June 14, 2021
  • 11:01 pm Main St. Arts Festival brings restrictions to the city
  • 11:00 pm Speech pathology majors get hands-on experience at Miller Clinic
  • 10:57 pm Students visited from Keimyung University and Sookmyung Women’s University
  • 10:54 pm Review: “The Nun” gets a jump on scary movie season
  • 10:52 pm Women’s basketball closes out first half of Big 12 play with win over Kansas State

first_img Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Subscribe Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img HerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNerdy Movie Kids Who Look Unrecognizable TodayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhat’s Your Zodiac Flower Sign?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFollow This Summer Most Popular Celeb Beauty TrendHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeauty 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Here are our carefully culled top picks from dozens of Pasadena events – the very best things to taste, watch, listen to, and experience, all presented weekly in our e!Pasadena email newsletter: First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment top box 6 What To Do This Weekend in Pasadena Published on Thursday, December 29, 2016 | 12:12 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

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first_imgEmma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Advertisement #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Print Facebook Twitter Email RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Philomena Lee (left) with Dame Judy Dench at the London premiere of Philomena Lee (left) with Dame Judy Dench at the London premiere of PhilomenaNewcastlewest woman Philomena Lee, whose fifty year search for the son she gave up for adoption inspired the Oscar-nominated film ‘Philomena’, is about to launch an organization to help adopted people and their natural parents contact each other.The Philomena Project, which will be established in association with the Adoption Rights Alliance in Dublin tomorrow, will lobby the Irish State to grant access to adoption records for both in-country and Irish-US adopted people and their families.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The project aims to provide finance, campaigning mechanisms, supports, and services to natural mothers who have been unable to or prevented from tracing children taken from them by adoption, particularly forced and illegal adoptions. It will also assist children, particularly those taken to the US, trace their natural mothers, fathers, and extended families, and to obtain their birth certificates and other relevant records.The project came about as a result of Ms Lee’s efforts to find the son she was forced to give up for adoption in 1952 when she was just 19. Her son Anthony, who was renamed Michael Hess went on to become a successful lawyer, serving as White House chief legal counsel under Ronald Regan and Geroge Bush Snr. After contracting HIV, he died in 1995 and is buried in Sean Ross Abbey, Roscrea.The movie’Philomena’ is based on the book ‘The Lost Child of Philomena Lee’ by former BBC journalist Martin Sixsmith and stars Judi Dench and Steve Coogan.Mr Lee said she established the Philomena Project with her daughter Jane because they had heard from many people who saw her story and wanted to help.“I hope it will help find solutions that ensure every mother and child who want to be reunited are able to come together once again”, she said. Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April center_img WhatsApp #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Previous articleAviation course takes off at LITNext articleIt’s your Generation Editor No vaccines in Limerick yet Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick EntertainmentFilmNewsLimerick’s Philomena to help adopted children find their parentsBy Editor – January 23, 2014 1043 TAGSadoptionfeaturedJudy DenchMartin SixsmithMusic LimerickphilomenaPhilomena LeeSean Rosssteve cooganThe Philomena Project Linkedinlast_img read more

