June 14, 2021
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first_img BrazilAmericas Condemning abuses Judicial harassmentFreedom of expression Screen-shot (Gazeta do Povo website) Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns concerted attempts by judges in the southern state of Paraná to intimidate journalists with the Gazeta do Povo newspaper over a series of reports in February claiming that the state’s judges were receiving excessively large incomes. June 14, 2016 RSF decries judicial harassment of Gazeta do Povo journalists Organisation News Receive email alerts Related documents (Versão em português) Brasil: RSF repudia assédio judicial contra jornalistas da Gazeta do Povo PDF – 141.38 KB May 13, 2021 Find out more One of the reports, which have revived a debate about the ceilings on the salaries of state employees in Brazil, said that the average pay of Paraná’s judges and prosecutors was more than 20% over the legally stipulated ceiling in 2015.Clearly irritated by the reports, 35 Paraná judges and two Paraná prosecutors filed a total of 37 separate libel suits against five of the newspaper’s employees – reporters Chico Marés, Euclides Lucas Garcia and Rogério Galindo, the website technician Evandro Balmant, and computer graphics designer Guilherme Storck.The five journalists have so far had to travel a total of 6,000 km to attend hearings in 15 different municipalities in Paraná. The damages sought by all the plaintiffs total 1.4 million reais (more than 350,000 euros).Everything indicates that the judges are coordinating their lawsuits. Gazeta do Povo editor Leonardo Mendes says the suits are all virtually identical. In an audio-file leaked shortly after the reports were published, the head of the Paraná Judges’ Association, Frederico Mendes, can be heard confirming that the association will provide the judges with a model for their complaints.“We condemn this manoeuvre and these concerted reprisals by Paraná’s judges with the aim of intimidating the media,” said Emmanuel Colombié, the head of RSF’s Latin America desk. “The judicial procedure used by the judges who claim to have been libelled is tantamount to an instrument of persecution and censorship and constitutes a clear violation of freedom of information.”The Gazeta do Povo insists on the accuracy of its reporting and says all of its information came from the websites of the courts of law and the department of prosecutions. In an editorial, the newspaper said it regretted the fact that “the data in question caused so much embarrassment” and offered the judges space in the newspaper to respond to the allegations.The libel suits have nonetheless not been withdrawn. The newspaper has filed an appeal against the lawsuits with the Supreme Court, requesting that the libel suits should be heard outside Paraná. The request was denied.Brazil is ranked 104th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index. RSF_en Follow the news on Brazil April 27, 2021 Find out more News Help by sharing this information 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Alarm after two journalists murdered in Brazil RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America to go further Reports News BrazilAmericas Condemning abuses Judicial harassmentFreedom of expression April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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first_imgColumnsContempt- Anachronistic? V.Sudhish Pai28 July 2020 9:55 PMShare This – xThomas Paine said that in absolute states the king was the law; in free states the law must be, and is, the king. That is the desideratum of the rule of law which is the tribute paid by power to reason. Freedom of thought and expression including dissent is an important constitutional value which underpins a free and harmonious society. Justice Cardozo observed that freedom of speech…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThomas Paine said that in absolute states the king was the law; in free states the law must be, and is, the king. That is the desideratum of the rule of law which is the tribute paid by power to reason. Freedom of thought and expression including dissent is an important constitutional value which underpins a free and harmonious society. Justice Cardozo observed that freedom of speech is the matrix, the indispensible condition of nearly every other form of freedom. It is the wellspring of civilization. Without it liberty of thought would shrivel. The end result would be that the spirit of man would be mutilated and become enslaved. Discussion, debate and dissent are the very lifeblood of a democracy. Public criticism is essential to the working of democracy and this includes criticism of every institution and organ of the State. This freedom certainly takes within it the right to comment upon and criticise judgments as also the conduct and behaviour of judges. This is an indispensible part of the accountability process and is basic to our system. It is too sacrosanct to be stifled or interfered with. It is neither dangerous nor undesirable. The benefits of freedom of expression are strong in this context also, as David Pannick opines. Fair and robust criticism should not only be not unwelcome, but should be considered necessary, healthy and welcome. In his Lincoln Day Address in 1898, Justice Brewer perceptively said, “It is a mistake to suppose that the Supreme Court is either honoured or helped by being spoken of as beyond criticism. On the contrary, the life and character of the justices should be the object of constant watchfulness by all and its judgments subject to the freest criticism. The time is past in the history of the world when any living man or body of men can be set on a pedestal and decorated with a halo. True, many criticisms maybe, like their authors devoid of good taste; but better all sorts of criticism than no criticism at all. The moving waters are full of life and health, only in the still waters is stagnation and death.” [Government by Injunction, 15, Nat. Corp. Rep. 848, 849] The concept of independence of the judiciary takes queer forms. Judicial independence cannot be an alibi for stifling any talk or effort for setting the judicial house in order or to require people not to speak out against flagrant violation of judicial norms and behaviour. Much worse and