May 12, 2021
  • 5:18 am Reese Witherspoon pays $16M for Brentwood mansion
  • 5:18 am Biden to extend limits on evictions, foreclosures
  • 5:18 am NYC escapees buying commercial real estate in Hudson Valley
  • 5:17 am UAE-based GII closes its biggest trade with $301M purchase of Paris’ Altais Towers
  • 5:16 am Adam Neumann gets $22M for California estate

first_img Tags: Annette Greenwell/Bob Welti/Dick Nourse/KBUH Radio/KDYL/KTVX/LaVell Edwards/Memorial Mortuary/Ogden High School/Paul James/University of Utah October 9, 2018 /Sports News – Local Legendary Utah Sportscaster Paul James Dead at 87 Written by Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-As confirmed by various outlets throughout the Salt Lake City media market, legendary Utah sportscaster Paul James passed away at 87 last Saturday.James, who was born July 17, 1931 in Ogden and was a former student body president at Ogden High School, was a staple of sportscasting in Utah for 48 years.After receiving a four-year full-tuition Rotary Club scholarship to the University of Utah, he married the former Annette Greenwell on February 2, 1951.In 1951, James commenced his broadcasting career of KBUH Radio of Brigham City. His television career began in 1952 at KDYL (now KTVX) TV in Salt Lake City and became the television voice of the Utah Utes.He broadcast the Utes’ football and men’s basketball games from 1959-1965.In the spring of 1965, James moved to KSL-TV of Salt Lake City and teamed up with news anchor Dick Nourse and meteorologist Bob Welti.This triumvirate’s tenure together lasted until 1989, making them the longest-tenured broadcast team in U.S. television hitory.During this time, James also became the voice of the BYU Cougars, broadcasting roughly 450 football games, as well as men’s basketball.He remained the voice of the Cougars through 2000, retiring at the same time as legendary BYU football coach LaVell Edwards.James was a May 18, 2000 inductee into the Utah Broadcasters Hall of Fame, being enshrined alongside his contemporaries, Nourse and Welti.James was a 2005 inductee into the BYU athletics Hall of Fame.His funeral will be October 16 at the Memorial Mortuary of Salt Lake City.last_img read more

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first_imgCarver Community Organization 74th Annual Meeting and Luncheon September 27Carver Community Organization will celebrate its 74th year at its annual meeting and luncheon Friday at 11:30 a.m. at the Deaconess Orthopedic Neuroscience Hospital Pavilion Room located at 4011 Gateway Blvd., in Newburgh.This year, Carver celebrates “Milestones in Leadership” with special guest speaker and Evansville native Ondra Berry, a Carver alumnus.Berry is a 32-year veteran of the Nevada Air National Guard and was named Nevada’s 30th Adjutant General and the first African American to hold the in August. He is retired from the positions of senior vice president of organizational culture & engagement for MGM Resorts International, and assistant chief of police for the Reno Police Department administration division.Berry, a graduate of Harrison High School and the University of Evansville, is a board member of the University of Evansville, and No Opportunity Wasted, a college preparatory program which gives ambitious high school students more exposure to higher education opportunities.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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first_imgDon Williams, CEO of brand specialist Pi Global, reckons that in both the US and the UK lessons on how to create excitement in retailing grocery brands need to be learnedI’m writing this from America and if there is one thing about this country that I love it is its size. Everything and I mean everything is bigger, wider, longer; there’s a feeling of space here that is liberating (I’m talking about real America not New York).Flying over it from the West to the East coast is just awe-inspiring. Every time I return to Europe after a trip to the US, I get seriously claustrophobic. From the minute I get into a car at Heathrow airport and get onto the M4, I realise just how apologetic our motorways are. Now, I know it’s not Mumbai, where the gaps between moving vehicles can be counted in inches rather than feet soon, I suspect, to be millimetres rather than centimetres unless they get on top of their infrastructure tout de suite but it’s pretty cramped all the same.Don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot wrong with America the state of the quaint electrical system always makes me giggle, as I watch the pretty sparks fly. But my God, there’s a lot wrong with Europe a cursory glance at the state of the political parties in the UK, made all too apparent by the plastic ’debates’ we’ve been subjected to, makes me want to pack bags and vamoose. (I tried to avoid mentioning the state of Italian politics, but I couldn’t resist what a total farce.)The US retail sector, though, has a lot to learn from Europe: the state of communication, branding and packaging design in the US is 20 years behind the UK. Things are moving very slowly in the right direction, but there’s a way to go. The US, by and large, still wallows in a world of good old ’American Cheddar’. A wander around any middle-America Walmart or 30 minutes in front of a TV never fails to have me forcibly closing an open mouth with alarming regularity.Sustainability is a word that folk here are just starting to come to terms with. Clearly, Walmart is driving this with a passion, because it makes good business sense for them, but six months ago, it never entered into conversation. Now, go visit a CPG company (consumer packaged goods their equivalent of FMCG) and you might get a glimmer of a response if you mention it. It’s a similar situation with front-of-pack nutritional information watch out US, it’s coming!Where we don’t differ terribly, is just how uninventive the retail sector is when it comes to selling grocery brands. Sure, in the UK we create nice environments for patisserie counters and bakeries. Yes, we provide nice smells, but then we usually, just like America, simply pile packs on to shelves perhaps embellished with a wobbler. And sure, in the US, you get aisles wide enough to drive a Hummer through sideways. But and it is a big BUT they are equally dull. There is as much innovation in leveraging the power of brands and the approach to selling them in-store as there is in creating something better than a rubber strip on a stick to wipe water off a windshield.It’s time we re-evaluated what is in my humble opinion a completely wasted opportunity and took a fresh look at a stale state of mind.last_img read more

