April 13, 2021
  • 7:42 am The Groove Orient Share Spring Tour Dates Including Fools Paradise Throwdown
  • 7:41 am GRiZ Announced As Headliner On Northern Nights Music Festival Lineup
  • 7:36 am Dead & Company Debuts ‘Box Of Rain’ At Rockin’ Cincinnati Show [Full Audio/Video]
  • 7:36 am Club Venues In Many Major Cities Added To Ticketmaster’s Voucher Redemption Program
  • 7:33 am Lettuce LOCKN’ Set And ‘Let Us Play’ Documentary To Be Broadcast Tonight On Qello

first_imgLast July, for a second consecutive sell out year, thousands of attendees had the festival experience of a lifetime along the banks of the Eel River on the Mendocino / Humboldt County Line. Northern Nights Music Festival returns to the historic Cook’s Valley Campground July 15­17, 2016 behind California’s picturesque Redwood Curtain.Northern Nights has hit the ground running in 2016, in preparation for the 4th year of #NNMF. The festival announced GRiZ as their main headliner, with performances from Amon Tobin/Two Fingers DJ Set, Claptone Immortal Live, The Knocks, Troyboi and more! You can check out the full lineup below, and head to the NNMF website for tickets and more information.Check out some stunning shots from Northern Nights, courtesy of Jesse Rather:last_img

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first_imgOn Saturday, the beloved tribute act Pink Talking Fish closed out their spring tour with a triumphant hometown show at Boston, Massachusetts’ Paradise Rock Club. The performance saw the band in truly proper form, paying tribute to Pink Floyd, Talking Heads, and Phish with a hugely energetic show. To celebrate the band’s homecoming, the group had a number of special surprises in store for the Boston crowd, including sit-ins from Russ Lawton of Trey Anastasio Band and Dave Grippo and Carl Gerhard of Giant Country Horns.Russ Lawton, most recently, has been on tour with Trey Anastasio and bassist Tony Markellis as Trey Anastasio Trio. Following longtime Trey Anastasio Band keyboardist Ray Paczkowski’s surgery to remove a brain tumor, the scheduled Trey Anastasio Band spring tour was canceled, instead replaced with a trio tour, marking the ensemble’s first full run since 1999. Furthermore, the trio tour was particularly timely given that the shows coincided with the 20th anniversary of Trey Anastasio Trio’s famed “8 Foot Florescent Tubes” show at Winooski, Vermont’s Higher Ground on April 17th.As for Giant Country Horns, the horn group has been a longstanding staple with Phistory, with the group joining Phish on the road for what was affectionately known as “The Horns Tour” in 1991. Alto saxophonist, Dave “The Truth” Grippo holds the honor of being one of Vermont quartet’s most frequent guests on stage, though his Giant Country Horns bandmates like Carl Gerhard and Russ Remington have similarly graced stages with Phish multiple times.Russ Lawton was the first sit-in of the evening, joining Pink Talking Fish for a take on a song he wrote with Trey Anastasio, the fan-favorite “Sand”—while Lawton was featured during the number, Dave Grippo made his first appearance of the evening, coming out to play cowbell for the tune. During Pink Talking Fish’s second set, Grippo returned to the stage, this time with his Giant Country Horn bandmate, trumpeter Carl Gerhard, for renditions of “Cavern” and “Julius”.You can watch a video of Pink Talking Fish’s energetic rendition of Talking Head’s “Psycho Killer” below, which was recorded by Renee Gould and provided by Pink Talking Fish, and stay tuned for more videos of the standout collaborations from Pink Talking Fish’s spring tour closer! [Video: Renee Gould via Pink Talking Fish]Setlist: Pink Talking Fish | Paradise Rock Club | Boston, MA | 5/12/2018Set 1: Divided Sky > Whipping Post > Divided Sky, Uh Oh Love Comes To Town > Happiest Days Of Our Lives > Another Brick In The Wall Part 2 > Limb By Limb > Another Brick In The Wall Part 3 > Psycho Killer > Us And Them*, Sand**Set 2: Time Loves A Hero > Cities, Mother, Cavern*** > Julius***%, Life During Wartime% > Pigs (3 Different Ones)%% > Carini > Pigs (3 Different Ones) > Once In A LifetimeE: Harry Hood* w/ Waste tease**w/ Russ Lawton on drums and Dave Grippo on cowbell***w/ Dave Grippo on saxophone and Carl Gerhardt on trumpet%w/ Entrance Of The Gladiators tease%%w/ Bathtub Gin teaselast_img read more