more dangerous than any other form of arbitrariness is judicial arbitrariness. Justice Holmes refused to look upon any institution, including the Supreme Court as a Grand Lama and believed that every institution should earn respect through the test of truth. Justice Khanna observed with insight, “The strongest weapon in the armoury of the judiciary is its unsullied image, the esteem it evokes and the confidence it enjoys. Reference is sometimes made to the contempt of court power of the judges to command respect. This, perhaps, is not correct and is apt to mislead. Contempt of court, as observed by a great jurist (Lord Denning), ‘should not be used as a means to uphold our own dignity. This must rest on surer foundations. ……We must rely on our conduct itself to be its own vindication.” The power to punish for contempt is a safeguard not for judges as persons but for the functions they exercise. How relevant is the contempt law today in a free country where criticism of the judiciary is inevitable! Judges have vast powers. People cannot and will not remain silent or mute spectators about the exercise of such powers. Just as decisions of other branches incur criticism, judicial decisions and behaviour would also be amenable to the same.Contempt By ‘Scandalizing The Court’ : A Battle Of Perceptions On An Uneven Field One fails to understand as to what can be wrong or objectionable in discussing, commenting on and assessing a judge’s ability, performance and reputation. Unless and until this is done all talk about a great and independent judiciary is meaningless. If the conduct, behaviour and performance of Presidents and Prime Ministers and a whole host of persons at different levels in various fields can be commented on and criticized there is no reason whatsoever why the performance of judges and their conduct on and off the Bench cannot be. It ill befits anyone functioning under the Constitution and the law to claim any such immunity. Such claim is totally untenable. The judges are as human as anyone else under the sun. Indeed at the very beginning, in 1952, the Supreme Court had rightly and wisely cautioned judges never to be over sensitive to public criticism. We recall Seervai’s biting criticism of the majority opinion in the UP Assembly case (AIR 1965 SC 745) concluding that his discussion of the case showed it as “the most one-sided opinion and for the 6 judges to say that they would decide the matter ‘in a spirit of detached objective enquiry’ must appear hypocritical to the reader.” It was not frowned upon. Professor Glanville Williams’ criticism of a House of Lords judgment in language which was far from moderate was not only not penalised but was acknowledged and accepted and the earlier view changed in the later judgment.[see, R v. Shivpuri, 1987 AC 1] One cannot but refer to the Templeman approach. When the three Law Lords who delivered the majority judgment in the Spycatcher case [Att. Gen v. Guardian Newspaper, (1987) 3 All ER 316] were portrayed in a cartoon in a newspaper with the caption ‘Three Old Fools’, the Court took no notice or offence. Lord Templeman one of the majority judges remarked that they were three in the majority which was absolutely correct; they were not young by any standard and whether they were fools or otherwise was a matter of opinion or perception and that there was no contempt. Following the judgment in Bush vs. Gore, [531 US 98 (2000)] the American Supreme Court judges were severely criticised in the strongest and vilest terms by leading academicians in law journals. But no offence was taken or contempt initiated. Very recently, the Daily Mail published the photo of the three judges who issued the Brexit ruling [see, 2018 AC 61] captioned ‘Enemies of the People’. No notice was taken of it. The legendary Lord Denning, when something was thrown at him in court, did not take offence, leave alone action for contempt. Nearer home in the 1950s it would appear a shoe was flung at the dais in Justice Mahajan’s court in the Supreme Court. Justice Mahajan graciously said that he could understand the plight and agony of a losing litigant in the last court, but judges decide according to their light and one party has to win and the other lose. The judge asked the court master to ensure that no one left the court room bare footed. What grace and wisdom! Contempt of Court has been described as ‘The Proteus of the Legal World assuming an almost infinite diversity of forms.'[Joseph Moskovitz, Contempt of Injunctions Civil and Criminal, 43 Columbia Law Review 780 (1943)].The dilemma of the law of contempt arises because of the constitutional need to balance two great but occasionally conflicting principles-freedom of expression and fair and fearless justice. The key word is ‘justice’, not ‘judge’; the keynote thought is unobstructed public justice. Criticism, far from undermining public confidence in courts, would really enhance it. [see, Baradakanta Mishra v. Registrar AIR 1974 SC 710] The insightful observations of Justice Frankfurter in Bridges v. California 314 US 252 (1941) require to be always remembered: “Judges as persons, or courts as institutions, are entitled to no greater immunity from criticism than other persons or institutions. Just because the holders of judicial office are identified with the interests of justice they may forget their common human frailties and fallibilities. … Therefore judges must be kept mindful of their limitations and their ultimate responsibility by a vigorous stream of criticism expressed with candour however blunt. … Courts and judges must take their share of the gains and pains of discussion which is unfettered except by laws of libel, by self restraint and by good taste. … Nor should restrictions be permitted that cramp the feeling of freedom in the use of tongue or pen regardless of the temper or the truth of what may be uttered. … Since courts, although representing the law, are also sitting in judgment, as it were, on their own function in exercising their power to punish for contempt….it is always better to err on the side of tolerance and even disdainful indifference.” “Even if criticism of the court would have an effect on a judge’s action, the offence of scandalizing the judiciary must be abolished. …. Like other public servants judges should accept criticism as an occupational hazard. …. Because the judiciary enjoys a security of tenure rightly denied to politicians and unique to public servants, it is especially important that the judges should be subject to free and open criticism of the performance of their duties.”