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first_img Cathie was competing with 20 other contestants in her age group, seventh through 12th grade, at the North America Country Music Associations Int’l Competition Week. For Cathie playing at The Old Barn in Goshen or Santa Fe in Troy was as comfortable as wearing an old shoe, but competing in the NACMAI was butterfly time.Cathie competed twice on the stage of the Country Tonite Theater. The second time was the charm.“After I competed the first time, we had a break,” she said. “We went and ate supper and, when I got back to the theater, all the nervousness went away. I guess, doing something for the first time is the hardest.” Book Nook to reopen By Jaine Treadwell Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Published 3:00 am Thursday, April 6, 2017 Cathie Stockstill recently won a talent competition at the Country Tonite Theater in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. The Pike Liberal Arts Student is a popular local performer in Brundidge and hopes to pursue a career as a doctor one day.Cathie Stockstill stood on the biggest stage of her young life.She had never dreamed that she would be in the spotlight at the popular Country Tonite Theater in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. But there she stood and there came the butterflies.“I was nervous,” Cathie said with a smile. “I’d been on stage a lot of times but that was different. That was a big stage and I was competing. I was nervous.” For her second on-stage performance, Cathie sang two of her favorite country songs, “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue” and “Back in My Baby’s Arms Again.”When the curtain came down on the NACMAI Competition Week 2017, Cathie Stockstill, a seventh-grader at Pike Liberal Arts School, was named Future Star of Tomorrow in the vocalist category.“I was proud and honored and just real happy,” Cathie said. “I had fun. Singing is always fun to me.”Cathie has been singing since she was a little girl. She can remember singing with a banana as a microphone. She has been singing at Tennille United Methodist Church where she is a member for several years. Her guitar teacher, Lenny Trawick, is also a member and often accompanies her. Cathie also sings at Collier’s on Main in Brundidge and at events on the square in downtown Troy.When she was a third-grader, she began performing in Alabama’s Official Folklife Play, “Come Home, It’s Suppertime” at the We Piddle Around Theater in Brundidge.“I’ve been in 10 seasons of ‘Come Home.’ I love being in the play,” she said. “I love the stories and the singing. I have a lot of friends in the play and everybody there is like family.”Cathie takes voice lessons from Megan King Johnson, who was also a member of the “Come Home” cast. She takes piano from Gwen Threadgill. She plays trombone in the band at PLAS.With Cathie’s interest in music and her ability to make music and sing, it would seem that her future plans include a career in the music industry or in theater. But no.“I want to be a doctor,” she said. “But I’ll always sing. Whatever I do, I’ll sing.” Email the author NEW STAR: Stockstill wins country music talent contest By The Penny Hoarder Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson You Might Like WEATHERED STORMS: County mostly escapes severe weather threat Despite heavy potential for strong storms Wednesday, Pike County emerged mostly unscathed with the most dangerous wave of storms never… read more Print Article Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Sponsored Content Skip Around the WebIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Latest Storieslast_img read more

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first_imgPublic sector gets to grips with anti-ageism policiesOn 14 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today Public sector employers are ahead of the game when it comes to implementinganti-ageist policies, a new survey claims. The research, carried out for social care recruiter, Celsian, questionedalmost 400 social care workers in the public sector, accountants and lawyers inprofessional practice and sales professionals in commerce and industry – allunder the age of 35. The survey found that almost two-thirds of social care workers felt theirgeneral promotional prospects were equal to those of a colleague aged over 35,and less than half felt their career would be adversely affected if they foundthemselves on the jobs market over the age of 40. By contrast, in the private sector, more than 80 per cent of accountants andlawyers rated their prospects as better than those of a colleague over the ageof 35, and almost three-quarters felt they would be over-the-hill if they foundthemselves back in the jobs market at 40. A European Union directive requires all 15 EU member states to introducelegislation prohibiting direct and indirect discrimination at work on thegrounds of age by 2006. Juliet Marsh, director of social care at Celsian, said she welcomed the ideaof legislation. “As recruiters, we have to supply what our clients ask for.Unfortunately, the criteria sometimes includes youth. When this is legislatedagainst, it will make our job easier,” she said. The report found that most respondents in both the public and private arenasupported the introduction of anti-ageism legislation. More than 70 per cent of social care professionals said they would also liketo see mature staff being actively encouraged to pursue further training andqualifications. Almost 80 per cent said they would welcome the abolition of theretirement age. By Quentin Reade Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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first_imgNatural VLF emissions received by a single antenna can be characterised at each point in the emissions’ frequency-time domain by a power and a phase. Emissions received at a single point by two antennae with a fixed relative orientation in space can be similarly described by the cross-spectral power and relative phase. It is shown that the cross-spectral phase contains information on the propagation characteristics of the waves which is better utilised in wave analysis than the power. In fact, the phase information allows weak signals to be identified more readily than is possible from a power spectrogram. It also allows the recognition of waves propagating with different wave normal directions. Data from the Geos-1 electric and magnetic antennae, pre-processed by the on-board correlator, are used to study the cross-spectral characteristics of VLF hiss and chorus in the Earth’s magnetosphere.last_img read more