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first_img Got any Grey Poupon? Erin Washington ’11 of the Crimson Key Society offers window-side directions to the flood of families. Move-in day On top of things The Harvard Class of 2014 struts their stuff in these custom hats, made especially for them. Photo ops Who wouldn’t strike a pose? Outside of Johnston Gate, Kyle Kruger (left) of Sugarland, Texas, charms the photographer (her mom). Mobile home Terrance Moore ’14 (right) moves from Atlanta into Straus Hall with a little help from his father, Melvin, and this cart. Fresh-faced Moving is always stressful, and a smile is always welcome. Here, Stoughton North proctor Devon Wessman-Smerdon meets and greets incoming students. Hardwood floors, exposed brick… Not a South End condo description, but a Stoughton dorm! Chelsea Celistan (center) and roommate Danielle Lussi (left) have lots of decorating to do. Stephanie Mitchell, Kris Snibbe, Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographers College Dean Evelynn Hammonds officially welcomed freshmen and their families to Harvard Thursday (Aug. 26) during a ceremony at Sanders Theatre, and vowed to “to help prepare students for the transitions to come and move them from a position of receiving and learning knowledge, to serving, teaching and leading others.”The standing-room-only crowd filled the historic hall and cheered as the College band kicked off the afternoon’s program — part of Opening Days 2010 — with a rendition of “Ten Thousand Men of Harvard” and other traditional school fight songs. Soon after, Hammonds took to the podium and lauded the weather, suddenly warm and sunny after “four solid days of rain.”The dean described her role at Harvard, saying that it was her responsibility to “anticipate the challenges and envision the possibilities of Harvard College and to leverage every available resource of this great institution to realize our full potential to shape tomorrow’s leaders — your sons and daughters — and to challenge them intellectually, socially, and morally.” She pledged to promote the development of the University’s undergraduates.“I accepted the job of dean of Harvard College to give my very best energy to making this institution help all students reach their fullest potential,” she said, adding that, as the University’s mission states, “Education at Harvard should liberate students to explore, to create, to challenge, and to lead.”Hammonds also sought to reassure parents anxious about leaving their offspring in Harvard’s care.“I hope you’ll trust that many of us are working hard — including me — to ensure that your sons and daughters are well supported here at the College,” she said. “It is our job, and we all take this responsibility very seriously.”Thomas A. Dingman, dean of freshmen, followed Hammonds’ remarks with some words about the challenges facing families and students. He told a story about Harvard alumnus and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, who once boarded a train, only to find he’d lost his ticket. When the conductor recognized Holmes and said that the jurist could simply mail in his ticket when it turned up, Holmes replied, “You don’t understand. I don’t know where I’m going!” Dingman said new students too would have moments when they didn’t know where they were going. He promised that Harvard would do its best to guide them.Margaret McKenna, a psychiatrist at Harvard University Health Services and an alumna of the College, wrapped up the program with advice gathered from 20 years of working with students. She told parents they would likely experience a range of emotions — from relief to grief — as they dropped their children off at school and urged them to “remain nurturing while promoting ever-greater autonomy” for them.“Be available,” she told mothers and fathers. “Be realistic. Don’t panic.Be patient. And listen, listen, listen.”New Harvard parents Deborah and Francis Burke of Walpole, Mass., appreciated McKenna’s remarks.“It’s always helpful to be reminded to take a step back and let your child work through things,” said Deborah. “These are important years for a child to develop intellectually and academically.”Describing himself as an “empty nester as of 20 minutes ago,” Francis Burke said he was excited about the opportunities Harvard would offer his son, Steven.“The sky’s the limit,” he said. Is Matt Damon on there? First-year roommates Chelsea Celistan (left) and Danielle Lussi pore over a list of their room’s former tenants. Drifters, vagabonds California girl Namrata Anand (left) sits with her cousin Kausalya and a boatload of luggage outside of her new home, Matthews Hall. Justin Ide/ Harvard Staff Photographer Shaking hands Catherine Gu ’14 arrives at Thayer Hall for the first time and meets Dean of Harvard College Evelynn Hammonds. Her parents, Kenan (from left) and Yancui, and her sister, Amanda, look on in excitement. All for one … And 1-4 all. Who doesn’t love a clever balloon message? Empty nests Dean of Harvard College Evelynn Hammonds talks with and charms the proud parents. Of presidential priority Harvard President Drew Faust picks up some energy-efficient fluorescent bulbs from Chandan Lodha ’13 (from left), Annie Baldwin ’13, Annie DeAngelo ’12, and Kurt Tsuo ’11 of the Resource Efficiency Program.last_img read more