(David Pannick, Judges). “In theoretical terms criticism of the judiciary should almost certainly be treated as a form of political speech, and therefore enjoy the highest degree of legal protection.”(Eric Barendt, Freedom of Speech) One can do no better than refer to David Pannick and Judge Jerome Frank. “The judiciary is not the ‘least dangerous branch’ of government. Judges are not mere ‘lions under the throne.’ They send people to the prison and decide the scope and application of all manner of rights and duties with important consequences for individuals and for society. Because the judiciary has such a central role in the government of society, we should (in the words of Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes) ‘wash …. with cynical acid’ this aspect of public life. Unless and until we treat judges as fallible human beings whose official conduct is subject to the same critical analysis as that of other organs of government, judges will remain members of a priesthood who have great powers over the rest of the community, but who are otherwise isolated from them and misunderstood by them, to their mutual disadvantage. Some politicians, and a few jurists, urge that it is unwise or even dangerous to tell the truth about the judiciary. Judge Jerome Frank of the US Court of Appeals sensibly explained that he had “little patience with, or respect for, that suggestion. I am unable to conceive… that, in a democracy, it can ever be unwise to acquaint the public with the truth about the workings of any branch of government. It is wholly undemocratic to treat the public as children who are unable to accept the inescapable shortcomings of man-made institutions. … The best way to bring about the elimination of those shortcomings of our judicial system which are capable of being eliminated is to have all our citizens informed as to how that system now functions. It is a mistake, therefore, to try to establish and maintain, through ignorance, public esteem for our courts.” This was said over 70 years ago. How much more relevant it is today! The ‘dubious and controversial’ scandalizing the Court of illegitimate ancestry* and the Judges (Protection) Act, 1985 should be done away with. The entire law of criminal contempt is shrouded in uncertainty, its definition itself being vague. While one can accept the constraints imposed by the rule of law it is difficult to appreciate and accept ad hoc rules imposed as per the idiosyncrasies of individual judges. That is the very antithesis of the rule of law. All this is anachronistic and out of tune with the constitutional democratic ethos. The law regarding the scandalising the Court was got from England. In 2012 the Law Commission in UK found that there was a lot of abusive material directed against judges particularly online, much of it being too silly to be taken seriously. It was noted that the judges successfully used civil defamation law to penalise wrong doers. The contempt jurisdiction was not invoked. And it is significant that in 2013 England abolished the offence of scandalising the Court altogether. In many countries contempt jurisdiction is regarded as antiquated and is sparingly exercised. It is not used to silence comments on judges or legal matters. To speak of the judges’ ignorance of the law or of any improper conduct may be intemperate criticism, it cannot be contempt. That respect for the judiciary can be won by shielding judges from criticism is a misconception. Muzzling criticism against judges and judgments will not preserve public confidence in Courts. That is preserved and enhanced by the work the Court does- by its professional competence and moral integrity- and does not depend on what people are publicly allowed to say about it. It has been well said that when the Constitution gives the judiciary enormous power and responsibility to ensure that every institution and every citizen must strictly conform to law and to the standards of propriety, it is logical then to expect that the institution of the judiciary itself must be worthy of the full confidence of the people. [cf: Dr.P.C.Alexander: India in the New Millenium]. As Chief Justice Warren Burger warned, “A Court which is final and unreviewable needs more careful scrutiny than any other. Unreviewable power is the most likely to self indulge itself and the least likely to engage in dispassionate self analysis…. In a country like ours, no public institution, or the people who operate it, can be above public debate.” Justice Douglas remarked that judges are supposed to be “men of fortitude, able to thrive in a hardy climate, who should be able to shrug off contemptuous statements.”[Craig v. Harney, 331 US 367, 376 (1947)] Our courts have done so on many occasions. But there have also been instances of courts being over sensitive which is neither necessary nor desirable. That is nothing but contempt powers being designed to try to maintain a good public image for the judiciary. The attitude and ability to shrug off is what is required and commendable. In saying all this, the idea is only to endeavour to seek improvement. One is fortified by what Justice Holmes said: “I take it for granted that no hearer of mine will misinterpret what I have to say as the language of cynicism…I trust that no one will understand me to be speaking with disrespect of the law, because I criticize it so freely. I venerate the law and especially our system of law, as one of the vastest products of the human mind…But one may criticize even what one reveres. Law is the business to which my life is devoted and I should show less than devotion if I did not do what in me lies to improve it.”[The Path of the Law, Collected Legal Papers, 167,194 (1920)] *It has been described as dubious and controversial in Law of Contempt by Gordon Borie and Nigel Lowe, 3rd edition, Butterworths, Oxford (UK), 1996 p 331. It is dubious because it originates from a dictum of one judge, Justice J .E. Wilmot in John Wilkes case, ie, R vs Almon long ago in 1765 and controversial as the dictum was recorded in a judgment that was never delivered, but was published by the judge’s son after his father died. The judgment had been reserved after argument and when it was ready to be delivered it was found that the case against Wilkes was incorrectly titled and since the then procedural law did not permit an amendment unless agreed to by both parties, the entire case had to be abandoned. Thus it is based on a judgment never delivered in court in a case that had already abated!Views are personal only. Next Storylast_img read more

