August 1, 2021
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first_imgThe provincial government announced its new action plan to improve the health of seniors today.The ‘Healthy Living Framework’ lays out the government’s priorities for dealing with an aging population, including four cornerstones of creating age-friendly communities, supporting volunteerism, promoting healthy living, and supporting older workers. The plan also creates a seniors secretariat, which will lead the implementation of the framework across the government. – Advertisement -After rolling out the new 3 year plan, the minister responsible says our aging population needs more than housing. Mary Polak (Pole-Ack) says a government promise to create five-thousand longterm care beds is close to being fullfilled, but that isn’t the end of the story. [asset|aid=252|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=Polak-seniors_1_Pub.mp3] Advertisement Polak says the 23-million dollar framework was developed with support from 13-ministries over the course of a year.last_img read more

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first_imgMorneau said construction on the pipeline is underway and the decision to go forward has been made, which means there is really no way to use it as a bargaining chip in the minority government.“My expectation is that we have much common ground between the other parties that have been elected to the next Parliament,” said Morneau.“We will be seeking consensus on how we can move forward on that common ground. This project we’ve already moved forward on. It’s one that we’ve said that we’re moving forward on, we’ve actually already gone through that process.”Construction on the expansion is supposed to be done by the middle of 2022. The Liberal platform forecasted taking revenues of $125 million from Trans Mountain Canada in 2021-22 and then $500 million in each of the next two years.Advertisement Thus far, more than 2,200 workers have been hired.The pipeline runs from a terminal east of Edmonton to a marine terminal in Burnaby, B.C. The expansion will see a second pipeline built roughly parallel to the first that can carry almost twice as much crude oil every day.There is however a new federal court challenge underway from Indigenous communities who argued the secondary consultation process undertaken by the government earlier this year was a sham.Mia Rabson, The Canadian Press OTTAWA — The Liberal government expects to get $500 million a year out of the expanded Trans Mountain pipeline and is promising to spend it all on cleaner sources of energy and projects that pull carbon out of the atmosphere.Finance Minister Bill Morneau told The Canadian Press in an interview this week that the expanded pipeline is not fodder for negotiating with other parties in the minority government. Rather, he said, it is a crucial piece of the puzzle of financing Canada’s transition to a clean energy economy.“We purchased it for a reason,” said Morneau. “We now see how it can help us accelerate our clean energy transition by putting any revenues that we get from it into a transition to clean energy. We think that is the best way we can move forward in our current context.”- Advertisement -The Liberal government bought the existing pipeline for $4.5 billion in 2018, in a bid to overcome the opposition of the British Columbia government to the expansion.Federally, the two parties with the most in common with the Liberals on climate change both think the expansion should be cancelled. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, whose party has enough seats to support the Liberals through any confidence votes, wants tougher climate action but has stopped short of using the pipeline as a line in the sand.He has suggested that ship has effectively sailed.Advertisementcenter_img Eventually Morneau said the plan is to sell it back to the private sector and all of the revenues from the sale will then go to clean energy development and other climate change action projects.The one specific promise the Liberals made that they connected to pipeline revenues was a $300-million annual fund for natural climate solutions including tree planting, as well as conservation and restoration of forests, grasslands, agricultural lands and coastal areas.Construction on the pipeline was halted in September 2018, after the Federal Court of Appeal overturned federal approval citing insufficient environmental and Indigenous consultations.Cabinet undertook new rounds of both and approved the expansion a second time in June.Construction on the pipeline then resumed in August, starting with work on the marine terminals in British Columbia and pumping stations in Alberta. The first 50 km of actual pipeline will start being laid in the Edmonton area shortly, a spokesperson for Trans Mountain Canada said Wednesday.Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Requests for emergency shelter soared 30 percent last year in the city of Los Angeles, the highest increase in the nation, according to a recent study by the U.S. Conference of Mayors. The study also found that 76 percent of cities surveyed had an increase in requests for food assistance. Such requests in L.A. increased 25 percent, the fourth-highest increase in the nation, which averaged a 12 percent increase. “Los Angeles County has more homeless men, women and children than any other region in the United States with more than 90,000 people who are homeless every single night in the county,” said Paul Tepper, director of the Institute for the Study of Homelessness and Poverty at the Weingart Center in Los Angeles. “The underlying reason that homelessness is growing – and for that matter exists – is quite simple. It’s poverty.” In the 1960s, homelessness was not an issue in L.A., he said. There was a handful of shelters, mostly missions from the turn of the century. “Today, there are hundreds of shelters in the county,” he said. The annual survey of 24 major cities nationwide, which did not factor in weather conditions, sought information on the demand for emergency food assistance and emergency shelter, the capacity of local agencies to meet the demand, the causes of hunger and homelessness and programs cities use to respond to the needs and availability of affordable housing for low-income people. The survey comes as Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the Board of Supervisors, LAPD Chief William J. Bratton and Sheriff Lee Baca have dedicated funds and expressed a renewed interest in solving the homelessness problem. Bob Erlenbusch, executive director of the Los Angeles Coalition to End Hunger & Homelessness, said the county’s homeless population is twice the size of New York City’s, and it would take the combined totals of homeless people in the cities with the third- to 10th-highest populations of homeless to equal the number in the county. “Overall, the lack of affordable housing, the lack of mental health and substance abuse services, unemployment and poverty has had a cumulative effect of continuing to add to the ranks of the homeless in L.A.,” Erlenbusch said. The survey also found that more than half of the cities reported that emergency food assistance programs were not able to provide an adequate supply of food. Nationwide, more than half of those requesting food were families and their children. In the county, about a third of food assistance agencies said they not only had to decrease the quantity of food but had to limit the number of times families had to get food. Although the hundreds of thousands of evacuees from Hurricane Katrina and Rita have not yet had a significant strain on resources, officials are concerned that what they called a lack of federal commitment to the evacuees could eventually reduce resources devoted to the hungry and homeless. “The impacts of Hurricane Katrina and Rita have exposed the poverty and needs that have been in this report for the last 20 years,” said Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill, president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Troy Anderson, (213) 974-8985 [email protected]last_img read more

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