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first_imgScholars who work with historical objects may think of those objects as worlds apart from emerging technology, but students in two courses — one offered through the Committee on Medieval Studies and Harvard Divinity School, the other through the Program in General Education — harnessed the power of both to curate exhibits now on display.The exhibits reflect new forms of research, teaching, and learning. One is presented in Houghton Library with an online companion exhibit in progress, and the other consists of virtual galleries built with digital collections from Harvard’s libraries and museums.Students in “Scrolls in the Middle Ages,” a seminar course led by Morton B. Knafel Professor of Music Thomas Forrest Kelly and John H. Morison Professor of Practice in Latin and Romance Languages Beverly Mayne Kienzle, undertook a semester-long project to prepare the University’s collection of medieval scrolls for display in Houghton’s Edison and Newman Room. Their show, which features 15 scrolls, runs through Aug. 16. It is free and open to the public.At the outset of the course, the students met with Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts William Stoneman to view the scrolls and choose one to research in-depth.An 800- to 900-year-old-scroll is susceptible to damage if rolled and unrolled multiple times, so after their initial visits, the students relied on digitized copies to inspect writing, images, and composition.Classics concentrator Rebecca Frankel ’15 helped prepare MS Lat 198, a small scroll that contains a secular poem written in Latin. “It’s pretty difficult to see, even when you’re standing close to it,” she said. “The fact that they were able to digitize this was really helpful because we were able to zoom in really closely and make out words that we otherwise wouldn’t be able to.”Kienzle made clear the contributions of Houghton staff. “We can’t emphasize how much the library did in making this available so the students could do what they did.”The digitized scrolls are available through the Harvard Library’s Page Delivery Service and will be part of the class’ forthcoming online exhibit.“Digital is helping more people have an experience of the material culture of the Middle Ages,” Kienzle added. “It’s fantastic.”Next-generation digital images are made using archive-quality, high-resolution photography that precisely reproduces the color of the original object on-screen. The images show close detail, such as brushstrokes and texture. They are presented as panoramic, stitched-together graphics, rather than pages, so that students can focus on particular areas but also see the larger context of a piece.Library Technology Services is collaborating with HarvardX to enhance annotation and translation in image viewing, and to raise virtual interaction to the level of actual. The new technology is being introduced in classrooms, and will also be featured in an upcoming Harvard massive online open course, “The History of the Book,” which Kelly will co-teach.Some members of the course were using the tools for the first time, but were able to learn from the varied technical and academic backgrounds of their classmates.“Each of the students has found out that any single question you ask of a medieval object can expand to fill the universe because everything is connected to everything else and it turns out there’s a huge amount to know and huge amount that we have all learned,” Kelly said.One of those questions came from Emerson Morgan, a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in historical musicology. As he prepared MS Typ II, which is longer than its display case, he deliberated over which section to show. “It raises interesting questions about stories and how they are chopped or parsed,” Morgan said. The answer helps explain why scrolling styles on the Web are sometimes revisited and revised.Across campus, students in Professor Daniel Smail’s “Making the Middle Ages” were exploring similar connections between the past and the present. In Smail’s General Ed course, the first assignment was to search campus for items reminiscent of the medieval era and post pictures of the findings — crests from Harvard’s residential Houses, images from “Game of Thrones,” the restaurant Medieval Times — on a Tumblr blog.From there, the students visited Harvard’s museum and library collections to examine a selection of objects from the fifth to 15th centuries. Each student selected one item to closely study its context, provenance, and purpose, and then worked with a group to fit the objects together within a common theme. Those commonalities became the basis for virtual galleries built with the Web publishing platform Omeka.Indrani Das ’16, a concentrator in human developmental and regenerative biology, worked with her group to arrange their findings around idea dissemination and globalization. The classmates wanted to avoid organizing the exhibit by where the objects were found, so they focused on revealing recurring influences on Europe from the Middle East and Africa. The exhibit, “Tales of Transfer,” won a class competition for best gallery.“What Professor Smail tried to get a lot of us to understand is that we’re not so different from the people that lived during the Middle Ages,” Das said. “If anything, combining the medieval history with modern technology that I’ve never used in any of my classes, let alone a history class, served to get rid of the dichotomy that we’d originally set up based on misconceptions that we grew up with.”The same urge against dichotomies — and toward connection — was on Kelly’s mind as he reflected on the success of his course.“I think this same sort of thing can be done at Harvard in many, many other ways just by changing the nouns: You just change the word ‘scroll’ to — I don’t know what — ‘reliquary’ or ‘leather bookbinding’ or ‘Native American headgear.’ … This has for me been a really interesting experiment in how to use tangible objects at Harvard to relate people to each other and to relate those collections to the intellectual and cultural history not just here, but throughout the world.”last_img read more