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first_imgjarun011/iStock(NEW YORK) — A global pandemic of the novel coronavirus has infected close to two million people worldwide. More than 128,000 people across the globe have died from COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks. Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected nation, with more than 609,000 diagnosed cases and at least 26,057 deaths. The number of cases in New York state alone is higher than in any single country outside the U.S. Here’s how the news is developing Wednesday. All times Eastern:11:35 a.m.: NYC grocery stores should require patrons wear masks: MayorIn hard-hit New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio says grocery stores should require customers to wear face coverings while shopping.“Every store has the right to put up that guidance and make it a requirement for entry into the store,” the mayor said, calling a face-covering requirement in grocery stores no different than “no shirt, no shoes, no service” signs.De Blasio said he would talk about loosening restrictions in New York City when there’s a steady drop in three key COVID-19 indicators for 10 to 14 days: those admitted to hospitals, those in intensive care units, and the percentage of people tested who are positive.The mayor said the number of patients admitted to hospitals and the number of people in ICUs have both slightly increased, while the percentage of people tested who are positive has made a small improvement.De Blasio on Wednesday also announced a $170 million investment to make sure no New Yorker goes hungry.Before the pandemic, 1.2 million New Yorkers were food insecure, including 1 in 5 children, the mayor said. Now, an estimated half-million New Yorkers have lost or will lose their jobs in the immediate future, he said.Since March 16, 4.5 million meals have been served to people in New York City, de Blasio said.Ten million meals will be served in April alone, with the ability to grow, he said.11 a.m.: DC suburb emerges as possible new epicenterAs Maryland’s death toll passes 400, with new “probable” deaths included in the tally, Prince George’s County, Maryland — a D.C. suburb — may be emerging as a new epicenter.Prince George’s County is home to 900,000 residents, the majority of whom are African American, The Washington Post reported.The county has reported 2,516 cases, 65 deaths and 11 “probable” deaths.Hospitals are overwhelmed and sending some of the sick to facilities outside of the county, the Post said.Prince George’s County is nearing the death toll in the nation’s capital. D.C. has reported 72 fatalities and 5 probable fatalities.10:20 a.m.: TSA screens less than 90,000 passengers for 1st time during outbreakDomestic airline travel reached a new low Tuesday when the TSA screened less than 90,000 passengers for the first time during the COVID-19 outbreak.The TSA screened 87,534 travelers at checkpoints nationwide on Tuesday compared to 2,208,688 on the same weekday last year — around a 96% decrease.The TSA says 403 of its employees have tested positive for COVID-19. Out of those, three have died and 45 employees have recovered.9:37 a.m.: China says Trump will harm global fight against pandemic by pulling WHO fundsChina urged the U.S. not to halt its funding to the World Health Organization on Wednesday, saying it would undermine the global fight against the coronavirus pandemic.During Wednesday’s press briefing in Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said President Donald Trump’s decision to cut the U.S. contributions to the WHO would impact all countries across the globe, especially the more vulnerable ones.Furthermore, the move “weakens the WHO’s capabilities and harms international cooperation,” he said.“At present, the global pandemic situation is grim and is at a critical moment,” Zhao told reporters. “We urge the U.S. to fulfill its responsibilities and obligations, and support WHO to lead the international combat against the pandemic.”8:58 a.m.: Tour de France delayed till late AugustCycling’s biggest race, the Tour de France, has been postponed until late August due to the coronavirus pandemic. The International Cycling Union announced the decision Wednesday, saying the prestigious race will now run from Aug. 29 to Sept. 20. The Tour de France was originally slated to kick off in Nice on June 27. “Holding this event in the best conditions possible is judged essential given its central place in cycling’s economy and its exposure, in particular for the teams that benefit on this occasion from unparalleled visibility,” the International Cycling Union said in a statement.France is among the worst-affected countries in the pandemic, with more than 131,000 diagnosed cases of COVID-19 and over 15,000 deaths, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University. French President Emmanuel Macron has extended a lockdown for the country till May 11. Addressing the nation Monday night, Macron said he sees “hopeful signs” since imposing the nationwide lockdown on March 17 in an effort to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. He said schools will reopen “progressively,” starting from May 11. However, cafes, restaurants, cinemas, concert halls, museums and hotels will remain closed and large gatherings won’t be allowed until mid-July.8:23 a.m.: US Forces Japan declare public health emergency for all basesThe commander of the United States Forces Japan on Wednesday declared a public health emergency for all bases in Japan as the country sees a surge in novel coronavirus infections. U.S. Forces Japan, a subset of the military’s Indo-Pacific Command, had previously declared an emergency only for the county’s Kanto Plain, which includes Tokyo.The newest declaration, which will remain in effect through May 15, gives commanders the authority