May 12, 2021
  • 5:18 am Reese Witherspoon pays $16M for Brentwood mansion
  • 5:18 am Biden to extend limits on evictions, foreclosures
  • 5:18 am NYC escapees buying commercial real estate in Hudson Valley
  • 5:17 am UAE-based GII closes its biggest trade with $301M purchase of Paris’ Altais Towers
  • 5:16 am Adam Neumann gets $22M for California estate

first_imgLife-time records of the trophic sources of carbon, nitrogen and of growth rate can be generated from biogenic structures that show accretionary growth, including fish scales, whale baleen and the teeth of some animals. Records generated from individual teeth can also be combined to provide longer time series elucidating changes in environmental conditions encountered by a population. Both intrinsic (i.e. ontogenetic) and extrinsic (i.e. environmental) factors are important in modulating variation in growth and the apparent dietary sources of C and N. We used the canine teeth of a large marine predator, the male Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus gazella from South Georgia, to investigate both intrinsic and extrinsic sources of variation. Substantial ontogenetic shifts occurred in both delta C-13 and delta N-15 values in individual teeth, indicating a change in the trophic sources of C and N as individual animals age. Over the 40 yr period from 1964 to 2005, and after statistical reduction of ontogenetic variation, we also detected long-term declines in delta C-13 and delta N-15 values, indicating that the population has become more dependent on energy from a lower trophic level. A concurrent decline in annular tooth growth may be a consequence of rapid population growth during this period. The time series of delta C-13 values was also inversely correlated with sea surface temperatures in the region, although isolating a causal relationship remains elusive. Our analyses suggest that both intrinsic and extrinsic sources of variation, and their interaction, must be considered from Such time series data; failure to do so could result in a biased interpretation.last_img read more

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first_img Chesapeake Energy has reportedly engaged two banks to help it execute the potential sale. (Credit: jplenio from Pixabay) US shale gas producer Chesapeake Energy is reportedly mulling the sale of its oil-producing assets in South Texas.The company has engaged two banks to help it execute the potential sale, which could yield returns of $2bn, reported Reuters, citing two undisclosed sources having knowledge about the development.However, the company could delay launching the formal sale process given that its CEO Doug Lawler had just resigned from his position earlier this week. Mike Wichterich, the company’s board of directors’ chair, has been named interim CEO.Chesapeake Energy had come out of Chapter 11 bankruptcy in February 2021. The company had equitized nearly $7.8bn of debt at the time of emerging from bankruptcy.It had filed for bankruptcy in June 2020 to facilitate a restructuring of its balance sheet.The assets, which are likely to be offloaded, span more than 220,000 acres in the Eagle Ford shale basin. The company had production of 84,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day from the assets in Q4 2020, of which 26% was natural gas.Overall, the company’s average daily production for Q4 2020 was around 435,000 barrels of oil equivalent (boe), of which nearly two-thirds was natural gas. The company expects its full year 2021 average daily production to be nearly 427,000boe.For Chesapeake Energy, the sale of the South Texas oil assets will help the company move its focus again on natural gas, as per the publication, based on a previously held interview with Lawler.The company had bolstered its presence in Texas through the $4bn acquisition of WildHorse Resource Development in 2019. The deal enabled it to increase its acreage in the Eagle Ford Shale and Austin Chalk formations. The Oklahoma-based company could realise $2bn in proceeds through the potential salelast_img read more

