August 3, 2021
  • 10:00 pm Eveready East Africa Limited (EVRD.ke) HY2010 Interim Report
  • 9:59 pm Mauritian Eagle Insurance Co. Limited (MEI.mu) 2011 Abridged Report
  • 9:58 pm ARM Cement Limited (ARM.ke) HY2011 Interim Report
  • 9:57 pm Medtech Holdings Limited (MMDZ.zw) 2012 Abridged Report
  • 9:55 pm DN Tyre & Rubber Plc (DUNLOP.ng) 2013 Annual Report

first_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena City College is pleased to welcome the new dean of Academic Affairs, Ofelia Arellano. In her new position, she will participate in the curriculum development process in cooperation with the PCC Academic Senate; assess needs for new instructional programs and services; and assist in the development, implementation and evaluation of new instructional and learning assistance and student development programs.“I was extremely impressed with the historical background of PCC and the number of accomplished individuals who are alumni like Jaime Escalante and Jackie Robinson,” Arellano said. “PCC has also established impressive priorities and strategies that all focus on access and student success. This was appealing and factored into my decision to select PCC as an institution that matched my personal values and educational philosophy.”Arellano comes to PCC from Santa Barbara City College, where she served as vice president in the Continuing Education Division. There, she helped to plan, organize and direct district-wide instructional programs and student services. She also established a Spanish literacy program for immigrants in collaboration with the Mexican Consulate and Mexico’s Department of Education, and helped raise scholarship and discretionary funds for non-credit students and programs.Arellano earned her Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she studied counseling psychology. She has worked in the education field for more than 20 years, and now she is bringing her broad and diverse areas of expertise to PCC. Subscribe EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Herbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTips From A Professional Stylist On How To Look Stunning In 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment Community Newscenter_img Community News Business: Marketing Column Ofelia Arellano Assumes Role as PCC’s Dean of Academic Affairs By Juan F. Gutierrez , Director, Public Relations Published on Friday, January 11, 2013 | 4:45 pm More Cool Stuff Business News Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Earnings Statements Mortgage Servicers Ocwen Financial Profits 2015-04-30 Brian Honea Subscribe About Author: Brian Honea in Daily Dose, Featured, News Ocwen Reports Preliminary Net Income of $34 Million for Q1 Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: Credit Trends in Mortgage Insurance Drive Strong Q1 for Radian Next: DS News Webcast: Friday 5/1/2015 Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago April 30, 2015 759 Views center_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Share Save  Print This Post Ocwen Financial rebounded from a tumultuous 2014 that included legal troubles, multi-million dollar settlements, ratings downgrades, and several multi-billion sales of MSR portfolios with a preliminary Q1 2015 net income of $34 million, or $0.27 per share, according to an announcement from the company on Thursday afternoon.Atlanta-based Ocwen, one of the largest non-bank mortgage servicers in the nation, posted a total write-down of $546 million for the full year of 2014. In Q1 2014, the company reported a total net income of $60.5 million, or $0.43 per share. The company’s Q1 2015 preliminary revenue of $510.4 million represents a 7 percent year-over-year decline, and preliminary income from operations dropped from $202.1 million in Q1 2014 down to $132.1 million in Q1 2015. Meanwhile, preliminary cash flow from operating activities for Q1 totaled $323 million, a year-over-year increase of 65 percent.”I am proud of what we have accomplished as far as managing the business through this difficult transition period. We made great progress on our asset sale strategy, have returned to profitability and continue to generate substantial operating cash flow,” said Ron Faris, President and CEO of Ocwen. “However, I am not satisfied with only making $34 million in the quarter. We intend to do better.”Factors that influenced Ocwen’s pre-tax income during Q1 were as follows: A gain of $26.9 million from an MSR sale of Freddie Mac performing loans with an unpaid principal balance of $9.1 billion, a gain of $12.9 million on a sale of legacy performing and non-performing whole loans; an impairment charge of $17.8 million due to the fair market value decline of government-insured MSRs (which was primarily the result of the FHA lowering the mortgage insurance premiums by 50 basis points early in the year; monitor costs of $9.0 million; strategic advisor expenses and fair value-related charges of $8.4 million and $8.3 million, respectively. Also during Q1, Ocwen’s lending segment was responsible for generating $16.0 million of pre-tax income.The results Ocwen announced Thursday were preliminary; the company announced that it plans to file its 2014 Form 10-K and Q1 2015 Form 10-Q on or before May 29. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: Earnings Statements Mortgage Servicers Ocwen Financial Profits Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Ocwen Reports Preliminary Net Income of $34 Million for Q1last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgResearchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have developed a robotic device made from DNA that could potentially seek out specific cell targets within a complex mixture of cell types and deliver important molecular instructions, such as telling cancer cells to self-destruct. Inspired by the mechanics of the body’s own immune system, the technology might one day be used to program immune responses to treat various diseases. The research findings appear today in Science.Using the DNA origami method, in which complex 3-D shapes and objects are constructed by folding strands of DNA, Shawn Douglas, a Wyss Technology Development Fellow, and Ido Bachelet, a former Wyss postdoctoral fellow who is now an assistant professor in the Faculty of Life Sciences and the Nano-Center at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, created a nanosized robot in the form of an open barrel whose two halves are connected by a hinge. The DNA barrel, which acts as a container, is held shut by special DNA latches that can recognize and seek out combinations of cell-surface proteins, including disease markers. When the latches find their targets, they reconfigure, causing the two halves of the barrel to swing open and expose its contents, or payload.  The container can hold various types of payloads, including specific molecules with encoded instructions that can interact with specific cell surface signaling receptors.Douglas and Bachelet used this system to deliver instructions, which were encoded in antibody fragments, to two different types of cancer cells — leukemia and lymphoma. In each case, the message to the cell was to activate its “suicide switch” — a standard feature that allows aging or abnormal cells to be eliminated. And because leukemia and lymphoma cells speak different languages, the messages were written in different antibody combinations.This programmable nanotherapeutic approach was modeled on the body’s own immune system in which white blood cells patrol the bloodstream for any signs of trouble. These infection fighters are able to home in on specific cells in distress, bind to them, and transmit comprehensible signals to direct them to self-destruct. The DNA nanorobot emulates this level of specificity through the use of modular components in which different hinges and molecular messages can be switched in and out of the underlying delivery system, much as different engines and tires can be placed on the same chassis. The programmable power of this type of modularity means the system has the potential to one day be used to treat a variety of diseases.“We can finally integrate sensing and logical computing functions via complex, yet predictable, nanostructures — some of the first hybrids of structural DNA, antibodies, aptamers, and metal atomic clusters — aimed at useful, very specific targeting of human cancers and T-cells,” said George Church, a Wyss core faculty member and professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, who is principal investigator on the project.Because DNA is a natural biocompatible and biodegradable material, DNA nanotechnology is widely recognized for its potential as a delivery mechanism for drugs and molecular signals. But there have been significant challenges to its implementation, such as what type of structure to create; how to open, close, and reopen that structure to insert, transport, and deliver a payload; and how to program this type of nanoscale robot.By combining several novel elements for the first time, the new system represents a significant advance in overcoming these implementation obstacles. For instance, because the barrel-shaped structure has no top or bottom lids, the payloads can be loaded from the side in a single step — without having to open the structure first and then reclose it. Also, while other systems use release mechanisms that respond to DNA or RNA, the novel mechanism used here responds to proteins, which are more commonly found on cell surfaces and are largely responsible for transmembrane signaling in cells. Finally, this is the first DNA-origami-based system that uses antibody fragments to convey molecular messages — a feature that offers a controlled and programmable way to replicate an immune response or develop new types of targeted therapies.“This work represents a major breakthrough in the field of nanobiotechnology as it demonstrates the ability to leverage recent advances in the field of DNA origami pioneered by researchers around the world, including the Wyss Institute’s own William Shih, to meet a real-world challenge, namely killing cancer cells with high specificity,” said Wyss Institute Founding Director Donald Ingber. Ingber is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Vascular Biology Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, and professor of bioengineering at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “This focus on translating technologies from the laboratory into transformative products and therapies is what the Wyss Institute is all about.”last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgGhana Football Association president Kwesi Nyantakyi has retained his seat as the West African Football Union president after winning a keenly contested election on Tuesday, during the body’s congress at Movenpick hotel in Accra. Nyantakyi, 46, amassed 4 votes to retain his post while his main challenger, Niger’s Djibrilla Hima Hamidou managed 3 votes.“I’m happy to have another opportunity to lead football in our zone,” Nyantakyi told reporters. “It wasn’t an easy election but my good works over the years proved vital and I hope to continue with what we started and improve on where we fell short in the past years. “Thanks to everyone who voted and to those who didn’t vote for me. My promise is that football will continue to grow in our part of the world and our impact will effect changes in people’s life,” he added. Nyantakyi initially took over from Nigerian Amos Adamu on an interim basis in April 2011 after Adamu was suspended by Fifa, before Nyantakyi was duly elected months later. Wafu zone B is made up of countries including Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Nigeria, Togo, Benin, Niger and Burkina Faso. –last_img read more

READ MORE