to enforce compliance of health protection measures on those who live and work on all U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine installations and facilities located in Japan. The order applies to 50,000 military personnel as well as tens of thousands of their family members and civilian contractors. Last month, an active duty member of the U.S. Forces Japan tested positive for COVID-19.7:15 a.m.: Americans should prepare for ‘another battle’ with virus, CDC director saysDr. Robert Redfield, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, warned Wednesday that Americans should be prepared for a second wave of novel coronavirus infections in the winter, even as the epidemic appears to have hit its peak in parts of the country. “I think we have to assume this is like other respiratory viruses and there will be a seasonality to it,” Redfield told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview on Good Morning America.“Until we see it, we don’t know for certain,” he added. “But i think it’s critical that we plan this virus is likely to follow a seasonality pattern similar to flu, and we’re going to have another battle with it upfront and aggressively next winter.” It’s important the country takes the time now to improve its testing capacity and expand public health capacity so that health workers can detect cases early, conduct contact tracing and isolate potentially infected individuals. “I call it block and tackle,” Redfield said. “The outbreak this year got ahead of that, so we went into full mitigation and we lost the ability to use critical public health tools. We are working hard to augment them now so that, as we get into the next season, we’ll be able to stay in high containment mode while we complement that with some continued mitigation strategies.”Redfield praised members of the public for heeding stay-at-home orders and social distancing measures. “When we did our original models looking at this outbreak, we were looking at, you know, up to 2.2 million people that might have died before the fall,” he said. “And when you see, even though 26,000 is still an enormous loss of human life, it really is a tribute to the mitigation that the American public did.” “It’s really a testament to the sacrifice the American public has taken and the leadership that we’ve had in a number of these states to give that example,” he added. Redfield said the CDC and the White House coronavirus task force are “aggressively working through the best options as to help assist the states as they begin to reopen our country one state at a time.” The process is ongoing and it will be a state-by-state decision, according to Redfield. “I think we will see some states that the governors feel that are ready and we’re poised to assist them with that re-opening,” he added. “And I think you’ll see that the plan in terms of how that will happen will be finalized by the White House task force in the days ahead.” When asked about President Donald Trump’s decision to halt U.S. funding to the World Health Organization and whether he thinks the agency failed in its outbreak response, Redfield was reluctant to criticize the WHO and instead said, “I think I’d like to do the postmortem on this outbreak once we get through it together.” “The CDC and WHO has had a long history of working together in multiple outbreaks throughout the world, as we continue to do in this one, and so we’ve had a very productive public health relationship,” he added. “We continue to have that.”6:15 a.m.: Russia reports its largest single-day increase in new casesRussia on Wednesday reported a record number of new cases of the novel coronavirus.The Russian government registered 3,388 new cases in the past 24 hours — the country’s biggest single-day jump yet.There are now 24,490 diagnosed cases of COVID-19 across Russia, and at least 198 people have died from the disease.Moscow, with a population of more than 12 million people, is by far the hardest-hit city in the country.5:42 a.m.: Bill Gates warns freezing funding for WHO ‘is as dangerous as it sounds’Microsoft founder and billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates took to Twitter early Wednesday to denounce U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to freeze American funding to the World Health Organization.The United States is, by far, the single largest financial contributor to the WHO, and Gates said the United Nations’ health agency is needed “now more than ever.”“Halting funding for the World Health Organization during a world health crisis is as dangerous as it sounds,” Gates tweeted. “Their work is slowing the spread of COVID-19 and if that work is stopped no other organization can replace them.”Halting funding for the World Health Organization during a world health crisis is as dangerous as it sounds. Their work is slowing the spread of COVID-19 and if that work is stopped no other organization can replace them. The world needs @WHO now more than ever.— Bill Gates (@BillGates) April 15, 2020Trump announced Tuesday that he would cut U.S. contributions to the WHO, pending a review into its handling of the coronavirus pandemic.The president claimed the WHO mismanaged the outbreak response and specifically laid blame on the organization’s lack of support for his ban on travel from China when the outbreak began.“They were very much opposed to what we did,” Trump said during Tuesday’s daily briefing.The president said he will have conversations with other health officials around the world about where the funds earmarked for the WHO would go. He did not rule out restoring the money to the organization.Trump’s announcement is likely to set up a battle with Congress, which controls funding for the Geneva-based international body.The WHO started sounding the alarm over the novel coronavirus outbreak in China in mid-January and then designated it a global health emergency on Jan. 30. On March 11, the organization declared the outbreak a pandemic after the virus had spread to every continent except Antarctica.3:30 a.m.: Social distancing measures may be necessary into 2022, researchers sayPeople around the world may need to continue practicing some level of social distancing through 2022 to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic in the absence of an effective treatment or vaccine, or unless hospital capacity is increased, according to a new study.In the study published Tuesday in the journal Science, researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health warned that their projections indicate there would be a large resurgence of infection if social distancing measures are lifted all at once, potentially delaying the epidemic’s peak and exacerbating the load on critical care resources.The researchers used data from the United States to model transmission of other coronaviruses in temperate regions and to project possible scenarios of COVID-19 infection through the year 2025.