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first_imgSuppliers will have breathed a sigh of relief yesterday at the decision by the CMA to block the Sainsbury’s/Asda merger.While the writing seemed to be on the wall since February, when the CMA’s initial findings suggested the deal could push up prices and reduce quality, the confirmation will have been welcomed by manufacturers already facing challenges such as Brexit and wafer-thin margins.As this week has also shown us, even the nation’s biggest bakery manufacturers aren’t immune to such pressures, with Allied Bakeries losing its contract to supply Tesco after seeking to put up prices.First announced last April, had the Sainsbury’s/Asda merger gone ahead it would have seen more than 2,800 Sainsbury’s, Asda and Argos stores come together, plus their retail websites, to create a grocery, general merchandise and clothing retail group with combined revenues of more than £50bn.The CMA ruled this would have lessened competition at both a national and local level for shoppers, possibly resulting in price rises, reductions in the quality and range of products available, or a poorer overall shopping experience.This was despite an announcement by the retailers – which was unlikely to have been warmly received by suppliers – that they would deliver £1bn of lower prices annually by the third year of the merger.As one senior baking industry figure told us last year it: “I am sure that, along with all suppliers, the comments of savings will ring alarm bells in the baking industry, as it implies they believe that – as the number two and three retailers in the UK – they don’t already buy as well as possible.”Little wonder, then, that the Food & Drink Federation (FDF) described yesterday’s decision as “the only logical outcome”.“This proposed merger was a bad deal for consumers and for food and drink manufacturers,” said FDF chief operating officer Tim Rycroft.“Given the evidence provided by FDF members (and others) of substantial competition harms, it is hard to see how the CMA could have come to any other decision. We are pleased the concerns of food and drink manufacturers have been heard and acted upon.”The Federation of Bakers, meanwhile, said “the CMA has given a well-reasoned argument for reaching the decision not to allow the merger to go ahead”.Further up the supply chain, the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) also welcomed the outcome.“The NFU’s key concern about the proposed merger has always been the potential impact it could have on our members,” said NFU director general Terry Jones. The union is hoping to meet with both Sainsbury’s and Asda to understand what the decision will mean moving forward – something many in the industry would like to know.An appeal against the decision has been ruled out, with Sainsbury’s and Asda stating they have terminated the transaction.Clearly disgruntled, Sainsbury’s CEO Mike Coupe yesterday said the CMA had effectively taken £1bn out of customers’ pockets, adding he was confident in Sainsbury’s business strategy.Meanwhile, Asda owner Walmart said its focus would now be on “continuing to position Asda as a strong UK retailer delivering for customers”, and that it would ensure Asda has the resources it needs to achieve that.But with the Tesco/Booker merger and market share growth of the discounters continuing to reshape the grocery industry, further merger or acquisition activity seems inevitable. And it’s a safe bet that it’s only a matter of time before bakery suppliers will be wondering what that deal – whatever form it takes – will mean for them.last_img read more

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first_imgA rising number of influenza cases in the South Bend area has prompted Notre Dame Health Services to prepare for a spike in the number of visits Notre Dame students make to St. Liam’s Hall in the next few weeks. Mary Ellen McCaslin, assistant director of clinical services, said Health Services has noticed the appearance of influenza strains on campus over the last two weeks. “We do what is called a QuickFlu Test and we have had some positives in the last few weeks,” McCaslin said. “We expect to follow the trends seen in surrounding regions, which indicate a rise in the incidences of influenza cases.” Despite the expected escalation of flu cases, McCaslin said Notre Dame is in a much better position than last year. “The H1N1 Swine Flu that we saw last year is not showing itself this year. It caused a bit of a panic in the college health sector and the public as well,” she said. “People were nervous, but that outbreak was certainly not what was predicted.” McCaslin said she predicts H1N1 will remain absent, though a mutation might reveal itself at some point. “We were just reviewing information from the CDC website today and saw that the H1N1 has mutated into what the CDC is now calling H3N9 or N3 right now,” she said. “That’s the kind of flu we expect to see.” Though mutations occur, telltale signs of the flu are the same as always, she said. Students should be on the lookout for fevers, sore throats, headaches, chills and fatigue. Once detected, the usual course of action may be taken to expedite the duration of the illness, though there is no instant cure for the flu. “This is a self-limiting illness that will run its course as all viruses do,” McCaslin said. “They are not effectively treated by antibiotics because it is not a bacteria, it is a virus.” McCaslin said treatment — except in extreme situations — is generally the same. Rest and fluids, accompanied by Tylenol or Ibuprofen to control the fever allow the illness to run its course. A new product on the market, Tamiflu, is rumored to accelerate recovery, though McCaslin said it is not markedly better than traditional treatment methods. “The effectiveness of Tamiflu if pretty limited,” she said. “All it does is reduce the duration of the illness by one to three days.” Other parts of Indiana have demonstrated surges in illness and virus activity, said McCaslin, demonstrating a development in this year’s flu season. In anticipation of the next few weeks, McCaslin said Health Services encourages students to practice flu prevention with good hygiene. “The best thing that anyone can do is to sneeze and cough into your elbow and not into your hands. Alcohol-based hand rubs are a great way to keep germs under control, but washing your hands vigorously with soap and water is still the best way to reduce germs,” she said. “Stay away from people who are sick if possible, and use common sense.”last_img read more