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first_imgJakarta Governor Anies Baswedan has decided to extend the period of large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) to the end of June as Indonesia’s capital city enters the transition phase with gradual easing plans in place for several sectors.He explained that the decision was taken after considering that most parts of the capital were generally now “green or yellow zones” for COVID-19 cases, although he admitted that some community units (RW) were still seeing a growing number of cases.“We and the COVID-19 task force have decided to extend the PSBB period in Jakarta and have determined that June will be the transition phase,” Anies said during a press conference that was livestreamed on the city administration’s YouTube channel on Thursday. During the transition period, Jakarta will allow houses of worship to resume activities but only at half capacity. The city administration will also allow mobility of public and private vehicles starting Friday.Other sectors allowed to open include offices, shops, restaurants, factories, retailers and city-owned small to medium businesses but only with half capacity in the second week of June, while non-food businesses in markets and shopping centers will be allowed to open in the third week.Recreational parks, zoos, sport facilities, museums, libraries, beaches and other public facilities will also be allowed to open gradually.Read also: COVID-19: Jakarta extends PSBB through RamadanAnies said that during the transition period, an ‘emergency brake policy’ would also be in place to stop the reopening of the various sectors if health protocols failed and cases surged.Since the first cases were detected in March, Jakarta has reported 7,690 COVID-19 cases, with 523 fatalities and 2,607 recoveries as of Thursday.The city administration began imposing the PSBB on April 10, closing schools and religious places, restricting people’s mobility and encouraging companies to apply a work-from-home policy, and has since extended the restrictions three times.Topics :last_img read more

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first_imgThe balcony is a great place to watch the sunset.The two other upstairs bedrooms have built-in robes and the main bathroom has a bathtub and separate shower. The home has airconditioning and fans throughout as well as plenty of storage space, including a storage area in the double lockup garage. This home is in the Green Gate release of North Lakes and is close to childcare centres, schools, Ikea, the local golf club and the Westfield shopping precinct. The kitchen has plenty of work and storage space.More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019The open plan living area is on the ground floor with lounge, dining and kitchen spaces opening to the outdoor entertaining area. The kitchen has an island bench, plenty of cupboard space and stainless steel appliances. The bigger downstairs bedroom, with walk-in robe and easy access to the downstairs bathroom and powder room, could be a guest room while the second bedroom could be used as a study. The laundry is tucked away off the double garage and has external access.Upstairs, a family room opens to a covered balcony with views over the golf course. The master bedroom has a walk-in wardrobe, balcony access and an ensuite with shower made for two, and double basins. The home at 68 Elkington Circuit, North Lakes is perfect for families.A TWO-storey home built for entertaining is on the  market in North Lakes.Harcourts North Lakes marketing agent Naomi Carter said 68 Elkington Circuit was a home that ticked all the boxes for buyers looking for a family property. “This delightful family home has all the space a family could need and extra room for the guests,” she said.The house sits on a 569sq m block with side access and plenty of room for the children’s toys and even the boat. last_img read more

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first_imgChris and Lou Williams loved renovating their Ashgrove property so much, they’ve decided to do another. Photo: Annette DewFriends told 31-year-old Chris Williams and his wife, Lou, 30, they were crazy, but the couple have loved renovating.“Everyone hates it, and we didn’t,” Mr Williams said.“People usually shake their heads and say, ‘Why are you doing it to yourselves?’”The pair spent 15 months and about $1 million creating their future family home at 54 Moulton St, Ashgrove, before deciding it was too hard to stop at just one venture. The home is a comfortable mix of contemporary and colonial.“It was never on the cards during the process that we’d sell it, it was just at the end of it we said, ‘Well that was really fun, we kind of want to do it again!’”Because they intended to settle in the house, Mr Williams said they didn’t skimp on the work which resulted in a stunning five-bedroom, three-bathroom design masterpiece.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor1 hour ago The outdoor entertaining space is inviting … and very hip.When asked about their favourite spaces, Chris said they love the central living areas, but have different spots for downtime.“My place is the media room downstairs where I can relax, have a beer and watch sport while Lou’s space is upstairs. She got a bedroom that she’s set up as a sewing room so she’s particularly drawn to that room.” No expense was spared in creating a beautiful family home.A look through the home reveals a tip of the hat to the original cottage, combined with contemporary finishes such as polished concrete, architectural timber walls and ceilings, a dark-and-light colour palette, video security system and ducted airconditioning. There’s high-end architectural features throughout.Mr Williams said, however, the greatest thing about the home was its livability.“It just flows,” he said.The renovation is sure to be a hit with viewers too when it appears on the new lifestyle show, “Ready, Set, Reno” on September 10, on 9 Life.54 Moulton St, Ashgrove, will be auctioned today at noon by Josh Brown of Ray White New Farm.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclair or Facebook on Kieran Clair — journolast_img read more