“Less effective one-time distancing efforts may result in a prolonged single-peak epidemic, with the extent of strain on the healthcare system and the required duration of distancing depending on the effectiveness,” the study’s authors wrote. “Intermittent distancing may be required into 2022 unless critical care capacity is increased substantially or a treatment or vaccine becomes available.”Effective treatments and vaccines may take months to years to develop and test, leaving non-pharmaceutical interventions as the only immediate means of curbing the spread of infection. 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first_imgHome » News » Housing Market » Agent stock down 6.75% compared to 2015, latest Rightmove index figures reveal previous nextHousing MarketAgent stock down 6.75% compared to 2015, latest Rightmove index figures revealLatest data shows the degree to which economic uncertainty and extra taxation has reduced the amount of stock for sale since 2015.Nigel Lewis11th December 20170903 Views The average level of sales stock per estate agent branch has dropped by 6.75% compared to 2015, the latest Rightmove index reveals.This decrease in the number of homes available for sale is across the board; for every month so far this year the average figure is lower than the same month two years ago.During 2015, historical Rightmove data shows, agents had 61.8 properties on their books on average, which has now dropped by four properties to 57.6 properties.Rightmove says in its report that overall estate agents’ stock of property for sale remains “tight” particularly further north where demand is exceeding supply.Northern price risesThis is also pushing up prices faster in the north than the south – Rightmove says the North East’s housing market is experiencing the fastest asking price growth at the moment, up 1.3% month-on-month and 4.7% year-on-year.Also, it’s the regions above London that are doing the best year-on-year as London, the SE and SW all experiencing weaker price growth than their northern counterparts.Rightmove is also pessimistic about next year, which it says will see asking price growth of 1% overall.“2018 will continue the 2017 trend by being a real mixed bag of different price pressures both up and down, but the net result is that we forecast another year of a slowing in the pace of price rises,” says Rightmove Director Miles Shipside (pictured, left).“The peak in the cycle of rising prices was 2015’s annual jump of 7.4%. The following year saw price growth more than halve to 3.4%, while 2017 is finishing up at 1.2%.”Miles Shipside agent stock asking prices Rightmove house price index rightmove index December 2017 December 11, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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first_img Email* The team at Hippomundo, a leading sport horse breeding and performance stat website, has announced the launch of the 2020 edition of their very first Hippomundo Yearbook. The Yearbook is a virtual magazine that contains all the good things Hippomundo has to offer.All of 2020’s most successful riders, horses, breeders, and sires over the three Olympic disciplines are thoroughly discussed and beautifully illustrated. In addition there is interesting insight from the world’s best through interviews with the rider of the 2020’s most successful showjumper, the breeder of the best showjumping breeding stallion, and a world-renowned dressage breeder and owner.Moreover, the yearbook contains additional information about the winner of the 2020 Hippomundo Award: the founder of ClipMyHorse.TV, Klaus Plönzke, through an exclusive interview.This yearbook is bursting with Hippomundo-goodness and is certainly a must-read for all riders, owners, breeders and enthusiasts.Check it out here.~with files from Hippomundo Tags: breeding, Hippomundo Yearbook, rankings, sport horse, performance, Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! More from News:MARS Bromont CCI Announces Requirements For US-Based RidersThe first set of requirements to allow American athletes and support teams to enter Canada for the June 2-6 competition have been released.Canadian Eventer Jessica Phoenix Reaches the 100 CCI4*-S MarkPhoenix achieved the milestone while riding Pavarotti at the inaugural 2021 CCI4*-S at the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event.Tribunal Satisfied That Kocher Made Prolonged Use of Electric SpursAs well as horse abuse, the US rider is found to have brought the sport into disrepute and committed criminal acts under Swiss law.Washington International Horse Show Returns to TryonTIEC will again provide the venue for the WIHS Oct. 26-31 with a full schedule of hunter, jumper and equitation classes. We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. SIGN UP Horse Sport Enewslast_img read more

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first_imgWarburtons has created a dedicated brand for its relaunched line of gluten-free and wheat-free bakery products.The company’s Newburn Bakehouse brand includes white, brown and fruit loaves, as well as white and brown sub rolls, and two varieties of muffins – lemon and poppyseed, and blueberry and cranberry.Warburtons said it will produce the currently eight product-strong free-from range from a specialist bakery facility in Newburn, Newcastle.Chris Hook, free-from managing director at Warburtons, said,“At Warburtons we believe that eating gluten-free and wheat-free shouldn’t be a challenge and it should be a delicious taste each and every time. The number of people actively choosing a gluten-free and wheat-free lifestyle or being diagnosed with a condition that means removing gluten or wheat from the diet is increasing, which is why we have invested in our dedicated bakery.”Warburtons, which currently makes up 22% of the total free-from bakery market in the UK (Kantar Worldpanel, value sales 52 w/e 30/09/12), added that it was aiming to become the largest free-from brand by doubling sales of its range this year.The business revealed it would be launching its own free-from range back in October 2010.last_img read more