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first_imgLegendary piano player and pioneer of rock and roll Fats Domino passed away on Tuesday at the age of 89. Known for his pounding piano and nonchalant vocals, the New Orleans musician died of natural causes at 3:30am, according to Mark Bone, chief investigator with the Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, of the coroner’s office. Mr. Domino had almost 40 Top 40 hits through the 1950s and 1960s, including “Blueberry Hill,” “Ain’t It a Shame,” “I’m Walkin’,” “Blue Monday” and “Walkin’ to New Orleans.”Recognized by Elvis Presley as his predecessor, Domino came second in history with a whopping 65 million singles sold and 23 gold records during that time period. “A lot of people seem to think I started this business,” Presley told Jet magazine in 1957. “But rock ’n’ roll was here a long time before I came along. Nobody can sing that music like colored people. Let’s face it: I can’t sing it like Fats Domino can. I know that.”As one of the few legends remaining, Domino and his legacy will preserve through the music of New Orleans and through the torches of rock an roll.Watch Fats Domino perform “The Fat Man” at the Universal Amphitheatre in 2012:Rest In Peace, Fats Domino!last_img read more

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first_imgWith all the talk of whether or not the highly-publicized Woodstock 50 event will actually take place this summer, it’s easy to forget that the original 1969 music festival is still a pretty interesting topic amongst American historians and music fans. Earlier this week, the latest documentary on the original Woodstock premiered as part of the Tribeca Film Festival, and is scheduled for a wide release later on this year.Titled, Woodstock: Three Days that Defined a Generation, the new documentary directed by Barak Goodman is the latest attempt at taking fans back to the late-1960s with an in-depth look at the event that helped define the youth culture of the era, in addition to changing the future of American entertainment in the decades to follow.Related: John Fogerty Shares Doubt Surrounding Ongoing Woodstock 50 Drama In New InterviewThe film’s synopsis reads as the following,“Structured faithfully around audio testimony from attendees, ‘Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation’ focuses not just on how it all came to be, despite enormous challenges, but how it felt for it to happen: an endless traffic backup was elevated to a communal experience, and a food shortage became a collaboration rather than a disaster. The incredible performances spotlighted in the film, from Jimi Hendrix to Joan Baez to Crosby, Stills, and Nash—form the backdrop to what is fundamentally the audience’s story. Woodstock takes us all back to a time and a place now captured in a time capsule, but also reminds us of the immediacy that love, music and shared experience can elicit.”The film mixes archival and home-shot video footage in addition to audio interviews from fans who were at the 1969 festival. The film also documents the role that the festival played within society at large in America, which at the time, was deeply troubled and divided with the then-ongoing Vietnam War. Fans can watch the film’s official trailer below.Woodstock: Three Days That Defined A Generation – Official Trailer[Video: PBS Distribution]The film is set to screen again at the Regal Cinemas Battery Park this Saturday, May 4th, beginning at 2:30 p.m. For fans outside of New York City who can’t make it, the film will arrive in select theaters across the country throughout May and June. The documentary is also set for a wide television release when it debuts on PBS on Tuesday, August 6th, at 9:00 p.m. ET, as part of the network’s “American Experience” series. Fans can reference the schedule below for the full listing of upcoming theatrical screenings.Woodstock: Three Days That Defined A Generation 2019 Screenings Schedule: April 28 – May 4 – New York, NY – Tribeca Film Festival (Q&A with filmmakers and special guests following screenings)May 3 – San Rafael, CA – Doclands (In attendance: film subjects Wavy Gravy and Jahanara Romney)May 24 – New York, NY – Quad CinemaMay 31 – Woodstock, NY – Upstate FilmsMay 31 – San Francisco – Opera Plaza CinemaMay 31 – Berkeley, CA – Shattuck CinemasMay 31 – San Rafael, CA – Smith Rafael Film CenterMay 31 – Chicago, IL – Gene Siskel Film CenterJune 7 – Los Angeles, CA – Nuart TheatreJune 7 – Portland, OR – Cinema 21June 7 – Milwaukee, WI – Oriental TheatreJune 7 – San Diego, CA – Ken CinemaJune 7 – Denver, CO – Chez ArtisteJune 7 – Philadelphia, PA – Ritz at the BourseJune 7 – Monterey, CA – Osio CinemasJune 14 – Baltimore, MD – Charles TheatreJune 14 – Boston, MA – Kendall Square CinemaJune 14 – Washington, D.C. – E Street CinemaJune 14 – Nevada City, CA – Onyx TheaterJune 14 – Santa Rosa, CA – Summerfield CinemasJune 21 – Minneapolis, MN – Landmark TheatresJune 21 – Atlanta, GA – Midtown Art CinemaJune 21 – Phoenix, AZ – Harkins Shea 14View All Screening Dates/Locations[H/T Brooklyn Vegan]last_img read more

