or distinction, then the answer becomes quite clear (at least for me). Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books February 27, 2012 at 6:13 pm I missed the first round this year. I still cannot where to click to get the Lent Madness site to come up. marilee creelan Rector Washington, DC Patty Reichert says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN R. A. Garcia says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Barbara A. Cadwell says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ February 22, 2012 at 8:10 am All you need to do is click on the link above to the website. This is really entertaining – do it! Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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