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first_img Bio Latest Posts Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all) Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at [email protected] ELLSWORTH — Whether runners were wearing various shades of red, white and blue, camouflage-patterned clothing or anything else of note, Ellsworth had a patriotic feel in the air early Sunday morning.A total of 130 runners gathered at the Down East Family YMCA’s James Russell Wiggins Center on Sunday for the this year’s edition of the Veterans Remembrance Road Race. The fourth annual running of the race, which took place behind the Wiggins Center on Pond Street, stretched a total of 4 miles and featured runners as young as 9 years old and as old as 79.Prior to the race, a commemorative walk was held in which a number of contestants carried stones the entire length of the course. Those stones were engraved with the names of fallen soldiers.Among the stone carriers were Jason and Kristin Partridge of Bangor, both of whom are veterans themselves. The two hoisted their stones, which they said contained the names of former Air National Guard members, over their shoulders as they crossed the finish line.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text“All these runners are very dedicated to their veterans and honoring what they fought so hard for,” DEFY Fitness Director Robin Clarke said. “They’ve done a lot of research on their soldiers.”One runner proudly held up a Wounded Warrior Project flag in his right hand from start to finish. Two others, James Perry of Eastbrook and Adam Murphy of Bangor, wore American flag-colored body suits that covered everything from their toes to their eyes the length of the race.Despite any possible hindrances that resulted from their festive attire, both Perry and Murphy placed in their respective age groups. Perry finished first among 20-29 men, and Murphy was second in the 40-49 grouping.Spectators applaud Judson Cake as he approaches the finish line at the Veterans Remembrance Road Race on Nov. 12 in Ellsworth. Cake won the race with a time of 21 minutes, 37 seconds. ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY MIKE MANDELLElsewhere at the front of the pack, 39-year-old Judson Cake of Bar Harbor was the race’s top finisher with a winning time of 21 minutes, 37 seconds. Ellsworth High School’s Matt Shea finished exactly three minutes behind him to claim second place.Rounding out the top five were Ellsworth’s Rob Shea, Dedham’s Jim Hunt and Tremont’s Stanley Grierson. The top female finisher was Winterport’s Cecilia Dube, whose time of 27 minutes, 31 seconds earned her sixth place overall.Age group winners from Ellsworth were Matt Shea (men, 10-19), Rob Shea (men, 40-49) and Lloyd Harmon (men, 70-99). Second-place award winners from the city were Andrew Kephart (men, 30-39) Jamie Harding (women, 30-39), Tom Kirby (60-69) and Nancy Patterson (women, 60-69).All veterans were allowed to compete in the race for free with valid military identification. A total of 21 veterans competed in the event, and a portion of the proceeds benefited The Summit Project and the Maine Veterans Project.The next scheduled road race in Hancock County will be the Santa Run 5K, which will be held Dec. 3 at the Ellsworth Elementary-Middle School. Registration begins 8 a.m. on race day, and the event will begin at 10.center_img Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020last_img read more

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first_img“He’s trying to get back his game at the major league level,” Manager Mike Scioscia said. “He missed most of the season. There are going to be some rough spots here or there. He’s at times pitching very well and at times missing his spots, getting behind and making mistakes. The stuff is there. Maybe the command isn’t as consistent as we know it can be with Matt.”While the Angels try to figure out what Shoemaker can be going forward, they also have to consider the fact that he’s going to be arbitration-eligible for the third time this winter, due to make somewhere north of $5 million.Shoemaker said he’s got no doubt that he can again be a frontline starter. He said there were moments even during Thursday’s game when was pitching to his capabilities, but it all came undone with a hanging slider.And then the game got even more out of hand after he left.“We were out of this early,” Scioscia said, “and it kept getting worse.” He then gave up four straight hits to start the third, with two runs scoring. After strikeouts to Khris Davis and Matt Olson got him to the edge of escaping the jam, he left a slider over the plate that Stephen Piscotty blasted over the left field fence, for a three-run homer.“I can deal with them putting a few singles together,” Shoemaker said. “That’s going to happen. They scored a couple runs. The frustrating part … is to battle to two outs, get two strikes and then make a bad pitch. I’ve just got to limit it right there.”That was all for Shoemaker, who now has allowed 11 earned runs in 17-1/3 innings in four games.As the Angels’ front office makes it evaluations heading into the winter, they likely aren’t placing too much weight on what happens with Shoemaker in September. However, looking at the entire 99 games and 537 innings of his major league career also yields confusing results.In 2014, he went 16-4 with a 3.04 ERA, finishing second in the AL Rookie of the Year balloting and helping the Angels to the playoffs. His ERA jumped to 4.46 in 2015, a year that included him getting demoted briefly to Triple-A.Shoemaker also struggled at the beginning of 2016, before turning it around and pitching brilliantly for most of the second half. But the second half of 2017 and almost all of 2018 have been spent on the disabled list. He believes his problems were finally solved in May, when a split pronator tendon was diagnosed and repaired in