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first_imgBecause investigations of PAN at higher southern latitudes are very scarce, we measured surface PAN concentrations for the first time in Antarctica. During the Photochemical Experiment at Neumayer (PEAN’99) campaign mean surface PAN mixing ratios of 13 +/- 7 pptv and maximum values of 48 pptv were found. When these PAN mixing ratios were compared to the sum of NOx and inorganic nitrate they were found to be equal or higher. Low ambient air temperatures and low PAN concentrations caused a slow homogeneous PAN decomposition rate of approximately 5 x 10(-2) pptv h(-1) These slow decay rates were not sufficient to firmly establish the simultaneously observed NOx concentrations. In addition, low concentration ratios of [HNO3]/[NOx] imply that the photochemical production of NOx within the snow pack can influence surface NOx mixing ratios in Antarctica. Alternate measurements of PAN mixing ratios at two different heights above the snow surface were performed to derive fluxes between the lower troposphere and the underlying snow pack using calculated friction velocities. Most of the concentration differences were below the precision of the measurements. Therefore, only an upper limit for the PAN flux of +/- 1×10(13) molecules m(-2) s(-1) without a predominant direction can be estimated. However, PAN fluxes below this limit can still influence both the transfer of nitrogen compounds between atmosphere and ice, and the PAN budget in higher southern latitudes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgPembroke has become the tenth college to back the Oxford Living Wage campaign after passing a motion in support of the initiative at last week’s JCR meeting. The motion passed with little opposition or debate, with just 2 people voting against. It pledges to send members of the JCR committee to talk with college authorities about increasing scouts’ wages. Currently, scouts at Pembroke are paid £6.63 an hour, less than the £7.20 deemed necessary for an adequate standard of living.  Pembroke’s action follows that of several other colleges: Univ and St. Hilda’s voted in support of the campaign just last week. Balliol was the first to take up the initiative in 2009. Caspar Donnison, who proposed the motion, told Cherwell that he was prompted to raise the motion now because he saw the campaign “lifting off” in Oxford and saw an opportunity to strengthen it. However, he also stressed that this is a cause to which he has been committed for a long time, “I have been a supporter of the Living Wage for a while. I strongly believe in the economic arguments such as higher morale in the workplace and fewer benefits being required if wages are higher. I see the OUSU-led campaign in Oxford University as particularly important as this is a city where the cost of living is very high”. Donnison continued, “I do not claim that the Living Wage campaign is an ideal solution nor that there are not other factors involved but just that it is an improvement upon the current state of affairs. In London thousands of families have been lifted out of poverty because of the success of the campaign so it can really make a difference”. The motion, which was seconded by Emma Kinnaird, News Editor of the Oxford Student, noted that Pembroke is lagging behind other colleges, including Corpus Christi, who already provide the living wage for their scouts. The JCR resolved “to send a delegation of the JCR committee to meet with the authorities of college to discus reaching this standard of pay for our scouts”. Donnison was, however, quick to point out that there was a “cooperative stance” between the students and the college. It is hoped that this action will convince college to increase wages, though Donnison admitted that the JCR would also be satisfied by “convincing reasons showing that, though we do not yet have the Living Wage, special employment privileges and pension schemes put us in an near equivalent position to the payment of the living wage”. Further action will depend upon the outcome of the meeting. Pembroke JCR appeared united behind the motion. There had been concern that there may be questions about possible ill-effects, such as rent rises, that increased wages could have on students, but the meeting remained relatively free from debate. The Oxford Living Wage campaign, established in 2006 and endorsed by four academics, as well as Oxford City Council and Oxford University Labour Club, is currently gaining momentum. OUSU’s Sarah Santosham, Chair of the Living Wage Campaign, appeared positive, telling Cherwell, ‘We are hugely encouraged by the level of support generated across Common Rooms for this important community concern. We will support and encourage other Common Rooms who hope to follow suit. Pressure is mounting on both colleges and the University, and we are confident that there will be real progress on this over the year.’last_img read more