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first_imgWei Lin | The Observer McKenna Schuster (left), Sam Moorhead, Lauren Vidal and Matthew Devine worked to enhance community on their respective campuses through the 29 for 29 program at Notre Dame and the SMC card initiative.As their tenure came to a close March 31, outgoing student body president and vice president Lauren Vidal and Matthew Devine reflected on their year in office, sharing in hindsight the issues that proved to be their greatest triumphs and challenges.In particular, the two said, they took pride in the wide range of programming and initiatives they took on to respond to the diverse opinions and needs of the student body.“We’ve been able to meet so many people and to learn many perspectives and stories through all the different things that we’ve done this year,” Devine said.HighlightsIn particular, Vidal said this administration tried to focus on community, both on campus and in the greater South Bend area, by tackling issues such as the Alma Mater policy after football games and the 29 for 29 program, which paired residence halls with needy families from the South Bend community.“At the beginning of the year, we sat down with the Football Unity Council and looked at the Alma Mater policy and why it was eliminated after home games and then discussed all the concerns in a very honest conversation,” Vidal said. “Going forward, we essentially assured that we would be promoting a supportive environment in the stands.”The Football Unity Council will continue to address the Alma Mater policy annually.Devine said he and Vidal hope the 29 for 29 initiative would go beyond the holiday season and become a permanent fixture on campus. As of right now, a student government focus group has been assembled to review the program, and Vidal estimated that 10 to 15 residence halls are still actively engaging with their assigned families.“[29 for 29] was a really organic effort to bridge our understanding of how students see the South Bend area but also at the same time develop really strong relationships with needy families around the area and to bring them to campus to be honorary members of the dorms,” Devine said. “The goal was to enrich students’ understanding of South Bend, but also to develop those personal connections.”ChallengesVidal said throughout the process of working with the Worker Participation Committee — which addressed the University’s “China Policy” — she and Devine struggled to connect the feelings of the student body with the University’s administration.“We really tried to engage the campus, really giving it my all,” she said. “ … We did get some pushback after the fact; students were discouraged by the fact that they thought that they didn’t have enough of a forum for conversation or input. We understand that a gap between students and the [University] administration has always been present.“That’s something that every [student government] administration has struggled with, trying to bring the two together. What we’ve learned is that the [University] administration is extremely open to speaking with the students at all times.“I think there’s work to be done building that communication. … It’s just something to maintain and keep healthy.”Moving ForwardAlthough the two are free from nearly all their student government obligations for the rest of the year, they have several lingering commitments, including their Board of Trustees Report and Communiversity Day. Additionally, Vidal will chair the Campus Life Council for the remainder of the academic year.Looking forward to next year, Devine predicted several key issues would remain at the forefront of the minds of students and community members.“One of the big conversations we’ve had is surrounding campus safety, but also with students moving off campus and the considerations they have for campus safety and out in the community as well,” Devine said.“Something that I think will come up a lot next year — and has begun at the end of this year — are students of different socioeconomic backgrounds as well as undocumented students. That’s something that’s been publicized more recently, but I think that will continue to be something the university talks about.”‘An extreme privilege’Of the team’s year in office, Vidal said she was grateful for the ability to speak with and learn from so many of her fellow students.“This has been an extreme privilege,” Vidal said. “Matt and I have really been given a unique opportunity to have input on behalf of our peers and on how the University is moving forward, and we’ve seen that as a great honor. We haven’t taken one day for granted … we’ve really tried to give it our all, every day. … We’ve learned, truly, what a special place this is.”Tags: Lauren Vidal, Matt Devine, Student government, Vidal + Devinelast_img read more

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first_imgOn May 10 at Champlain College, Governor Jim Douglas led the kick-off of an educational assault in the name of computer and information security. He joined the volunteers of the Vermont chapter of InfraGard to introduce an initiative called VT INFOSAFE–an information security education effort targeted at home and small business computer users. Computer security experts from InfraGard announced they will volunteer their time to deliver 20 free training sessions around the state—from Bennington to Enosburg Falls. The security experts say Vermonters must become more vigilant in protecting their small business and home computers to prevent falling victim to identity theft, viruses, cyberstalking, Trojan Horses, intellectual property theft, and other cybercrimes.The Vermont economy depends in large measure on small, entrepreneurial businesses. Oftentimes, these small businesses are lax in protecting important information stored on their computers. Of the 18,000 full-time business firms with employees in Vermont, about 97 percent are