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first_img Related Fleeing climate change In 2011, researchers observed something that should be impossible — a massive bloom of phytoplankton growing under Arctic sea ice in conditions that should have been far too dark for anything requiring photosynthesis to survive. So, how was this bloom possible?Using mathematical modeling, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) found that thinning Arctic sea ice may be responsible for these and more blooms in the future, and could potentially cause significant disruption in the Arctic food chain.The research is described in Science Advances and is a collaboration between researchers from SEAS, University of Oxford, and University of Reading.Phytoplankton underpins the entire Arctic food web. Every summer, when the sea ice retreats, sunlight hitting the open water triggers a massive bloom of plankton. The plankton plumes attract fish, which attract larger predators and provide food for indigenous communities living in the Arctic.Phytoplankton shouldn’t be able to grow under the ice because ice reflects most sunlight back into space, stopping it from reaching the water below. But over the past decades, Arctic ice has gotten darker and thinner due to warming temperatures, allowing more and more sunlight to penetrate to the water beneath. Large, dark pools of water on the surface of the ice, known as melt ponds, have increased, lowering the reflectivity of the ice. The ice that remains today is thin and getting thinner.“Our big question was, how much sunlight gets transmitted through the sea ice, both as a function of thickness, which has been decreasing, and the melt pond percentage, which has been increasing?” said Chris Horvat, first author of the paper and a graduate student in applied mathematics at SEAS. “What we found was that we went from a state where there wasn’t any potential for plankton blooms to massive regions of the Arctic being susceptible to these types of growth.” University of Alaska scholar describes a coming crisis of displacement The team’s mathematical modeling found that while the melt ponds contribute to conditions friendly to blooms, the biggest culprit is ice thickness.Twenty years ago, only about 3 to 4 percent of Arctic sea ice was thin enough to allow large colonies of plankton to bloom underneath. Today, the researchers found that nearly 30 percent of the ice-covered Arctic Ocean permits sub-ice blooms in summer months.“The meter decline in sea ice thickness in the Arctic in the past 30 years has dramatically changed the ecology in that area,” said Horvat. “All of a sudden, our entire idea about how this ecosystem works is different. The foundation of the Arctic food web is now growing at a different time and in places that are less accessible to animals that need oxygen.”The researchers hope their model will be helpful for planning future expeditions to observe these blooms and measuring the impact this shift will have on ecosystems.This research was co-authored by David Rees Jones, Sarah Iams, David Schroeder, Daniela Flocco, and Daniel Feltham. It was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The New York Press Association (NYPA) honored the Long Island Press with awards for its coverage of local issues during the trade group’s annual convention in Albany over the weekend.The Press won a Thomas G. Butson Award for In-depth Reporting as well as awards for Coverage of Elections/Politics and Features Story during NYPA’s 2017 Better Newspaper Contest.“An amazing amount of work in ranking 196 government entities’ response to FOIL,” the judges wrote of the investigative piece, “Long Island Gets a ‘C’ in First-Ever Local Government Open Records Report Card,” by Timothy Bolger, editor in chief of the Press in a joint project with the Press Club of Long Island. “The organization and time must have been tremendous. Hopefully it brought about change in how organizations response to being more accessible to the public.”Former Press staffers Christopher Twarowski, Spencer Rumsey, Rashed Mian and Jaime Franchi won for a number of stories that showed the depth of their coverage of local politics and elections.“Well done and well written,” the judges wrote. “Particularly the Primary Primer focusing on recent political scandals and the piece on three women who ‘shattered glass ceilings.’”Franchi’s feature, “Meet The Millers: Reality TV’s Next Superstar Family,” won in the feature’s category.“Now THIS is thinking outside the box to tell a feature story,” the judges wrote. “To present it as a pitch for a TV show is inspired. I had to go back and re-read parts of it to make sure it wasn’t pure fiction. I think I know some of those people (in my own family). Definitely ‘Miller Time.’”last_img read more