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first_imgTo recall, a portion of WVMC’s medical/surgical ward went on a one-day lockdown on July 10 after a 13-year-old boy patient tested positive for COVID-19. “Nakahatag sang letter si Dr. Nicolo nga kon puede [ang mga patients] dira lang anay sa mga district hospitals. Kon indi gid masarangan kag kinahanglan gid nga i-refer sa Western, may makeshift tent sa sagwa nga maka-accommodate,” said Abello. Meanwhile, Dr. Joseph Dean Nicolo, chief of WVMC, issued an advisory to the Provincial Health Office and district hospitals in Iloilo province and other parts of Region 6 to suspend the issuance of referrals. Of the three infected personnel, one was a nurse assigned in a non-COVID emergency room, one was a radiologist and another was an institutional worker, according to Dr. Stephanie Abello, chief pathologist of the WVMC sub-national laboratory where the region’s COVID-19 tests are conducted. “Once ma-decontaminate ang mga areas, mabalik man               ila operation,” Abello added. She said makeshift tents were installed outside the WVMC to assure patients of continued medical care. Four areas of the hospital were immediately locked down on Wednesday to stop the virus from spreading. “Sa subong gina-trace kon diin gid ang source. Puede nga community acquired or sa patient,” Abello furthered. Also, more than a week ago, a portion of the hospital’s orthopedic ward was locked down after a 72-year-old male patient from Igbaras, Iloilo was found infected with COVID-19.center_img Over 51 contacts of the three WVMC personnel have so far been traced and specimens were collected from them for analysis. Abello said they temporarily sealed off the St. Anthony ward, St. Augustine ward, portions of the non-COVID emergency room and radiology department to allow decontamination and restrict movement while contract tracing is ongoing. She disclosed that the hospital has yet to determine the source of infection of the three cases. People walk past the front of Western Visayas Medical Center’s emergency room in Mandurriao, Iloilo City on Wednesday. Some portions of the hospital went on lockdown after three workers tested positive for coronavirus disease 2019. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN Abello clarified that notwithstanding the lockdown, the hospital remains in operation. ILOILO – Two healthcare workers and an employee of the Western Visayas Medical Center (WVMC) in Mandurriao district tested positive for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). COVID-19 is the infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus. This new virus and disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China in December 2019./PNlast_img read more

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first_imgFranklin County, In.— Deputies from the Franklin County Sheriff’s Department believe distracted driving was the cause of a Sunday evening crash.A report from the sheriff’s department says a 17-year-old female was eastbound on Wolf Creek Road near the intersection of Blue Creek Road around 6:30 when she drove off the road and struck a tree. The vehicle caught fire following the crash. Evidence at the scene suggests the girl may have been distracted by a cell phone.The 17-year-old Brookville resident refused treatment at the scene.last_img

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first_imgMildred F. “Frankie” Hampton, 90, Greensburg, passed away on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at the Our Hospice Inpatient Facility in Columbus.Born, July 17, 1927 in Greensburg, Indiana, he was the daughter of William Russell and Ethelene (Powers) Pool.Mildred graduated from Greensburg high School in 1945.  She retired from Bohn Aluminum.  She was a former member of the Mt. Aerie Baptist Church in Letts.  She taught Bible School, Sunday School and was treasurer at the church for several years.  She then joined the First Baptist Church in Greensburg.She was married to Richard E. Hampton on July 2, 1945 and he preceded her in death on February 25, 2015.She is survived by three sons, Jim (Cheryle) Hampton, Greensburg, Joe (Patty) Hampton, Greensburg, David Russell Hampton, Greensburg; two daughters, Vickie (Bob) Gilmore, Greenwood, Becky Sue (Bruce) Myers, Greensburg; three sisters, Norma Peele, Greenwood, Rosemary King, Indianapolis, Sandra Sue Pool, Greensburg; 14 grandchildren, 33 great grandchildren, 4 great great grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death by her parents, husband; one brother, William Dale Pool; one sister, Betty J. Colon; one great granddaughter, Jessica Ferrell.Visitation will be from 11-1:00 p.m. Monday at the Porter-Oliger-Pearson Funeral Home in Greensburg.Funeral Services will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Monday, January 15, 2018 at the funeral home with Rev. Cliff Bunch officiating.Private burial will be held in the Mt. Aerie Cemetery in Letts.Memorials may be made to the Our Hospice of Southcentral Indiana.Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

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