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first_imgChris Collins | The Observer Meg Penrose, a professor at Texas A&M and Notre Dame law graduate, reflects on her experiences as a lawyer for people on death row at a lecture in Eck Hall of Law on Wednesday evening.“He’s been on suicide watch for about a month in his cell, and they keep him on camera watch, and they will take him to the place, and I presume he’ll have his last meal and perhaps he’ll have discussions with people close to him, perhaps a spiritual advisor,” Penrose said. “Members of the victim’s family will be driving down, and they’ll witness what they believe to be justice. But law and justice are not certainly the same thing.”Penrose, a Notre Dame Law School graduate, said her client’s — 33-year-old Licho Escamilla — case moved through a number of courts before eventually being tried in the U.S. Supreme Court.“I was literally the last attorney this client was permitted to have,” she said. “My boss called me up and said, ‘Meg, I need you to take this client. He’s fired everyone else before this.’ I said that’s a pretty bad way to start, but I was his last option. He tried to fire me, but I was all he had.”As Penrose’s client’s case moved through the various courts, she said the juries scrupulously looked at the evidence and the previous jury’s decision. “We live in a society defined by laws, and the jury gave a sentence that was looked at several times,” Penrose said. “They actually sought the record, they wanted to actually look at the case.”Penrose said this particular case caused her to continue discussing her ongoing personal conflict regarding the death penalty.“I’m at a point in my career where I’m conflicted,” she said. “I don’t understand it from my religious background — I agree with the Pope. I don’t understand it from my moral perspective. But we need to find a just penalty that preserves the human dignity of the person.”Penrose said her mother played a role in her decision to represent people who had committed heinous enough crimes to warrant the death penalty. “I got this from my mother. She didn’t agree with the death penalty,” Penrose said. “She got it from Matthew, the verse ending with ‘for what you do for the least of my brothers, you did for me.’”Penrose said her Notre Dame education shaped her to be a better person. “I’ve learned about service, about serving those who are least deserving of justice, those who are least deserving of my time, my effort, the least deserving and yet, we help them,” she said. “The work is not popular. I would say it’s thankless. Every individual in the United States deserves representation. That’s not necessarily why I took that case. I’m not here to justify the crime, but the crime and the penalty are separate issues.”Penrose also said there are unique opportunities and responsibilities for lawyers, particularly lawyers graduating from Notre Dame.“You’ll learn about other cultures and other people and that will shape who you are, and it will make you a better person,” she said. “You are a part of the Notre Dame family. You are a different kind of lawyer. You are a Notre Dame lawyer. Do something to help someone. Do justice.”Tags: death penalty, death row, justice, lawyer, Notre Dame Law School Two and a half hours after her lecture concluded, one of Meg Penrose’s clients was executed for killing a police officer. “Today is a somber day. It’s a difficult thing to talk about,” she said. “Tonight, as my client is executed, there are many people who will feel vindicated.”Penrose, a professor of law at Texas A&M University and death penalty expert, spoke Wednesday evening at Eck Hall of Law about the moral debate surrounding death row, in a lecture titled “The Death Penalty, Dignity and Doing Justice.”last_img read more