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first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr If your credit union member services don’t include mobile, you’re not relevant. We live in a world on-the-go and if you want to grow your credit union, you need to provide on-the-go options for your members. This means your member-facing technology needs to be simple, functional and mobile-friendly. Now, Want to know the names of the actors you need to be a hit?Mobile Banking. This is the absolute star of the show. Members need to be able to check their balance and transfer money between accounts and to other people, all from the convenience of their smartphone. They should also be able to view all member services such as loan programs, that your CU offers in the case they decide to go car shopping on a whim. Your mobile experience needs to be user-friendly, with clear options, and able to complete transactions in as few screen taps as possible. An effective and easy-to-use mobile banking app shows your members that you value their time.Remote Deposit. You need a strong backup cast to support your star. Remote deposit plays an important role in giving your members the ultimate in convenience. No more running to the branch because you have checks to deposit. Snap a pic with your mobile and you’re done. continue reading »last_img read more

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first_imgAnalyticsInformation collection featuring common database, one-time data entry, and auto updateFlow and access to information, including a capability to upload third party data and access it in one centralized interface. 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Dearing John Dearing is a managing director at Capstone, a leading advisory firm focused on helping credit unions and CUSOs grow through proactive strategic growth programs and mergers and acquisitions. He … Web: www.CapstoneStrategic.com Details 2018 has been a banner year for credit unions…but will a recession follow soon? Credit unions recorded a stellar performance in the first nine months of 2018, adding more than 4.2 million new members, the fastest pace in credit union history. Rising demand for loans driven by the low unemployment rate and strong economic growth underline this membership expansion. Other factors indicate a strong performance. In September 2018, the credit union loan-to-savings ratio increased to 85.8%, surpassing the pre-crisis level of 83.4% in 2007, while liquidity represented by surplus of funds as a percent of assets fell to 23.7%, the lowest level since July 1980. While the strong performance is encouraging, it also may signal some storm clouds on the horizon. A high loan-to-savings ratio typically occurs prior to a recession and can be a double-edged sword during a downturn.  Financial institutions will lose the income generated from loans because consumers can’t afford or are unwilling to borrow as much during a recession. In addition, with an already high level of debt credit unions and banks have low liquidity meaning there are fewer funds to lend even to qualified consumers.With the next recession looming on the horizon, credit unions’ competitive advantage becomes increasingly important. In the days of social media and smart phones, user experience and member satisfaction are very important factors. As non-profit cooperatives, credit unions traditionally pass on this advantage to members and, and when compared to banks offer higher rates on savings accounts and lower rates on loans and credit cards. In addition, credit unions charge lower fees and are unlikely to require a minimal balance. While credit unions should continue to leverage these competitive advantages, they should also focus on additional attributes to maintain their superior consumer satisfaction ratings.Digitization is increasingly becoming a competitive differentiatorMembers today expect ease of use and 24-7 service through digital banking from their financial institutions. Digitization has two benefits: improved convenience for the consumer as well as lower operating costs for organizations. Credit unions still have time to embrace comprehensive, connected banking suites for multiple account and loan types to digitize every step of the member journey. For example, few banks offer a fully automated platform or take advantage of digital opportunities for commercial and small business loans, but rather focus on mortgages and consumer loans according to the American Bankers Association. To capture more active mobile banking consumers early, credit unions should complete digital transformation to a comprehensive omnichannel platform in three main areas of the account acquisition and lending process: center_img Enhancing value of in-branch visits through advanced technologies and improvements to in-branch employees experience will be critical for credit unions. Despite growing importance of digital banking and declining number of transactions at the brick-and-mortar branches, consumers still crave personal interaction and prefer to open accounts at institutions with physical branches according to a study by TimeTrade, a provider of customer engagement services. Member-owned status coupled with community-oriented philosophy give an advantage to the credit unions compared to the banks. Credit unions would benefit from mobilizing their branch staff through additional training, access to omnichannel transactions, as well as transforming branches with technological advances to reduce wait periods, offer personalized services and provide integrated online-branch experience.While it may be a bit daunting to consider a recession during such a strong period for credit unions, the reality its best to consider the future now so that your credit union can not only to survive, but thrive during an economic downturn. Fortunately, there are many opportunities for proactive credit unions willing to embrace digital transformation while strengthening in-branch experience by developing new solutions in-house, partnering with or acquiring another organization like a fintech, and investing in CUSOs. The key for credit unions is to stay true to the credit union ethos by focusing on the needs of your members and determining how to best serve them regardless of market dynamics. last_img read more