surgery. It’s left Shoemaker in spring training form now.Related Articles Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter center_img Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield PreviousOakland Athletics’ Khris Davis (2) slides past Los Angeles Angels catcher Francisco Arcia (37) to score on a run on a single by Stephen Piscotty during the fourth inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Matt Shoemaker (52) throws against the Oakland Athletics during the first inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Angels’ Jose Fernandez (20) hits a double to drive in a run against the Oakland Athletics during the third inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Los Angeles Angels’ Kole Calhoun (56) is congratulated by teammate Mike Trout, left, after scoring a run on a Jose Fernandez double against the Oakland Athletics during the third inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Oakland Athletics’ Matt Chapman hits a double to drive in two runs against the Oakland Athletics during the third inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 20: Matt Shoemaker #52 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the first inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 20, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Matt Shoemaker (52) throws against the Oakland Athletics during the first inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 20: Stephen Piscotty #25 of the Oakland Athletics swings and watches the flight of his ball as he hits a three-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the bottom of the third inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 20, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Matt Shoemaker (52) walks back to the mound as Oakland Athletics’ Stephen Piscotty, left, rounds the base after hitting a three-run home run during the third inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Oakland Athletics’ Stephen Piscotty, right, is congratulated by teammate Jed Lowrie (8) after hitting a three-run home run against the Oakland Athletics during the third inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Matt Shoemaker (52) is taken out of the game against the Oakland Athletics during the third inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Los Angeles Angels second baseman Kaleb Cowart (22) can’t make the catch on a single by Oakland Athletics’ Ramon Laureano during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Oakland Athletics’ Stephen Piscotty (25) hits a three-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels during the third inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout hits a solo home run against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout is congratulated after hitting a solo home run against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 20: Stephen Piscotty #25 of the Oakland Athletics is congratulated by Jed Lowrie #8 and Matt Chapman #26 after Piscotty hit a three-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the bottom of the third inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 20, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 20: Ramon Laureano #22 of the Oakland Athletics scores sliding in at home plate before the throw to Francisco Arcia #37 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the bottom of the fourth inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 20, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 20: Junichi Tazawa #47 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the fourth inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 20, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Oakland Athletics’ Marcus Semien hits a double to drive in three runs against the Los Angeles Angels during the sixth inning of a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Los Angeles Angels catcher Francisco Arcia can’t make the catch on a foul ball against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Oakland Athletics’ Ramon Laureano scores a run on a Marcus Semien double against the Los Angeles Angels during the sixth inning of a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Angels center fielder Michael Hermosillo makes a diving catch on a ball hit by Oakland’s Franklin Barreto during the seventh inning of Thursday’s game in Oakland. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)The Angels’ Francisco Arcia went from playing catcher to pitcher during Thursday’s blowout loss to the A’s in Oakland. The A’s won 21-3. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Oakland Athletics’ Nick Martini, left, rounds the bases as Los Angeles Angels catcher Francisco Arcia, who was pitching, stands on the mound after giving up a two-run home run during the seventh inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. Oakland won 21-3. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)The Angels’ Francisco Arcia (37) smiles as he rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run against the Oakland Athletics during the ninth inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. Oakland won 21-3. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)Oakland Athletics’ Khris Davis (2) slides past Los Angeles Angels catcher Francisco Arcia (37) to score on a run on a single by Stephen Piscotty during the fourth inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)NextShow Caption1 of 25Oakland Athletics’ Khris Davis (2) slides past Los Angeles Angels catcher Francisco Arcia (37) to score on a run on a single by Stephen Piscotty during the fourth inning in a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)ExpandOAKLAND — The Angels’ record-breaking bad day, one that ended with a catcher making history as a pitcher, started with Matt Shoemaker still trying to find himself.Shoemaker, whose recent seasons have been marked by issues of health and ineffectiveness, gave up five runs and didn’t make it out of the third inning, sending the Angels on their way to a 21-3 loss to the loss to the Oakland A’s on Thursday afternoon.It was the most lopsided loss in franchise history and tied the club record for most runs allowed. The last three were allowed by catcher Francisco Arcia, who chucked 65 mph “fastballs” over the plate for two innings.Then Arcia hit a homer in the top of the ninth, becoming the first player in big league history to pitch, catch and homer in the same game. “I’ll take whatever positive I can,” Arcia said.Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.It did little to ease the frustration elsewhere in the Angels clubhouse, particularly with what Shoemaker called an “atrocious” performance.Four starts into his return from nearly two seasons missed due to injury, Shoemaker has scuffled since pitching five scoreless innings on Sept. 3.He gave up three runs in each of his next two starts – although with an encouraging eight strikeouts in 4-2/3 innings the last time out – before Thursday’s outing.Shoemaker pitched a perfect first inning, with two strikeouts. In the second, he worked around two walks but did not allow a run. 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first_imgOnly the basketball gods know what might be in store Sunday afternoon, when the Clippers and Mavericks face off again for Game 4 of their Western Conference first-round playoff series.Will Luka Doncic’s sprained left ankle be healthy enough to permit him to play? About 24 hours before tipoff, Dallas had no idea; the MRI machine in the bubble wasn’t cooperating.How about Paul George’s shots, will they start to fall? His Clippers teammates believe so – but they also recognize that slumps happen; it’s basketball.For all the unknown variables at play, the facts are that after L.A. fended off the Mavericks 130-122 on Friday, the second-seeded Clippers are in control with a 2-1 series lead. What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum Doc Rivers wasn’t going to concern himself over Doncic’s injury, he said after Friday’s game, in which last season’s Rookie of the Year turned his ankle guarding Leonard in the third quarter and tried to play in a stint that lasted only 2:58 of the fourth quarter.“I’ve been on both sides of that,” Rivers said. “I don’t worry about it. I just keep coaching my team. Listen, it’s just part of the game.”So too are shooting slumps, no matter how ill-timed.After shooting 10 for 22 in the series-opening win Monday, George is 7 for 33 (21.2%) from the field in the past two games, including 4 for 17 in Wednesday’s 127-114 loss. The Clippers’ second star also is 3 for 18 from 3-point range in the past two games, when otherwise he’s averaging 9.5 rebounds and 4.5 assists.“I’m obviously struggling shooting, struggling scoring the ball,” said George, who, in 22 playoff games during the past four postseasons, averaged 27 points per game on 42.4% shooting.In the six seeding games he played inside the intimate Walt Disney World Resort gyms, George was sizzling, averaging 25.5 points per game and making 48.1% of his shots from the floor and 50% from deep.“It is what it is,” George continued Friday. “It didn’t affect us winning tonight, so I am going to continue to just get lost in the game. Whether I make shots or miss shots, I’m going to continue to be aggressive.”The scoring will come, George’s coach and teammates concurred.“He’s one of the best players in the world,” said Landry Shamet, who got going Friday with a career-playoff high 18 points on 7-of-13 shooting. “Nobody is fretting, nobody is worried at all. He’s a bad dude, and when it comes, it comes. That’s just how it goes; it’s basketball.”Related Articles “Yeah,” Rivers said, “I’m not worried about it. He’s a great player. He’s human. I can guarantee you this: He has not forgotten how to shoot.”Rivers’ suggested George’s final attempt Friday, when he carved out space to score a layup over the 7-foot-3 Kristaps Porzingis, will bode well going forward.“(He) saw the ball go in,” Rivers said. “Amazing how the basketball gods (work). That’s probably going to be a carryover for the next game for him.”Clippers (2-1) vs. Mavericks (1-2)When: 12:30 p.m. SundayWhere: Walt Disney World Resort, Lake Buena Vista, FloridaTV: ABC Game 4 photos: Luka Doncic, Mavs shock Clippers in overtime center_img Kawhi Leonard, the two-time NBA Finals MVP, has scored 100 points over these first three games, fewer than only Donovan Mitchell’s 107 in these playoffs. No Clipper has ever matched that scoring output in his first three postseason appearances.It’s also true that the best-of-seven series has felt different without Clippers willful guard Patrick Beverley, who remains doubtful with a strained left calf, and that it will feel starkly different still if Doncic can’t play.“I believe this is going to be, most likely, a game-time decision-type of situation,” Mavs coach Rick Carlisle said, via Zoom, early Saturday afternoon. “But I don’t know, I can’t tell you the exact timing … we’re trying to get him an MRI, there was an issue with the MRI machine here and they’re trying to get that resolved, so that we can get the MRI done.”Otherwise, Carlisle said, “We’ve gotta measure a lot of things relative to how he’s feeling, what the diagnostic test looks like and what our trainers feel. I wish I knew right now, but I don’t. Tonight’s a big night in terms of how he feels in the morning.”Timing might be on the Clippers’ side, because Sunday’s 12:30 p.m. start (3:30 p.m. in Lake Buena Vista, Florida) will present an even shorter turnaround than what the teams have experienced so far, when they’ve played every other night at 9 p.m., their time. Clippers’ Paul George: ‘If I make shots, this series could be a little different’ For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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