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first_imgApart from personnel from the provincial agency, Jakarta Public Facility Maintenance Agency (PPSU) workers – commonly known as the “orange troops” who work under the district administration – assisted in the cleanup process.Read also: One journalist beaten, another missing after covering protestsKaret subdistrict head in Central Jakarta, Kiki Muhammad Akbar, said 40 public facility workers were deployed in the early hours of Friday to clean areas around Transjakarta’s Karet bus station and MRT’s Setiabudi Astra station, tempo.co reported.Kiki said glass at the Transjakarta bus station was shattered and a water tank was torched. Glass at the MRT entrance gate was also destroyed, in addition to two bicycles from a nearby bike-sharing facility.According to the authorities, Thursday’s protests in the capital resulted in damages to 25 Transjakarta bus stations. Several police posts, the Grand Theatre cinema in Senen, Central Jakarta, and four shops located behind it were also set on fire.Jakarta Deputy Governor Ahmad Riza Patria said the administration suffered approximately Rp 65 billion (US$4.42 million) in losses from damaged public facilities.“[The city administration] immediately cleaned up the location. We have also started repairs. But overall, the public still has access to public transportation,” he said.Topics : The Jakarta Environment Agency has collected 398 tons of waste following rallies against the recently passed Job Creation Law in the capital on Thursday.The agency deployed 1,100 officers, 12 road-sweeping teams and 20 garbage trucks for inorganic waste, agency head Andono Warih said.”We have collected 398 tons of waste so far, including debris and broken glass,” Andono said in a written statement on Friday, adding that officers were still cleaning the areas of the protests.last_img read more

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first_imgReal Sociedad confirm signing of Arsenal defender Nacho Monreal Advertisement Sean KearnsSaturday 31 Aug 2019 9:27 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link3.4kShares AdvertisementAdvertisement‘For six and a half years of service, for 250 appearances, for 10 goals, for 20 assists, for three FA Cups, for equalisers at Old Trafford and Wembley, for your unwavering consistency, and for being our very own #LeCabra, we just want to say….THANK YOU,’ a message read.A statement on Arsenal’s website extended further thanks to the defender.‘We would like to thank Nacho for his contribution to the club and everyone at Arsenal wishes him the best for his future,’ a statement read.‘The transfer is subject to the completion of regulatory processes.’MORE: Alexis Sanchez made the ‘right move’ by deciding to leave Manchester United, claims Romelu Lukaku Nacho Monreal has left Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Arsenal have announced the departure of defender Nacho Monreal, who has joined Real Sociedad on a two-year deal.The Spaniard joined the club from Malaga in 2013 and made 250 appearances for the Gunners in his six-and-a-half-years in north London.Monreal started and played 90 minutes in Arsenal’s 3-1 defeat to Liverpool last week and Unai Emery was considering keeping Monreal for Sunday’s clash against Tottenham before allowing him to move on.However, with Kieran Tierney nearing a return to fitness, Emery sanctioned the departure of Monreal and he’s signed a deal with Sociedad until 2021.ADVERTISEMENTArsenal confirmed Monreal’s move on Twitter today and thanked him for his ‘unwavering consistency’.For six-and-a-half years of service, for 250 appearances, for 10 goals, for 20 assists, for three FA Cups, for those equalisers at Old Trafford and Wembley, for your unwavering consistency, and for being our very own #LaCabra, we just want to say…THANK YOU, @_nachomonreal! ❤️ pic.twitter.com/QCZaMip2AZ— Arsenal (@Arsenal) August 31, 2019 Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_img “Yes, I pay,” he said. “I pay. They deserve this pizza and today we will eat. “It was a very tough match against Crystal Palace and this could help us make a very good spirit. “It is good to get together to eat and talk about football. “I have offered rewards before in the past at other clubs and it is a good opportunity to sit down together. It helps the team bonding. “It is the team spirit and they enjoy training. They know they can work hard and then enjoy. I hope the players enjoy it.” Alcohol is off the menu, though, as Ranieri laughed: “Drink? Drink water, yes.” The Italian, in his own inimitable way, then went on to thank the Leicester supporters for the part they played in helping the Foxes keep their first clean sheet. “What we are doing here is like a pizza,” he said. “To do well you have to have the right ingredients – players, team spirit, fans and you need a sprinkle of good luck. “The fans are the tomato. Without tomato there is no pizza. The topping for all of us would be to get to 40 points.” Leicester resume Barclays Premier League action away at West Brom on Saturday following their midweek Capital One Cup exit against Hull. Jamie Vardy, who netted his 10th goal of the season against Palace and in the process became only the eighth player to score in seven successive Premier League matches, was rested from the starting line-up at the KC Stadium and i n his absence the Foxes struggled against the Championship club. It was not until his 65th-minute introduction that Ranieri’s side looked more of an attacking threat. The England international had a hand in the opening goal in extra-time, with fellow substitute Riyad Mahrez tucking away the rebound after Vardy’s effort was saved, but Hull eventually prevailed on penalties. Vardy will be back in the XI against West Brom but Ranieri insists Leicester are not over-reliant on their talisman. “He is important but every player is important,” he said. “For us Jamie Vardy is important because a goalscorer is important in all the teams, but for a team like us it is more important. “It is important to continue to play to continue to create a lot of chances and I hope he can continue (to score).” Claudio Ranieri will deliver on his promise to get the pizzas in after Leicester’s first clean sheet of the season. Several weeks ago the City boss promised to treat his players when they kept out the opposition – and last weekend, at the 12th time of asking, the Foxes finally did it as they defeated Crystal Palace 1-0 at the King Power Stadium. True to his word, Ranieri will foot the bill at a city centre restaurant on Thursday afternoon. Press Associationlast_img read more