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first_img Economy,  Infrastructure,  Jobs That Pay,  Port Development,  Round-Up,  The Blog,  Transportation,  Workforce Development As the fall season kicks into gear, Governor Tom Wolf continued to increase workforce development for dislocated workers, invest in small businesses, and expand broadband access to more than 9,000 currently unserved rural Pennsylvanians.Strengthening the WorkforceGovernor Wolf built on his PAsmart initiative by announcing more than $17.5 million in grants to help dislocated workers in Pennsylvania learn new skills and get in-demand jobs. In addition, the governor announced new apprenticeship opportunities in manufacturing and electrical, plumbing, and HVAC careers.Enhancing ConnectivityThis month, Governor Wolf announced more than $78.4 million in funding for infrastructure and community revitalization projects, including the reopening of the First Bank of the United States and more than 42 multimodal projects across Pennsylvania.Enhancing connectivity across the commonwealth, the governor announced plans to expand broadband to more than 9,000 currently unserved rural Pennsylvanians. Governor Wolf also announced the launch of a new feasibility study on adding passenger rail service between Altoona and Pittsburgh, acknowledging the continued interest in this service.Putting Pennsylvanians to WorkGovernor Wolf announced investments that will create more than 600 new jobs in fields ranging from gene therapy to aluminum manufacturing.The governor also announced funding for small business projects that are expected to create and retain more than 250 full-time jobs across the Keystone State, further supporting Pennsylvania’s middle class.Highlights from September – October 2018Wolf Administration: New Grant Program is an Investment in Pennsylvania Dairy Industry, FarmersGovernor Wolf Announces More Than 350 New Projects to Improve Water Infrastructure, Promote Community Development, and Protect the EnvironmentGovernor Wolf Announces Broadband Expansion to Over 9,200 Rural Homes and BusinessesGovernor Wolf Announces New Review of Feasibility of Added Passenger Rail Service in Western PennsylvaniaGovernor Wolf Announces Investments Supporting Seven Economic Development Projects in York CountyGovernor Wolf: $17.5 Million in Grants Will Help Workers Learn New Skills, Get In-Demand JobsGovernor Wolf Introduces “Ready to Start” Task Force to Focus on Needs of Youngest PennsylvaniansGovernor Wolf Announces Expansion of Hydro, Creation of 60 New Jobs in Schuylkill CountyPennsylvania Announces First Grants Funded by Volkswagen Settlement to Reduce Air PollutionGovernor Wolf Announces Funding to Open First Bank MuseumGovernor Wolf Announces Funding for 42 Multimodal Projects Aimed at Strengthening Jobs, Accessibility, and Commerce StatewideGovernor Wolf Announces Airgas to Expand Presence in Pennsylvania, Creating 30 New Bucks County JobsGovernor Wolf Announces Six New Small Business Projects in Five Counties, Enabling Expansion and Jobs CreationWolf Administration Announces New State Investments to the Port of ErieGovernor Wolf Announces New Apprenticeship Opportunities for the Skilled Trades in Allegheny CountyGovernor Wolf Announces Funding to Renovate Historic Scranton Building, Expand Training for PhysiciansGovernor Wolf Announces Spark Therapeutics to Expand in West Philadelphia with New Facility, 500 New JobsGovernor Wolf Announces Projects to Receive $2.8 Million for Community RevitalizationWolf Administration Announces New Advanced Manufacturing Training Opportunities for Workers in Southwestern PennsylvaniaGovernor Wolf: New Apprenticeships for Electrician, Carpentry, Plumbing, and HVAC Technician Careers in the Harrisburg AreaHighlights from Instagram October 17, 2018 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img October Jobs That Pay Update: Strengthening PA’s Workforce and Enhancing Connectivitylast_img read more

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