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first_img“We also hope, with students feeling disconnected from Oxford during this remote term, our podcasts will offer students a connection to Oxford life, and will give them something to look forward to each day.” She hopes that the online talks will provide a convenient alternative to traditional events, and noted that: “We appreciate that few people’s first thought at the announcement of Trinity being fully online is, “oh no, what about the Oxford Union!” But during these isolating times, our podcasts will hopefully give members the opportunity to listen to something insightful and inspiring, outside the day-to-day COVID news. Talks will be similar to their standard format, with the President or Librarian interviewing. Debates will more closely resemble a panel format, with the hosts interviewing the speakers one by one, followed by a discussion. The talks will be recorded collectively, so individual speakers have the chance to respond to each other. All podcasts will be pre-recorded.  “Moreover, current travel restrictions mean that it would be effectively impossible to secure any confirmations, either from UK-based or International speakers. All the work we as a committee do over the vacation is in the interests of putting together a term card which shares exciting and important voices with our members, and organising fully online events is the only way to achieve this in TT20.” Interviewing speakers, and conducting debates remotely will allow a solution for travel restrictions currently in place globally. Joshi commented that, “The online format of the podcasts means that it will be easier to welcome speakers who might not be able to make it to the Union for a traditional event, whether for reasons of mobility or distance. We hope that, as a result, we will have a broad range of participants joining us, making for a diverse and exciting term card.” The society will continue with a full termcard, which will be released in 0th week. It will have regular individual speakers, two debates a week (on Tuesdays and Thursdays), and will hold several “weekend specials” throughout the term.  Members will be able to submit questions to speakers through a form shared on the Union’s Facebook page. The host will choose the most popular and interesting questions and pose these to the speaker. Joshi said, “For individual speaker events, tough lines of questioning by the host, as well as pre-submitted member questions, will challenge speakers as normal. center_img “For our debate podcasts, the opportunity for speakers to engage more directly with each other than they might in a debate means that any controversial views will be directly and intelligently challenged by speakers with differing views.” The Oxford Union podcasts will be released on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts and Amazon Alexa. The Union will go online only for Trinity Term, with talks and debates in podcast format, Cherwell can exclusively reveal.  The Union buildings, including its members’ bar and library, closed early at the end of 8th week. Buildings will be reopened as and when government measures are changed. Library loans will be extended to the 13th of October, 2nd week of Michaelmas Term 2020.  Speaking to Cherwell, President Mahi Joshi said: “With teaching going fully online for Trinity, and few students expected to be in Oxford, it would be impossible to hold our traditional events in Oxford. Not only would few of our members be able to attend, but it would potentially jeopardise the health and safety of all those involved.last_img read more

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first_imgResearchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have developed a robotic device made from DNA that could potentially seek out specific cell targets within a complex mixture of cell types and deliver important molecular instructions, such as telling cancer cells to self-destruct. Inspired by the mechanics of the body’s own immune system, the technology might one day be used to program immune responses to treat various diseases. The research findings appear today in Science.Using the DNA origami method, in which complex 3-D shapes and objects are constructed by folding strands of DNA, Shawn Douglas, a Wyss Technology Development Fellow, and Ido Bachelet, a former Wyss postdoctoral fellow who is now an assistant professor in the Faculty of Life Sciences and the Nano-Center at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, created a nanosized robot in the form of an open barrel whose two halves are connected by a hinge. The DNA barrel, which acts as a container, is held shut by special DNA latches that can recognize and seek out combinations of cell-surface proteins, including disease markers. When the latches find their targets, they reconfigure, causing the two halves of the barrel to swing open and expose its contents, or payload.  The container can hold various types of payloads, including specific molecules with encoded instructions that can interact with specific cell surface signaling receptors.Douglas and Bachelet used this system to deliver instructions, which were encoded in antibody fragments, to two different types of cancer cells — leukemia and lymphoma. In each case, the message to the cell was to activate its “suicide switch” — a standard feature that allows aging or abnormal cells to be eliminated. And because leukemia and lymphoma cells speak different languages, the messages were written in different antibody combinations.This programmable nanotherapeutic approach was modeled on the body’s own immune system in which white blood cells patrol the bloodstream for any signs of trouble. These infection fighters are able to home in on specific cells in distress, bind to them, and transmit comprehensible signals to direct them to self-destruct. The DNA nanorobot emulates this level of specificity through the use of modular components in which different hinges and molecular messages can be switched in and out of the underlying delivery system, much as different engines and tires can be placed on the same chassis. The programmable power of this type of modularity means the system has the potential to one day be used to treat a variety of diseases.“We can finally integrate sensing and logical computing functions via complex, yet predictable, nanostructures — some of the first hybrids of structural DNA, antibodies, aptamers, and metal atomic clusters — aimed at useful, very specific targeting of human cancers and T-cells,” said George Church, a Wyss core faculty member and professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, who is principal investigator on the project.Because DNA is a natural biocompatible and biodegradable material, DNA nanotechnology is widely recognized for its potential as a delivery mechanism for drugs and molecular signals. But there have been significant challenges to its implementation, such as what type of structure to create; how to open, close, and reopen that structure to insert, transport, and deliver a payload; and how to program this type of nanoscale robot.By combining several novel elements for the first time, the new system represents a significant advance in overcoming these implementation obstacles. For instance, because the barrel-shaped structure has no top or bottom lids, the payloads can be loaded from the side in a single step — without having to open the structure first and then reclose it. Also, while other systems use release mechanisms that respond to DNA or RNA, the novel mechanism used here responds to proteins, which are more commonly found on cell surfaces and are largely responsible for transmembrane signaling in cells. Finally, this is the first DNA-origami-based system that uses antibody fragments to convey molecular messages — a feature that offers a controlled and programmable way to replicate an immune response or develop new types of targeted therapies.“This work represents a major breakthrough in the field of nanobiotechnology as it demonstrates the ability to leverage recent advances in the field of DNA origami pioneered by researchers around the world, including the Wyss Institute’s own William Shih, to meet a real-world challenge, namely killing cancer cells with high specificity,” said Wyss Institute Founding Director Donald Ingber. Ingber is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Vascular Biology Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, and professor of bioengineering at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “This focus on translating technologies from the laboratory into transformative products and therapies is what the Wyss Institute is all about.”last_img read more