classified as small. In addition, there are approximately 35,000 full-time self-employed persons, many of whom rely on computers to get their jobs done. “Residential and home-office Internet users are particularly vulnerable to cybercrime, identity theft, viruses and worms, and other security incidents,” said Gary Kessler, chair of the Vermont chapter of InfraGard and a faculty member at Champlain College. “The mission of the VT INFOSAFE project is to raise public awareness of the importance of computer security and to give the public the steps they need to take to protect their computers and themselves.”This statewide focus on small businesspeople and home computer users is believed to be a novel computer security initiative—perhaps the first of its kind. Funding and other support for VT INFOSAFE is provided by Champlain College, the FBI, Norwich University, The Vermont Army National Guard, and the Vermont Information Technology Center.VT INFOSAFE sessions will target the majority of home computer users—non-technical individuals who are unsure of how they can secure their own systems. It will cover the importance of computer security and provide concrete steps that can be taken.Security professionals throughout the United States are concerned about the vulnerability of the nation to electronic attack, and most citizens do not realize that their home computers can also be used as part of an attack the country’s critical infrastructures, Kessler said. This is especially true for computers with a constant connection to the Internet—such as with DSL and cable modems.Coordinated attacks, such as the Code Red virus of 2001, will often infiltrate a computer and place a program that searches for 100 other computers to infect. With Code Red, thousands of infected computers were programmed to simultaneously send an inordinate flow of information to a government website to disable the system.Security experts report that within the last year, there has been a substantial increase in the use of personal computers to launch devastating distributed attacks upon US businesses.The public can learn more about the VT INFOSAFE sessions and register for the events at www.vtinfragard.org/vtinfosafe/(link is external) or call (802) 865-6439.The locations of the free workshops are as follows. Complete event details will be found online.BenningtonColchesterEnosburg FallsJerichoLudlowLyndonvilleMontpelierMorrisvilleNewportNorth SpringfieldNorthfieldRutlandShelburneSt. AlbansSouth BurlingtonSwantonWaterburyWestminsterWillistonWindsorWinooskiVT INFOSAFE is a community project sponsored by the volunteer members of the Vermont chapter of InfraGard. Other funding and support has come from Champlain College, the FBI, Norwich University, Vermont Army National Guard, and the Vermont Information Technology Center.The Vermont chapter of InfraGard is a group of working professionals and others interested in the field of information security in the state. The group is committed to acting as a communications coordination facilitator and information resource within the state. They are organized under the national FBI InfraGard program.The chapter was founded in 2001 and members come from all types of organizations and industries, including K-12 and higher education, health care, financial services, law enforcement (local, state, and federal), and government. The chair of the chapter is Gary Kessler, a faculty member at Champlain College. On the Web, the group is found at www.vtinfragard.org(link is external).last_img read more

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first_imgOn Earnings Calls, U.S. Utility Execs Talk Now of Transition FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享SNL:When power generators talked about coal on second-quarter earnings calls, many were talking about moving away from the fuel, an S&P Global Market Intelligence review of recent earnings reports found.While the coal sector has enjoyed a lift from improvements in international demand for metallurgical coal, U.S. producers have historically played a somewhat limited role as a swing supplier to global markets. Without new coal power units, mining companies could be left competing over a reduced pool of customers as plants retire due to age or other factors.On earnings calls, power executives can often be found touting a transition to other forms of energy as a positive economic and environmental shift. More: ($) Power executives talk coal transition; several seem excited to continuelast_img read more

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first_imgIn 2014, Apple brought mobile payments to the mainstream with its introduction of Apple Pay. In 2015, competitors are jumping into mobile payments to facilitate consumers’ desire to use mobile devices to make payments at the point-of-sale. Already this year, we have seen a series of responses to Apple Pay: PayPal purchased Paydiant; Samsung announced its upcoming mobile payments product Samsung Pay; and Google acquired Softcard. Last week, we got an even clearer picture of how Google intends to compete as mobile payments gain momentum with both merchants and consumers.With Google’s confirmation of Android Pay as an open API, the market became even more exciting. An open API, unlike a proprietary API, paves the way for more developers to build payments functionality into their own apps, including mobile banking apps. TMG has long contended the market winners in digital banking will be those that combine banking and payments functionality. Consumers want one clear view of their complete financial picture. The credit unions and community banks looking to provide that may find an easier path with the release of Android Pay.In terms of consumer access, Android Pay will come pre-installed on devices with the latest operating system (Android M) and will be capable of both in-app and in-store transactions. Ironically, the same carriers with which Google once butted heads to offer a mobile wallet tool (AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile) will now pre-install Android Pay on their devices, likely including the Samsung Galaxy units. In comparison, Apple Pay is only available to iPhone 6 and 6s owners, limiting its reach. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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