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first_img Magilton’s side have taken only one point from their first four matches in Group 3 but all three defeats have been by a single goal. Thursday saw them undone by a late goal having shut out a strong France side for 82 minutes. The game at Mourneview Park offers their best chance yet, with Ukraine also earning a solitary point so far and Magilton goes in with a positive mindset. “We go into every game to win it so I’m expecting to ask Ukraine plenty of questions,” he told Press Association Sport. “Apart from the result against France we are really pleased with that game. We have to set a stall out with the quality they’ve got and our players executed their game plan near perfectly. “There are always things you can do better, and for us that’s in terms of of how we hurt the opposition, but to go to a team of that level and nearly come away with a result should give us a lot of confidence.” Ryan McLaughlin, the Liverpool defender on loan at Aberdeen, is suspended after picking up a second booking in France, but Luke McCullough should once again lead the side. The Doncaster defender has won five senior caps and is in contention for a place at next summer’s European Championship. “Luke adds experience and presence to our group and we’re in need of both,” said Magilton. “His time with the senior team rubs off on what is a young group of players and he brings real leadership.” Press Associationcenter_img Northern Ireland Under-21 boss Jim Magilton is aiming for a first win of the Euro 2017 qualifying campaign against Ukraine on Tuesday.last_img read more

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first_img The Hammers are sorely missing the attacking talents of their injured stars Dimitri Payet, Diafra Sakho, Manuel Lanzini and Victor Moses in front of goal. Yet Bilic, who has ordered the club to move training grounds in a bid to halt their injury jinx, would have seen his side pick up a first win in six matches had Mauro Zarate’s 80th-minute shot not cannoned back off a post. A draw was a fair result, though, as Stoke were also denied by the woodwork when Marko Arnautovic hit the crossbar midway through the second half. “I’m pleased on one hand, considering we are missing key offensive players, with the way we played,” said Upton Park boss Bilic. “If you ask me before the game if I’m happy to take a point, then no. But considering the way the boys played, I can’t be unhappy. I couldn’t ask for more.” Stoke should have taken an early lead but Marco van Ginkel scuffed a sitter wide from in front of goal. As well as the woodwork, both goalkeepers were kept busy with Jack Butland making fine saves from Cheikhou Kouyate’s long-range effort and Andy Carroll’s header, while Adrian twice denied Stoke sub Meme Biram Diouf with his legs. And in stoppage time a frantic goalmouth scramble saw Kouyate’s header cleared from underneath the bar by former West Ham defender Glen Johnson. “It was a very entertaining game, full of energy, high tempo with both teams defending well,” added Bilic. “It should have been 1-1 or 2-2. With a bit of luck we could have one, but so could they. “They also wanted to win. The game deserved goals.” Slaven Bilic declared himself satisfied after his patched-up side battled to a goalless draw against Stoke. The Hammers are now without a win in six matches while Stoke, fresh from last weekend’s victory over Manchester City, have lost just one in six. “It was a close game,” said Potters manager Mark Hughes. “For a 0-0 it had plenty of incident. Someone told me there were 30-odd attempts on goal from each side. “West Ham were a bit more direct because of all their injuries and we stood up to that. “West Ham did a good job, they knew what we did last week and they weren’t gong to allow that to happen at home. “It was a decent game to be involved in and we’ll look back at it at the end of the season and say it was a decent point.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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