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first_imgIn June, the U.S. – and the world – galvanized to accelerate racial equity. Sadly, we continue to experience tragedies and injustices that make it clear we still have a lot of hard work to do.We are at an inflection point, and companies like ours play a key role in creating environments where differences are valued and celebrated. Where everyone has a sense of belonging and can achieve their full potential. This will take time, and we are hard at work.We rolled out an initial set of actions and commitments largely focused on the inside-out progress we need to make as a company. This work was shared with the Dell Technologies Board of Directors last Friday. We recapped insights from the recent listening sessions our executive leadership team hosted with Black team members to understand their experiences at Dell and the changes they’d like to see. In those 26 sessions, four consistent themes rose to the top. Our Black team members want:More people who look like them at Dell TechnologiesEqual opportunities to succeedChampions to advocate and put them forward for advancementTo see action and measurable progress toward our 2030 Progress Made Real gender and ethnicity goalsThese align with the 2030 commitments we made – and the immediate progress we’re driving. We know people don’t want to wait 10 years to see progress; they want action and progress now. And that’s our focus. By setting goals and providing regular updates to our stakeholders, especially our team members, we’ll stay accountable and on track to achieving a workforce that is more representative of the world we serve.Here’s an update on some of the actions we’ve taken since June.We’ve been working with historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority-serving institutions (MSIs) for years. But if we are to increase representation across the company, we need to go faster and increase our investments. We’ve done that by providing HBCUs and MSIs with – and even teaching – our own technology curriculum in areas like data science, cloud, cybersecurity, sales engineering. And starting in Spring 2021, we’ll begin recruiting from nearly two dozen U.S. community colleges, opening up new career opportunities at Dell for people with 2-year degrees. As our Black team members called out, a big part of growing your career is having equal opportunities to succeed. HR is partnering with our Black Networking Alliance (BNA) ERG on new development programs that will equip high-potential Black team members with skills to grow and advance. A program for directors launched last month, while another program for high-potential talent at mid-career levels launched last week.Attracting and advancing top talent is especially important at the mid-career level. Developing people of color at the early and mid-level career stages will change representation at senior levels over time.We joined Time to Vote and A Day for Democracy, national campaigns to increase voter participation and guard against voter suppression in the U.S. elections. By participating, we are ensuring U.S. Dell Technologies team members have the tools, resources and paid time off to make their voices heard. These resources were shared last week in a town hall hosted by Government Affairs and our ERGs.And our team members continue to volunteer and give generously, accompanied by our company $ for $ giving match up to $10,000 annually per employee, to organizations including  Black Lives Matter, National Urban League, NAACP Legal Defense Fund (LDF), Amnesty International and 100 Black Men of America. Organizations with a proven track record of advocacy for racial justice and equity.Leaning into our culture of inclusion In addition to these commitments, we want experiences at Dell to be consistent for all team members—and that begins with accountability for our people leaders and holding all team members to the highest standards. Inclusive behaviors and leadership – measured annually as part of our employee engagement survey – have been more clearly defined in our Culture Code, leaving no room for doubt about our expectations and the role each of us plays to contribute to an inclusive environment.I’m proud of the investments we’re making to grow our diverse workforce and build upon our inclusive culture. We will keep putting in the hard work – steadfast in pursuit of our diversity commitments and racial equity. Check back here for regular updates and watch for our annual progress checks through our Progress Made Real Report and Diversity & Inclusion Report.In the words of Gandhi, let’s “be the change you wish to see in the world.” Let’s roll up our sleeves. Let’s put in the hard work to be the employer of choice for ALL.last_img read more

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