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first_imgBy Andréa Barretto/Diálogo October 04, 2017 Brazil is the South American nation that has suffered the most cyberattacks in recent years. According to information from the Guide to Cyber Defense in South America, a book published on August 23rd by the Ministry of Defense, cybercrimes affect more than 20 million Brazilians a year and cost the Brazilian government a net total of $8 billion. The publication brings together public data from 12 South American nations, as well as French Guiana, on initiatives in the areas of cyberdefense and security. This work, never published before in the region, was done by a group of scholars with incentives from Brazil’s National Council on Scientific and Technological Development and the Brazilian Institute of Defense Studies, an organization in charge of collecting data, conducting research, and producing analyses that are used by the Brazilian Ministry of Defense in its decision-making process. “At universities, there has been increasing interest in this issue,” stated Marcos Aurelio Guedes de Oliveira, a professor in the Political Science graduate program at Pernambuco Federal University and one of the authors of the guide. According to Guedes, most of the attention directed at the issue is due to the increasing number of cyberattacks and other crimes, not only in the defense sector, but also in the civil sector. “Imagine that your email data is stolen. That’s already a problem for the individual. Now consider the proportions that are gained when it’s about data at a national level,” he alerted. Cooperation and reinforcement The guide makes a distinction between cybersecurity and cyberdefense. The former “concerns issues relating to public safety.” While the latter refers to “the act of protecting a nation’s critical information technology and communication systems. In addition, it includes cyber issues and matters that may affect a nation’s survival.” In South America, each nation deals with cyberdefense and security in its own way. In Brazil, as distinguished from Colombia for example, there is a security structure that is separate from defense. And while issues relating to cybersecurity are the responsibility of the President’s Institutional Security Cabinet, those concerned with cyberdefense fall within the military sphere, especially the Brazilian Army, through its Cyber Defense Command (ComDCiber, per its Portuguese acronym). Service members from all three branches of the armed forces lead ComDCiber’s activities, whose mission is planning, orienting, coordinating, and controlling operational, doctrinal, development, and training activities within the scope of the Military Cyber Defense System. ComDCiber’s structure includes a Cyber Defense Center (CDCiber, per its Portuguese acronym), a unit established in 2011 as one of the ways of meeting the guidance issued by the National Defense Strategy, which defines the cyber sector as being strategic for the nation, alongside the nuclear and space sectors. “Brazil is the South American country that has invested the most in cyberdefense,” asserted professor Guedes, who believes that the nations of the region need to join together. “Cooperation is necessary, and we need to regulate the sector. That will lead to a greater strengthening of these institutions in the face of problems related to the cyber sector. As far as that goes, Brazil can play quite an important role, because it has more experience,” he added. Capturing the flag Among the activities that ComDCiber carries out are competitions to train service members. On June 29th, one of these twice yearly events took place. “It’s a chance for them to get trained on putting the knowledge they’ve acquired into practice. The big difficulty in the cyber arena is putting what you’ve learned into practice. So when we have a competition like this, it’s an excellent opportunity to test out what we’ve learned,” explained Brazilian Army Lieutenant Colonel Marcelo Antônio Righi, of ComDCiber. Mandabyte, the Third Armed Forces Cyber Competition, had participation from 243 service members—147 from the Brazilian Army, 48 from the Brazilian Navy, and 48 from the Air Force—as well as six civilian professionals. The competitors were divided into 84 teams. All members got a user name and password that let them interface with the championship platform from their own computer. When the event began simultaneously for all groups dispersed throughout Brazil, 18 “capture the flag” challenges were launched. In that player mode, each team has to defend a system and invade the adversary’s system. The one who finishes hacking first and gets the target data is the winner. According to ComDCiber, the rules of the competition are simple, “and they are focused exclusively on performing the assigned tasks, with any cyber activity that might compromise the running of the competition being disallowed and subjecting the team to disqualification.” That is controlled by ComDCiber itself. After six hours of continuous play, the winner of the Third Armed Forces Cyber Competition was team ZeroByte, from the Brazilian Army’s 41st Telematics Center (41º CT, per its Portuguese acronym), headquartered in Belém, in the state of Pará. “Something that made this competition quite interesting was the fact that some challenges depended on others to be solved,” the 41º CT’s team stated. Taking first place represented progress for ZeroByte, which had only come in 10th and 6th, respectively, in the two previous editions of Mandabyte.last_img read more

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first_imgFollowing a disappointing split at Ohio State, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team begins preparation this week for perhaps its biggest weekend of the season. As they do so, the ceiling of the hockey rink will be replaced by blue skies for what is sure to be the sporting event of the winter.“We’re looking forward to finally getting on the outdoor ice,” interim head coach Tracey DeKeyser said. “I know a lot of our players are very appreciative and just pumped to be part of such a great hockey celebration with the Culver’s Camp Randall Hockey Classic.”The novelty of outdoor hockey arrives in Madison just in time to elevate the already big stage being set between Wisconsin and Bemidji State.Coming off the split series on the road against Ohio State, Wisconsin (15-10-3, 12-9-1) sits alone in third place of the WCHA but with little room to breath. Bemidji State rests at fourth place and is eyeing third as they rest only one point behind Wisconsin in the standings.With six games remaining in the regular season, the playoff race has begun to heat up. The Badgers aim to lock up a top-four finish within the WCHA so as to host a best-of-three series in the WCHA playoffs. Four teams — including Wisconsin and Bemidji State — are separated by as many as three points for the final two spots.Moreover, the Badgers are sitting on the fringe of the top eight in the national standings and will need convincing victories down the stretch in order to secure an NCAA tournament birth.“With Bemidji right on our heels, just one point behind us, every point that we are able to gather is so crucial,” DeKeyser said. “Not just for the WCHA playoffs, but for the national standings and just for hopefully getting voted in at the end of the year.”DeKeyser realizes while the outdoor classic is a special event, she cannot allow her team to get too sidetracked by the game’s unique qualities.As such, DeKeyser will have the team practice outdoors all week in order for the team to adjust to the outdoor conditions and shed any distracting sense of novelty.“Hopefully getting out a couple days in advance and getting through the novelty of the whole situation will help,” DeKeyser said. “It’s funny, I went out yesterday to Vilas Park to kind of ‘prep’ myself for the weekend, and I got complete wind burn on my face, so my advice to them will be put Vaseline on your cheeks before you go out.”Nevertheless, DeKeyser happily admits a big reason why she is excited for the game at Camp Randall is exactly for what the game is — a hockey game outdoors.Nearly the entire roster of Badgers, as well as DeKeyser, grew up in cold climates while playing hockey outdoors. Among them, the Camp Randall Classic will certainly stir up fond memories of their youth.When asked about her level of excitement for the game, DeKeyser answered by getting lost in an old memory of her youth in Ashton, Ontario when she would play hockey outside of her house.“It just reminds me of being a kid,” she said. “I was a huge hockey enthusiast as a child. I remember I had about an hour bus ride home and I used to sit by the window and I used to evaluate the ditches on the way home and see the ice conditions, because when I got home, if our ditch was just perfect, I would be shoveling it off and making sure that I could get out there a couple hours before hockey practice.“This just brings me back to the reality of the game and what we all live for, you know, when you’re eight to 15 years old. This is just a great reminder of our roots and I think our players have a shared experience.”last_img read more

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